2

I have a pandas DataFrame of measurements and corresponding weights:

df = pd.DataFrame({'x': np.random.randn(1000), 'w': np.random.rand(1000)})

I want to smooth the measurement values (x) while taking the element-wise weights (w) into account. This is independent of the sliding window's weights, which I'd also like to apply (e.g. a triangle window, or something fancier). So, to calculate the smoothed value within each window, the function should weight the sliced elements of x not only by the window function (e.g. triangle), but also by the corresponding elements in w.

As far as I can tell, pd.rolling_apply won't do it, because it applies the given function over x and w separately. Similarly, pd.rolling_window also doesn't take the source DataFrame's element-wise weights into account; the weighted window (e.g. 'triangle') can be user-defined, but is fixed up front.

Here's my slow-ish implementation:

def rolling_weighted_triangle(x, w, window_size):
    """Smooth with triangle window, also using per-element weights."""
    # Simplify slicing
    wing = window_size // 2

    # Pad both arrays with mirror-image values at edges
    xp = np.r_[x[wing-1::-1], x, x[:-wing-1:-1]]
    wp = np.r_[w[wing-1::-1], w, w[:-wing-1:-1]]

    # Generate a (triangular) window of weights to slide
    incr = 1. / (wing + 1)
    ramp = np.arange(incr, 1, incr)
    triangle = np.r_[ramp, 1.0, ramp[::-1]]

    # Apply both sets of weights over each window
    slices = (slice(i - wing, i + wing + 1) for i in xrange(wing, len(x) + wing))
    out = (np.average(xp[slc], weights=triangle * wp[slc]) for slc in slices)
    return np.fromiter(out, x.dtype)

How can I speed this up with numpy/scipy/pandas?

The dataframe can take up a nontrivial portion of RAM already (10k to 200M rows), so e.g. allocating a 2D array of window-weights-per-element up front is too much. I'm trying to minimize the use of temporary arrays, maybe using np.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided and np.apply_along_axis or np.convolve, but haven't found anything to fully replicate the above.

Here's the equivalent with a uniform window, rather than a triangle (using the get_sliding_window trick from here) -- close but not quite there:

def get_sliding_window(a, width):
    """Sliding window over a 2D array.

    Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/37447347/dataframe-representation-of-a-rolling-window/41406783#41406783
    """
    # NB: a = df.values or np.vstack([x, y]).T
    s0, s1 = a.strides
    m, n = a.shape
    return as_strided(a,
                     shape=(m-width+1, width, n),
                     strides=(s0, s0, s1))


def rolling_weighted_average(x, w, window_size):
    """Rolling weighted average with a uniform 'boxcar' window."""
    wing = window_size // 2
    window_size = 2 * wing + 1
    xp = np.r_[x[wing-1::-1], x, x[:-wing-1:-1]]
    wp = np.r_[w[wing-1::-1], w, w[:-wing-1:-1]]
    x_w = np.vstack([xp, wp]).T
    wins = get_sliding_window(x_w, window_size)
    # TODO - apply triangle window weights - multiply over wins[,:,1]?
    result = np.average(wins[:,:,0], axis=1, weights=wins[:,:,1])
    return result
  • Is this not equivalent to applying the window on w*x? Perhaps you can generate that column first? – VBB Sep 15 '17 at 4:44
  • It doesn't seem to be. The mean within a given window slice is not necessarily 0. – Eric Talevich Sep 15 '17 at 16:12
1

You can simply use convolution there, like so -

def rolling_weighted_triangle_conv(x, w, window_size):
    """Smooth with triangle window, also using per-element weights."""
    # Simplify slicing
    wing = window_size // 2

    # Pad both arrays with mirror-image values at edges
    xp = np.concatenate(( x[wing-1::-1], x, x[:-wing-1:-1] ))
    wp = np.concatenate(( w[wing-1::-1], w, w[:-wing-1:-1] ))

    # Generate a (triangular) window of weights to slide
    incr = 1. / (wing + 1)
    ramp = np.arange(incr, 1, incr)
    triangle = np.r_[ramp, 1.0, ramp[::-1]]

    D = np.convolve(wp*xp, triangle)[window_size-1:-window_size+1]
    N = np.convolve(wp, triangle)[window_size-1:-window_size+1]    
    return D/N

Runtime test

In [265]: x = np.random.randn(1000)
     ...: w = np.random.rand(1000)
     ...: WSZ = 7
     ...: 

In [266]: out1 = rolling_weighted_triangle(x, w, window_size=WSZ)
     ...: out2 = rolling_weighted_triangle_conv(x, w, window_size=WSZ)
     ...: print(np.allclose(out1, out2))
     ...: 
True

In [267]: %timeit rolling_weighted_triangle(x, w, window_size=WSZ)
     ...: %timeit rolling_weighted_triangle_conv(x, w, window_size=WSZ)
     ...: 
100 loops, best of 3: 10.2 ms per loop
10000 loops, best of 3: 32.9 µs per loop

300x+ speedup there!

  • Fantastic. This approach also makes it easy to plug in another window shape like Kaiser in place of the triangle. – Eric Talevich Sep 15 '17 at 20:37
  • @EricTalevich Yup! Any kind of weight func is pluggable there. – Divakar Sep 15 '17 at 21:04

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.