13

I have following code:

import UIKit

protocol Fooable: class where Self: UIViewController {
    func foo()
}

class SampleViewController: UIViewController, Fooable {

    func foo() {
        print("foo")
    }
}

let vc1: Fooable = SampleViewController()
let vc2: Fooable = SampleViewController()


// vc1.show(vc2, sender: nil) - error: Value of type 'Fooable' has no member 'show'

// (vc1 as! UIViewController).show(vc2, sender: nil) - error: Cannot convert value of type 'Fooable' to expected argument type 'UIViewController'

(vc1 as! UIViewController).show((vc2 as! UIViewController), sender: nil)

commented lines doesn't compile.

Why am I forced to cast protocol type object to UIViewController even if Fooable protocol requires, that types that conform to it inherit from UIViewController?

9
+100

Adopting the protocol Fooable tells the compiler that this particular UIViewController responds to foo(), no less no more.

In reverse conclusion Fooable does not become UIViewController necessarily.

The constraint Self: UIViewController is just another information for the compiler to complain at compile time if the affected class is not UIViewController

In your case when annotating SampleViewController to Fooable the compiler knows only that SampleViewController responds to foo(). It does not know that the type is actually a subclass of UIViewController.

So do not annotate a concrete class to a protocol if you want to access properties of the concrete class.

However you could add the show method and other common properties / methods to the protocol

protocol Fooable: class where Self: UIViewController {
    func foo()
    func show(_ vc: Fooable, sender: Any?)
}

then you can use Fooable because the compiler knows that the type adopting the protocol responds to the method.


A suitable practice to annotate a type to a protocol is for example when you are going to create a heterogenous but restricted collection type

let array : [CustomStringConvertible] = ["Foo", 1, false]
array.forEach{ print("\($0)")}

The code prints the three items using the description property which all items respond to. The compiler recognizes the three items as types which have a description property, not as String, Int and Bool.

Update:

In Swift 5 support of superclass constrained protocols is implemented.

  • The constraint Self: UIViewController requires that the conforming type inherit from (or be) UIViewController, so why would the compiler "not know that the type is actually a subclass of UIViewController"? This seems like a perfectly reasonable thing to allow, in the same way that you can treat a P & UIViewController as a UIViewController (where P is some protocol type). FWIW, the compiler doesn't currently fully support being able to class constrain protocols (see my answer below), which I suspect is the real problem here. – Hamish Jun 1 '18 at 16:54
  • @Hamish I haven't made the rules. 😉 The constraint is a compile time restriction to throw a compiler error if the affected type is not UIViewController. However basically protocol conformance means that the adopting type responds to a function or has implemented a property regardless of the static type of the adaptor. – vadian Jun 1 '18 at 17:05
  • Sure, I'm just saying that the rules are currently broken here :) However I don't buy the argument of protocol conformance being only a check for requirements – by that logic, class-bound protocols (protocol P : class) wouldn't be able to have reference semantics for values typed as P because the compiler wouldn't know that the adopting types are classes. But that's not the case – the compiler is aware of the constraint and treats such values as class instances. In the same manner, the compiler should be aware of the : UIViewController constraint and treat such values as view controllers – Hamish Jun 1 '18 at 18:54
8

Swift 5 update

In Swift 5 (Xcode 10.2), your code now works as expected without having to perform a force cast.


In Swift 4.x, Swift doesn't fully support superclass constraints on protocols, that is, being able to define protocol P where Self : C where C is the type of a class.

The fact that the compiler doesn't prevent you from doing this until the feature is actually implemented was an oversight, as said by Swift compiler engineer Slava Pestov:

Slava Pestov added a comment - 31 May 2018 1:19 PM

[...] "protocol P : Foo where Self : Class" was discovered on accident by users, and it doesn't really work completely. It was an oversight that it wasn't banned.

However this is a feature that is intended to be fully implemented in a future version of the language as a part of SE-0156.

Slava Pestov added a comment - 31 May 2018 1:19 PM

Both are supposed to work, but we haven't fully implemented the proposal yet.

(Edit: Slava has now implemented this in #17611, #17651, #17816 & #17851, so you'll get them in Swift 5, available from Xcode 10.2)

Once implemented, you'll be able to treat such a protocol type as the class type that it requires conforming types to inherit from (e.g allowing you to treat your Fooable as a UIViewController without having to cast), in the same way that you can treat a class existential such as Fooable & UIViewController as a UIViewController.

