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I'm having trouble explaining why my performance test return significantly different results on 2 different types of run.

Steps to reproduce issue:

  1. Get the code from gist: https://gist.github.com/AVAVT/83685bfe5280efc7278465f90657b9ea
  2. Run node practice1.generator
  3. Run node practice1.performance-test

practice1.generator should generate a test-data.json file, and log some searching algorithm execution time into the console. After that, practice1.performance-test reads from test-data.json, and perform the exact same evaluation function on that same data.

The output on my machine is consistently similar to this:

> node practice1.generator
Generate time: 9,307,061,368 nanoseconds
Total time using indexOf             : 7,005,750 nanoseconds
Total time using for loop            : 7,463,967 nanoseconds
Total time using binary search       : 1,741,822 nanoseconds
Total time using interpolation search: 915,532 nanoseconds

> node practice1.performance-test
Total time using indexOf             : 11,574,993 nanoseconds
Total time using for loop            : 8,765,902 nanoseconds
Total time using binary search       : 2,365,598 nanoseconds
Total time using interpolation search: 771,005 nanoseconds

Note the difference in execution time in the case of indexOf and binary search comparing to the other algorithms.

If I repeatedly run node practice1.generator or node practice1.performance-test, the result is quite consistent though.

Now this is so troubling, I can't find a way to figure out which result is credible, and why such differences occur. Is it caused by a difference between the generated test array vs JSON.parse-d test array; or is it caused by process.hrtime(); or is it some unknown reason I couldn't even fathom?


Update: I have traced the cause of the indexOf case to be because of JSON.parse. Inside practice1.generator, the tests array is the original generated array; while in practice1.performance-test the array is read from the json file and is probably different from the original array somehow.

If within practice1.generator I instead JSON.parse() a new array from the string:

var tests2 = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(tests));

performanceUtil.performanceTest(tests2);

The execution time of indexOf is now consistent on both files.

> node practice1.generator
Generate time: 9,026,080,466 nanoseconds
Total time using indexOf             : 11,016,420 nanoseconds
Total time using for loop            : 8,534,540 nanoseconds
Total time using binary search       : 1,586,780 nanoseconds
Total time using interpolation search: 742,460 nanoseconds

> node practice1.performance-test
Total time using indexOf             : 11,423,556 nanoseconds
Total time using for loop            : 8,509,602 nanoseconds
Total time using binary search       : 2,303,099 nanoseconds
Total time using interpolation search: 718,723 nanoseconds

So at least I know indexOf run better on the original array and worse on a JSON.parse-d array. Still I only know the reason, no clue why.

The Binary search execution time remain different on 2 files, consistently taking ~1.7ms in practice1.generator (even when using a JSON.parse-d object) and ~2.3ms in practice1.performance-test.


Below is the same code as in the gist, provided for future reference purpose.

/*
 * performance-utils.js
 */
'use strict';

const performanceTest = function(tests){
  var tindexOf = process.hrtime();
  tests.forEach(testcase => {
    var result = testcase.input.indexOf(testcase.target);

    if(result !== testcase.output) console.log("Errr", result, testcase.output);
  });
  tindexOf = process.hrtime(tindexOf);

  var tmanual = process.hrtime();
  tests.forEach(testcase => {
    const arrLen = testcase.input.length;
    var result = -1;
    for(var i=0;i<arrLen;i++){
      if(testcase.input[i] === testcase.target){
        result = i;
        break;
      }
    }

    if(result !== testcase.output) console.log("Errr", result, testcase.output);
  });
  tmanual = process.hrtime(tmanual);

  var tbinary = process.hrtime();
  tests.forEach(testcase => {
    var max = testcase.input.length-1;
    var min = 0;
    var check, num;
    var result = -1;

    while(max => min){
      check = Math.floor((max+min)/2);
      num = testcase.input[check];

      if(num === testcase.target){
        result = check;
        break;
      }
      else if(num > testcase.target) max = check-1;
      else min = check+1;
    }

    if(result !== testcase.output) console.log("Errr", result, testcase.output);
  });
  tbinary = process.hrtime(tbinary);


  var tinterpolation = process.hrtime();
  tests.forEach(testcase => {
    var max = testcase.input.length-1;
    var min = 0;
    var result = -1;
    var check, num;

    while(max > min && testcase.target >= testcase.input[min] && testcase.target <= testcase.input[max]){
      check = min +  Math.round((max-min) * (testcase.target - testcase.input[min]) / (testcase.input[max]-testcase.input[min]));
      num = testcase.input[check];

      if(num === testcase.target){
        result = check;
        break;
      }
      else if(testcase.target > num) min = check + 1;
      else max = check - 1;
    }

    if(result === -1 && testcase.input[max] == testcase.target) result = max;

    if(result !== testcase.output) console.log("Errr", result, testcase.output);
  });
  tinterpolation = process.hrtime(tinterpolation);

  console.log(`Total time using indexOf             : ${(tindexOf[0] * 1e9 + tindexOf[1]).toString().replace(/\B(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/g, ",")} nanoseconds`);
  console.log(`Total time using for loop            : ${(tmanual[0] * 1e9 + tmanual[1]).toString().replace(/\B(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/g, ",")} nanoseconds`);
  console.log(`Total time using binary search       : ${(tbinary[0] * 1e9 + tbinary[1]).toString().replace(/\B(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/g, ",")} nanoseconds`);
  console.log(`Total time using interpolation search: ${(tinterpolation[0] * 1e9 + tinterpolation[1]).toString().replace(/\B(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/g, ",")} nanoseconds`);
}

module.exports = { performanceTest }




/*
 * practice1.generator.js
 */
'use strict';

require('util');
const performanceUtil = require('./performance-utils');
const fs = require('fs');
const path = require('path');
const outputFilePath = path.join(__dirname, process.argv[3] || 'test-data.json');

const AMOUNT_TO_GENERATE = parseInt(process.argv[2] || 1000);

