4

I need to identify where some powershell path strings cross over into Python.

How do I detect if a path in Python starts with .\ ??

Here's an example:

import re

file_path = ".\reports\dsReports"

if re.match(r'.\\', file_path):
    print "Pass"
else:
    print "Fail"

This Fails, in the debugger it lists

  expression = .\\\\\\
   string = .\\reports\\\\dsReports

If I try using replace like so:

import re

file_path = ".\reports\dsReports"
testThis = file_path.replace(r'\', '&jkl$ff88')

if re.match(r'.&jkl$ff88', file_path):
    print "Pass"
else:
    print "Fail"

the testThis variable ends up like this:

testThis = '.\\reports&jkl$ff88dsReports'

Quite agravating.

  • 1
    Why can't you use "if '.\' == file_path[0:2]" or "if '.\' in file_path"? – Mike Sep 14 '17 at 22:41
  • As a rule, always use raw strings for Windows paths, not just for regex patterns. In this case, the \r in your path is converted to a carriage return, but there are many other combinations that would have similar problems (e.g. \a, \b, \f, \n \t, \v, \x, and on Python 3 str and Python 2 unicode literals, \u, \U). – ShadowRanger Sep 14 '17 at 23:36
6

The reason this is happening is because \r is an escape sequence. You will need to either escape the backslashes by doubling them, or use a raw string literal like this:

file_path = r".\reports\dsReports"

And then check if it starts with ".\\":

if file_path.startswith('.\\'):
    do_whatever()
  • 1
    Or starts with r".\" – donkopotamus Sep 14 '17 at 22:52
  • 3
    @donkopotamus: Raw string literals can't end in a single backslash; the backslash prevents the " from being interpreted as the end of the literal. – user2357112 supports Monica Sep 14 '17 at 23:09
  • 1
    @user2357112: You can implicit concat raw and non-raw literals though, e.g. r'.' '\\'. – ShadowRanger Sep 14 '17 at 23:19
  • 1
    @JamieMarshall: "Starts with" isn't re.match. "Starts with" is .startswith. If you want a regex, r'^\.\\' would do; '.\\.*' matches an arbitrary non-newline character followed by zero or more literal periods. – user2357112 supports Monica Sep 14 '17 at 23:44
  • 2
    @JamieMarshall: My regex matches what it should in my tests. Your regex matches things it shouldn't, like "potatos". – user2357112 supports Monica Sep 15 '17 at 0:15

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