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I've created two functions:

function script_start_time()
{
    $start_time = microtime(TRUE);
    return $start_time;
}

and

function script_end_time()
{   $start = script_start_time();
    $end_time = microtime(TRUE);
    $time_taken = $end_time - $start;
    $time_taken = round($time_taken, 4);
    echo 'Page generated in '.$time_taken.' seconds.';
}

function script_start_time() is called in header.php and function script_end_time is called in footer.php

I am trying to use $start_time value in function script_end_time without resorting to using global or static. Currently I get 0 in the echo, which I know is incorrect.

Where am I going wrong with these functions as it seems like $start is getting overwritten in function script_end_time instead of retaining the value from function script_start_time.

6
  • 1
    The point in your code when you get start time is just so close to the point when you get end time is so close that the difference is barely measurable in nanoseconds.... what is the point of this? You need to call start_script_time at the point when the script starts executing, then you can pass that value as a function argument to script_end_time() – Mark Baker Sep 13 '17 at 21:57
  • function script_start_time() is called in header.php and function script_end_time is called in footer.php – davemib123 Sep 13 '17 at 22:00
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    It doesn't matter where the function is defined.... it matters where the function is called – Mark Baker Sep 13 '17 at 22:01
  • Just put e.g. sleep(2); between your two microtime calls to simulate code that takes time... – jh1711 Sep 13 '17 at 22:01
  • @MarkBaker, question updated to be more readable – davemib123 Sep 13 '17 at 22:14
3

The problem is your script_start_time function never saves the value of $start_time and instead always overwrites it anytime the function is called. So you're effectively asking for the current time anytime you call the function.

If you adjust your code slightly then it should work as expected:

function script_start_time()
{
    // SAVE the value of $start_time the first time it is requested
    static $start_time;
    if (empty($start_time))
    {
        $start_time = microtime(TRUE);
    }
    return $start_time;
}

function script_end_time()
{   
    $start = script_start_time();
    $end_time = microtime(TRUE);
    $time_taken = $end_time - $start;
    $time_taken = round($time_taken, 4);
    echo 'Page generated in '.$time_taken.' seconds.';
}

script_start_time();

usleep(5000);

script_end_time(); // Page generated in 0.0052 seconds.

Example: https://eval.in/861112

0
2
function script_start_time()
{
    return microtime(TRUE);
}

function script_end_time($start_time)
{   
    $end_time = microtime(TRUE);
    $time_taken = $end_time - $start_time;
    $time_taken = round($time_taken, 4);
    echo 'Page generated in '.$time_taken.' seconds.';
}

$start_time = script_start_time();

usleep(4000);

script_end_time($start_time);
3
  • You're not using the passed in $start_time in your second function: eval.in/861121 – neuromatter Sep 13 '17 at 22:31
  • Maybe the $start_time variable could be not in the same scope, and it does not work – OsDev Sep 13 '17 at 22:49
  • Without using static variable, you need to take care to use on same scope @OsDev – Angel Arias González Sep 13 '17 at 22:56
1

Rather than use the same function to save the start time and retrieve it, you could use a class:

class Timer {
    private static $start_time;

    public static function start() {
        self::$start_time = microtime(TRUE);
    }

    public static function show_time_since_start() {
        $end_time = microtime(TRUE);
        $time_taken = $end_time - self::$start_time;
        $time_taken = round($time_taken, 4);
        echo 'Page generated in '.$time_taken.' seconds.';
    }
}

Then at the beginning of the script you call:

Timer::start();

and at the end you do:

Timer::show_time_since_start();

Actually, I wouldn't put the echo statement in the function. I would just make a function that returns $time_taken, and do the printing in the caller.

And instead of just one timer, you could change the class so $start_time is an object property rather than a class property, and you could then create multiple timers that each remember a different start time.

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