24

I know that a Python script can be debugged from the command line with

python -m pdb my_script.py

if my_script.py is a script intended to be run with python my_script.py.

However, a python module my_module.py should be run with python -m my_module. Even scripts that contain relative imports should be run with python -m. How can I run python -m my_module under pdb's control? The following does not work:

python -m pdb -m my_module
15
+100

You can't do it now, because -m terminates option list

python -h
...
-m mod : run library module as a script (terminates option list)
...

That means it's mod's job to interpret the rest of the arguments list and this behavior fully depends on how mod is designed internally and whether it support another -m

Lets check out what's happening inside pdb of python 2.x. Actually, nothing intereseting, it only expects a script name to be supplied:

   if not sys.argv[1:] or sys.argv[1] in ("--help", "-h"):
        print "usage: pdb.py scriptfile [arg] ..."
        sys.exit(2)

    mainpyfile =  sys.argv[1]     # Get script filename
    if not os.path.exists(mainpyfile):
        print 'Error:', mainpyfile, 'does not exist'
        sys.exit(1)

    del sys.argv[0]         # Hide "pdb.py" from argument list

    # Replace pdb's dir with script's dir in front of module search path.
    sys.path[0] = os.path.dirname(mainpyfile)

    # Note on saving/restoring sys.argv: it's a good idea when sys.argv was
    # modified by the script being debugged. It's a bad idea when it was
    # changed by the user from the command line. There is a "restart" command
    # which allows explicit specification of command line arguments.
    pdb = Pdb()
    while True:
        try:
            pdb._runscript(mainpyfile)

Same for the currently released versions of python 3.x

Good news

The pull request that allows to do what you're asking has been merged 5 days ago. What a mysterious coincidence! Here's the code

So just wait a bit for the upcoming python 3.x versions to have this issue resolved )

  • I'm giving you the bounty for the reference for the merged code.Think @Leon would also deserve some of it but don't know how to split it. He did provide a solution for the previous versions. It seems to be out of the question scope, but both of these solutions seem to be implying no CLI arguments for the new module. – TheMeaningfulEngineer Jan 16 '18 at 13:35
4

The following script will run a module and break into post-mortem debugging if an exception occurs while running the module. It should work both with Python 2.7 and 3.x.

Usage:

mdb.py module_name [args ...]

Known limitations:

  • While running the module code, sys.argv[0] is preserved as the module name, instead of being resolved to the file path of the module.
  • If the target module is not found, the error is not reported any differently than if the error occurred during the execution of the module

mdb.py

#!/usr/bin/env python

from __future__ import print_function
import pdb
import runpy
import sys
import traceback

if len(sys.argv) == 0:
    print("Usage: mdb.py module_name [args ...]")
    exit(1)

modulename = sys.argv[1]
del sys.argv[0]

try:
    runpy.run_module(modulename, run_name='__main__')
except:
    traceback.print_exception(*sys.exc_info())
    print("")
    print("-" * 40)
    print("mdb: An exception occurred while executing module ", modulename)
    print("mdb: See the traceback above.")
    print("mdb: Entering post-mortem debugging.")
    print("-" * 40)
    pdb.post_mortem(sys.exc_info()[2])

Demonstration:

$ tree
.
├── mdb.py
└── mypackage
    ├── __init__.py
    ├── __main__.py
    └── mymodule.py

1 directory, 4 files

$ ###################### Examine the module code ###################
$ cat mypackage/mymodule.py 
from __future__ import print_function
import sys

print("mymodule loaded")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print("mymodule executed")
    print("args:", sys.argv)

$ #################### Run the module through python ###############
$ python -m mypackage.mymodule abc defgh
mymodule loaded
mymodule executed
args: ['/home/leon/playground/mdb/mypackage/mymodule.py', 'abc', 'defgh']

$ #################### Run the module through mdb ##################
$ ./mdb.py mypackage.mymodule abc defgh
mymodule loaded
mymodule executed
args: ['mypackage.mymodule', 'abc', 'defgh']
$ ###   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
$ ### Note that sys.argv[0] is not resolved to the file path

$ ###################### Examine the module code ###################
$ cat mypackage/__main__.py 
from __future__ import print_function
import sys

print("mypackage loaded")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print("mypackage executed")
    print("args:", sys.argv)
    print(x + y)

$ #################### Run the module through python ###############
$ python -m mypackage
mypackage loaded
mypackage executed
args: ['/home/leon/playground/mdb/mypackage/__main__.py']
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/runpy.py", line 174, in _run_module_as_main
    "__main__", fname, loader, pkg_name)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/runpy.py", line 72, in _run_code
    exec code in run_globals
  File "/home/leon/playground/mdb/mypackage/__main__.py", line 9, in <module>
    print(x + y)
NameError: name 'x' is not defined

$ #################### Run the module through mdb ##################
$ ./mdb.py mypackage
mypackage loaded
mypackage executed
args: ['mypackage']
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "./mdb.py", line 17, in <module>
    runpy.run_module(modulename, run_name='__main__')
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/runpy.py", line 192, in run_module
    fname, loader, pkg_name)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/runpy.py", line 72, in _run_code
    exec code in run_globals
  File "/home/leon/playground/mdb/mypackage/__main__.py", line 9, in <module>
    print(x + y)
NameError: name 'x' is not defined

----------------------------------------
mdb: An exception occurred while executing module  mypackage
mdb: See the traceback above.
mdb: Entering post-mortem debugging.
----------------------------------------
> /home/leon/playground/mdb/mypackage/__main__.py(9)<module>()
-> print(x + y)
(Pdb) q
  • 1
    It implies a module without any cli arguments, right? – TheMeaningfulEngineer Jan 16 '18 at 13:25
  • @TheMeaningfulEngineer Yes, it did, but now it doesn't – Leon Jan 16 '18 at 14:52
3

You can add pdb.set_trace() in your code for interactive debugging, before the code you want to debug.

class C:    
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.x = x

    def inst_f(self):
        pass

a = C('this is a')
import pdb
pdb.set_trace()
b = C('this is b')

print a.x is b.x

Running this will output

> c:\python27\tests\test.py(11)<module>()
-> b = C('this is b')
(Pdb) 

And let you use python debugger.

  • I am wondering if/how i could start the debugger from the command line, without editing the source. – Alexey Sep 17 '17 at 18:37
3

Python 3.7 adds that feature

From the docs, it looks that your command:

python -m pdb -m my_module

will start working on Python 3.7:

New in version 3.7: pdb.py now accepts a -m option that execute modules similar to the way python3 -m does. As with a script, the debugger will pause execution just before the first line of the module.

2

According to the python command-line manpage the -m flag does the following:

Searches sys.path for the named module and runs the corresponding .py file as a script.

Given this, I would feel confident debugging by running the .py file as per your first example. One thing to keep in mind is that -m searches sys.path. Luckily, python looks at the current working directory first, so as long as the .py you are debugging is in your cwd, python -m module and python module.py equivalent.

  • If a file contains relative imports, it will produce an error if run without -m. In any case, i think the runtime environment is somewhat different when executing python -m my_package rather than python my_package/__main__.py. – Alexey Sep 17 '17 at 18:34

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