Not only that, but you'll also be able to state the superclass requirement directly on the protocol rather than in a where clause, for example:

protocol Fooable : UIViewController {
    func foo()
}

However, until Swift 5, I would recommend steering well clear of superclass constrained protocols – they currently have some nasty rough edges around them.

For example, this will miscompile and crash at runtime in Swift 4.1:

class C : P {
  func speak() {}
}

protocol P where Self : C {
  func speak()
}

let c: P = C()
c.speak()

and it'll crash the compiler in later versions of the language (SR-6816).

As a workaround, you could use an underscored protocol with a class existential typealias in order to enforce the class constraint instead. For example:

import UIKit

protocol _Fooable : class {
  func foo()
}

typealias Fooable = _Fooable & UIViewController

class SampleViewController : Fooable /* implicitly : UIViewController */ {
  func foo() {
    print("foo")
  }
}

// ...

let vc1: Fooable = SampleViewController()
let vc2: Fooable = SampleViewController()
vc1.show(vc2, sender: nil)
3

Common pattern is to do it like this:

protocol Fooable {
    func foo()
    var viewController: UIViewController
}

class SampleViewController: UIViewController, Fooable {

    func foo() {
        print("foo")
    }

    var viewController: UIViewController { return self }
}

In Swift 4 you can make vars of type UIViewController & Fooable. In Swift 3 use the above trick.

1

Firstly, the class requirement is redundant here as your protocol requires that any Fooable extends UIViewController which is a class.

Secondly, this feels like some sort of oversight on the part of the Swift team because this works even though all doStuff knows about its arguments is that they implement Fooable, suggesting that your code should just work:

class Strawman {
    let name: String
    public func bar(_ x: Strawman) {
        print("\(name) bars \(x.name) from entering.")
    }
    public init(name: String) {
        self.name = name
    }
}

protocol Fooable where Self: Strawman {
    func foo()
}

class StrawFooable: Strawman, Fooable {
    public func foo() { print("Foo!") }
}

let sm1 = StrawFooable(name: "Strawman1")
let sm2 = StrawFooable(name: "Strawman2")

// This will not compile if you define doStuff as
// func doStuff(with x: Fooable, and y: Fooable) {
func doStuff<T: Fooable>(with x: T, and y: T) {
    x.bar(y)
    x.foo()
    y.bar(x)
    y.foo()
}

// This will not compile if you annotate sm1 and sm2 as Fooable.
doStuff(with: sm1, and: sm2)

My recommendation? File a bug report.

PS. As a bonus WTF if you add conformance to the base class with an extension the compiler crashes! I mean, there's not much point in doing that, but it really shouldn't be crashing the compiler.

-1

You don't need to cast to a Fooable type object when instantiating your view controller. The following works :

import UIKit

protocol Fooable: class where Self: UIViewController {
    func foo()
}

class SampleViewController: UIViewController, Fooable {

    func foo() {
        print("foo")
    }
}

let vc1 = SampleViewController()
let vc2 = SampleViewController()


vc1.show(vc2, sender: nil)

Any class can implement this protocol but only UIViewController will have the func foo() method available.

  • yes, it works, because vc1 and vc2 are now SampleViewController type. My post is obviously simplified example, eg. consider that those objects are returned from function func buildVC(vcType: VCTypeEnum) -> Fooable – zgorawski Sep 15 '17 at 9:46
  • @zgorawski can you post more of the source code? Without more details it will be very difficult to help you. – jbouaziz Sep 15 '17 at 9:48
  • Also no, not any class can implement this protocol, check this: ibb.co/ij1Wik – zgorawski Sep 15 '17 at 9:49
  • Swift protocols are not meant to be used by a specific class so that's probably why your approach doesn't work. Again, if you have more source code it would help with your problem. – jbouaziz Sep 15 '17 at 10:00
  • "Swift protocols are not meant to be used by a specific class"? If that would be true this line protocol Fooable: class where Self: UIViewController would not compile. All I need is to understand why i am forced to cast even if protocol has such constraint. – zgorawski Sep 15 '17 at 10:31

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