3

I want a text to be displayed as if it is just being typed. So I need a little delay after every letter.

I tried to do it this way:

import time

text = "Hello, this is a test text to see if all works fine."
for char in text:
   print char,time.sleep(0.2),

It works fine, except for one problem. I get a "None" after every character.

This is the output:

H None e None l None l None o None , None None t None h None i None s None None i None s None None a None None t None e None s None t None None t None e None x None t None None t None o None None s None e None e None None i None f None None a None l None l None None w None o None r None k None s None None f None i None n None e None . None

I don't know why this happens. I hope anyone can help me.

  • Why are you printing the value of time.sleep(0.2)? – S.Lott Jan 7 '11 at 16:01
15
0
>>> import time
>>> import sys
>>> blah = "This is written slowly\n"
>>> for l in blah:
...   sys.stdout.write(l)
...   sys.stdout.flush()
...   time.sleep(0.2)
...
This is written slowly
| improve this answer | |
  • +1 for flush(). Of course, if you really want it to appear typed, the timing of the pauses should be random; who types at a perfectly regular pace? – Wooble Jan 7 '11 at 15:31
  • 1
    Depends on the typist. Home keyed touch typists: the delay is going to be greater between same finger keys.. and probably shortest between alternating hands. Longer delay for shifting, etc. I started coding something up, but then decided to get back to work :) – MattH Jan 7 '11 at 15:37
  • @Wooble It depends. For example, I tend to type at a more or less regular speed, (...) with occasional breaks (...) to think about what I am going to type next. – The Daleks 2 days ago
3
0

You are printing the result of time.sleep(0.2), which is None. Move it to the next line.

text = "Hello, this is a test text to see if all works fine."
for char in text:
    print char,
    time.sleep(0.2)

Of course, you still have the problem of a space between each character, which can be solved by replacing the print statement with a call to sys.stdout.write.

text = "Hello, this is a test text to see if all works fine."
for char in text:
    sys.stdout.write(char)
    time.sleep(0.2)
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Put the time.sleep in a separate line. With a comma, you are printing its return value as well.

| improve this answer | |
1
0

You're printing the return value of time.sleep(0.2) which is None. Put it on a separate line. The comma after "print char" will prevent a newline from being printed but it will introduce a single space after each character.

Try this instead:

>>> import sys
>>> import time
>>> text = "Hello, this is a test text to see if all works fine."
>>> for char in text:
...     sys.stdout.write(char)
...     time.sleep(0.2)
| improve this answer | |
  • MattH beat me to the punch and also correctly included the flush() call. – Jeremy Brown Jan 7 '11 at 15:29
1
0

Your example prints them all on separate lines I think (at least on windows). You can use printing to sys.stdout to get around this.

import time, sys
for character in text:
    sys.stdout.write(character)
    time.sleep(0.2)
| improve this answer | |
1
0

this line:

print char, time.sleep(0.2)

decodes as "print the value of char, and then print the return value of the function time.sleep() (which is None)".

You can break them onto separate lines, but the default behavior of print followed by a comma will leave you with spaces between the characters that you probably don't want. If not, look up how to change the behavior of print, or do something like this:

>>> import sys
>>> import time
>>> for char in "test string\n":
...    sys.stdout.write(char)
...    time.sleep(0.2)
...
test string
>>>
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Thank you all for your help, this is my final code, I made a random timing for the delay as mentioned by Wooble:

import time
import sys
from random import randrange

text = "This is the introduction text."

for c in text:
    sys.stdout.write(c)
    sys.stdout.flush()
    seconds = "0." + str(randrange(1, 4, 1))
    seconds = float(seconds)
    time.sleep(seconds)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is so fireeee. Thanks for asking and sharing! – max May 28 at 18:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.