16

I've got the following function:

... getX()
{
    static int x[] = {1, 2, 3};
    return x;
}

I'd like to have its return type as int(&)[3] but don't wan't to specify the size (3) explicitly.

How do I do that?

(Please don't ask why I want that.)

UPD

Well, OK, I need to pass a result to a template function taking int(&x)[N] as a parameter (and I don't want to pass the size explicitly to that template function), so I don't see how a solution with returning a pair could work...

3
  • int * .......
    – Zefick
    Sep 14, 2017 at 15:15
  • 1
    How about std::pair<int*, size_type> where size_type is the number of elements? Sep 14, 2017 at 15:20
  • Do the same thing as people do for strings as char* - add a (null) terminator.
    – UKMonkey
    Sep 14, 2017 at 15:23

4 Answers 4

19

In C++14:

auto& getX()
{
    static int x[] = {1, 2, 3};
    return x;
}

Also, consider using std::array instead of C-style arrays.


I cannot currently think of any Standard-compliant C++11 solution. Here's one using compound literals, assuming that your goal is to not repeat the elements and to deduce a reference-to-array:

#include <type_traits>

#define ITEMS 1, 2, 3
auto getX() -> decltype((int[]){ITEMS})
{
    static int x[] = {ITEMS};
    return x;
}
#undef ITEMS

int main()
{
    static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(getX()), int(&)[3]>{});
}
4
  • Is there a way to do something similar for C++11? I have to do it for both versions, sorry, I forgot to mention. I've got reasons to use C-style arrays, API with templates and array ref parameters..
    – ledonter
    Sep 14, 2017 at 15:16
  • @ledonter: added a C++11 solution/hack Sep 14, 2017 at 15:24
  • 1
    @VittorioRomeo as compound-literals are an extension, I think making it explicit that they're can avoid confusion.
    – oblitum
    Sep 14, 2017 at 16:02
  • You can avoid compound literals by aliasing int[] like this: using int_array = int[]; auto getX() -> decltype(int_array{ITEMS}) & {...} Sep 14, 2017 at 18:28
3

Do you need the size available as a compile-time constant? I would suggest using gsl::span (or roll your own). This is basically just a pointer and a size, that satisfies the range concept:

gsl::span<int> getX()
{
    static int x[] = {1, 2, 3};
    return x;
}
2
  • It isn't part of the standard library. Am I wrong? Probably you should mention it otherwise.
    – skypjack
    Sep 14, 2017 at 15:45
  • Except the OP intends to pass the result into a template function that expects an array reference parameter. Sep 14, 2017 at 16:08
2

C++11

Another C++11 alternative (workaround), in case your theoretical scenario (not asking why ...) allows wrapping the static array as a (literal) static data member of an otherwise stateless type:

class Foo
{
    static constexpr int x[] = {1, 2, 3};
    // delete ctor(s) ...
public:
    static auto getX() -> std::add_lvalue_reference<decltype(x)>::type { return x; }
};
constexpr int Foo::x[];

Or, e.g.

class Foo
{
    template <typename T, std::size_t n>
    static constexpr std::size_t array_size(const T (&)[n]) { return n; }

    static constexpr int x[] = {1, 2, 3};

    // delete ctor(s) ...
public:
    template<std::size_t N = array_size(x)>
    static const int (&getX())[N] { return x; }
};
constexpr int Foo::x[];

Any of the two above applied in the use case you describe in your question:

template <std::size_t N>
void feedX(const int (&x)[N])
{
    for (const auto num: x) { std::cout << num << "\n"; }    
} 

int main()
{
    feedX(Foo::getX()); /* 1
                           2
                           3 */
}

This wouldn't help you in case your theoretical scenario would need to mutate the static data, though. You could tweak the above into a mutating-allowing scenario, but at the cost of having to specify the size of x at its declaration, as it can no longer be (constant-)initialized and size-deduced at that point, and I believe this size explicitness is what you wanted to avoid in the first place. Anyway, for completeness:

class Foo
{
    static int x[3];
public:
    static auto getX() -> std::add_lvalue_reference<decltype(x)>::type { return x; }
};
int Foo::x[] = {1, 2, 3};

template <std::size_t N>
void feedAndMutateX(int (&x)[N])
{
    for (auto& num: x) { std::cout << num++ << "\n"; }    
} 

int main()
{
    feedAndMutateX(Foo::getX()); /* 1
                                    2
                                    3 */
    feedAndMutateX(Foo::getX()); /* 2
                                    3
                                    4 */
}
0

If you really want a reference, and have C++14, then decltype(auto) with a parenthesized id expression:

decltype(auto) get_arr() {
    static int x[] = {1, 2 ,3};

    return (x);
}

Will deduce as a reference to the array of that size. See it live, where the type of the reference is shown in the error message.

1
  • 2
    If you really want a reference, use auto&... that's a reference.
    – Barry
    Sep 14, 2017 at 16:05

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