4

I am re-phrasing a similar question that I posted yesterday. I'm not sure if this is the way I was supposed to go about it.

My goal is to create a form which contains several input type="hidden' elements and a click area that covers a large area of the page and includes several div elements. When any of that page area is clicked the result should be the same as if someone had clicked a SUBMIT button. In this case, the result will take the user to a new URL and pass the hidden parameter data contained within the form. (We currently do this using URL parameters without a form but need to change our solution to use a form).

<div>    <!-- start of clickable area of page -->
<form>
    <input type="hidden"...>
    <input type="hidden"...>
    <div>
        xxxxx
    </div>
    <div>
        xxxxx
    </div>
</form>
</div>    <!-- end of clickable area of page -->
5

Since your form doesn't require any user interaction other than submission, you could bind a handler for the onclick event to the entire form. Within that handler function, submit the form.

For example:

jQuery('form').on('click', function() {
  jQuery(this).submit();
});


/* This part purely for demonstration purposes */
jQuery('form').on('submit', function() {
  console.log('SUBMITTED!');
  return false;
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<form>
  <input type="hidden" ...>
  <input type="hidden" ...>
  <div>
    xxxxx
  </div>
  <div>
    xxxxx
  </div>
</form>

For reference, see on() and submit().
As an alternative to on(), you can use click().


Incidentally, you might be able to just use the DOM submission method:

this.submit();

I used jQuery to trigger submission because I wanted to capture the submit event to display a message for demonstration purposes. The DOM submit method doesn't trigger submit events while jQuery's does. See Jquery submit vs. javascript submit.


Edit:

Responding to questions in comment:

(1) if i use the DOM method would i need a different script tag?

No, you can just put it in the handler function like this:

jQuery('form').on('click', function() {
  this.submit();
});

(2) if i had three of these forms on one page with different form names then having three jquery/js blocks of code each with a different form name in the single quotes such as jQuery('form1').on('click', function() and jQuery('form2').on('click', function() etc... would seem to be a good solution - is that corrrect?

Unless you want different functionality for each of the three forms, I recommend a single handler bound to all of them. Below, I've given each form the same class and bound the handler to that class.

If no other forms exist on the page, you could bind to every form tag: jQuery('form'). I prefer to use a class just to keep things organized. I might add another form later that I don't want affected by this handler, forgetting that there's a handler bound to every form.

jQuery('.clickform').on('click', function() {
  jQuery(this).submit();
});

/* This part purely for demonstration purposes */
jQuery('.clickform').on('submit', function() {
  var name = jQuery(this).data('name');
  console.log('Submitted ' + name);
  return false;
});
.clickform {
  border: 1px solid gray;
  margin: 0 0 .5em;
  padding: .25em;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<form class="clickform" action="" method="post" enctype="application/x-www-form-urlencoded" data-name="form #1">
  <input type="hidden" name="hidden1" value="value1">
  <input type="hidden" name="hidden2" value="value2">
  <div>Form 1, Content 1</div>
  <div>Form 1, Content 2</div>
</form>

<form class="clickform" action="" method="post" enctype="application/x-www-form-urlencoded" data-name="form #2">
  <input type="hidden" name="hidden1" value="value1">
  <input type="hidden" name="hidden2" value="value2">
  <div>Form 2, Content 1</div>
  <div>Form 2, Content 2</div>
</form>

<form class="clickform" action="" method="post" enctype="application/x-www-form-urlencoded" data-name="form #3">
  <input type="hidden" name="hidden1" value="value1">
  <input type="hidden" name="hidden2" value="value2">
  <div>Form 3, Content 1</div>
  <div>Form 3, Content 2</div>
</form>

Notice the use of the this keyword in the handler function. In this context, this refers to the particular form element that was clicked, because that's where the event originated.

When a function is used as an event handler, its this is set to the element the event fired from

See this: As a DOM event handler

  • great.. thanks!... i am a good coder but know only a little HTML and even less js... ;-) follow up questions (don't know if it belongs here or not): (1) if i use the DOM method would i need a different script tag? (2) if i had three of these forms on one page with different form names then having three jquery/js blocks of code each with a different form name in the single quotes such as jQuery('form1').on('click', function() and jQuery('form2').on('click', function() etc... would seem to be a good solution - is that corrrect? thanks again! – scott Sep 15 '17 at 17:20
0

Instead of rendering multiple DOM objects (Hidden input objects) which is performance draining. You can Id your existing DOM object and use the document.getElementById("IDHERE").onClick call back event and submit. Please find this snippet useful.

document.getElementById("IDHERE").onclick = function() {
  // write you buttons onsumit callback here here
  alert("this.id");
};
<div>
  <form id="IDHERE">
    <!-- ID can be given to any object like div or span all you need is the range witntin the click event should work -->
    <!--  not required  
    <input type="hidden"...>
    <input type="hidden"...>
    use YOUR HTML
  -->
    <div>

    </div>
    <div>
      xxxxx
    </div>
  </form>
</div>

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