// Make sure ARRAY_LENGTH_MAX < (MAX_NUMBER - MIN_NUMBER)
const ARRAY_LENGTH_MIN = 10000;
const ARRAY_LENGTH_MAX = 18000;
const MIN_NUMBER = -10000;
const MAX_NUMBER = 10000;

const candidates = Array.from(Array(MAX_NUMBER - MIN_NUMBER + 1), (item, index) => MIN_NUMBER + index);

function createNewTestcase(){
  var input = candidates.slice();
  const lengthToGenerate = Math.floor(Math.random()*(ARRAY_LENGTH_MAX - ARRAY_LENGTH_MIN + 1)) + ARRAY_LENGTH_MIN;

  while(input.length > lengthToGenerate){
    input.splice(Math.floor(Math.random()*input.length), 1);
  }

  const notfound = input.length === lengthToGenerate ?
    input.splice(Math.floor(Math.random()*input.length), 1)[0] : MIN_NUMBER-1;

  const output = Math.floor(Math.random()*(input.length+1)) - 1;
  const target = output === -1 ? notfound : input[output];

  return {
    input,
    target,
    output
  };
}

var tgen = process.hrtime();

var tests = [];
while(tests.length < AMOUNT_TO_GENERATE){
  tests.push(createNewTestcase());
}

fs.writeFileSync(outputFilePath, JSON.stringify(tests));
var tgen = process.hrtime(tgen);
console.log(`Generate time: ${(tgen[0] * 1e9 + tgen[1]).toString().replace(/\B(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/g, ",")} nanoseconds`);

performanceUtil.performanceTest(tests);



/*
 * practice1.performance-test.js
 */
'use strict';

require('util');
const performanceUtil = require('./performance-utils');
const fs = require('fs');
const path = require('path');
const outputFilePath = path.join(__dirname, process.argv[2] || 'test-data.json');

var tests = JSON.parse(fs.readFileSync(outputFilePath));
performanceUtil.performanceTest(tests);

  • What version of node are you running? – Sam H. Sep 21 '17 at 3:26
  • Hey there @SamH. I'm using node v6.11 – AVAVT Sep 21 '17 at 8:52
  • Just tested on 8.5.0 Current and got the same result. – AVAVT Sep 21 '17 at 9:49
2
+150

As you have already noticed, the performance difference leads to the comparison: generated array vs JSON.parsed. What we have in both cases: same arrays with same numbers? So the look up performance must be the same? No.

Every Javascript engine has various data type structures for representing same values(numbers, objects, arrays, etc). In most cases optimizer tries to find out the best data type to use. And also often generates some additional meta information, like hidden clases or tags for arrays.

There are several very nice articles about the data types:

So why arrays created by JSON.parse are slow? The parser, when creating values, doesn't properly optimize the data structures, and as the result we get untagged arrays with boxed doubles. But we can optimize the arrays afterwards with Array.from and in your case, same as the generated arrays, you get smi arrays with smi numbers. Here is an example based on your sample.

const fs = require('fs');
const path = require('path');
const outputFilePath = path.join(__dirname, process.argv[2] || 'test-data.json');

let tests = JSON.parse(fs.readFileSync(outputFilePath));

// for this demo we take only the first items array
var arrSlow = tests[0].input;
// `slice` copies array as-is
var arrSlow2 = tests[0].input.slice();
// array is copied and optimized
var arrFast = Array.from(tests[0].input);

console.log(%HasFastSmiElements(arrFast), %HasFastSmiElements(arrSlow), %HasFastSmiElements(arrSlow2));
//> true, false, false
console.log(%HasFastObjectElements(arrFast), %HasFastObjectElements(arrSlow), %HasFastObjectElements(arrSlow2));
//> false, true, true
console.log(%HasFastDoubleElements(arrFast), %HasFastDoubleElements(arrSlow), %HasFastDoubleElements(arrSlow2));
//> false, false, false

// small numbers and unboxed doubles in action
console.log(%HasFastDoubleElements([Math.pow(2, 31)]));
console.log(%HasFastSmiElements([Math.pow(2, 30)]));

Run it with node --allow-natives-syntax test.js

1

OK...first of all lets talk about testing strategy...

Running this tests several times gives incredible different results fluctuating a lot for each point... see results here

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1Z95GtT85BljpNda4l-usPjNTA5lJtUmmcY7BVB8fFGQ/edit?usp=sharing

After test update (running 100 tests in a row and calculating average) I score that the main difference in execution times are:

  • the indexOf and for loops are working better in GENERATOR scenario
  • the binary search and interpolation search are working better in JSON-parse scenario

Please look at the google doc before...

OK.. Great... This thing is much more easier to explain... basicly we trapped into situation when RANDOM memory access(binary, interpolation search) and CONSECUTIVE memory access(indexOf, for) give different results


Hmmm. Lets go deeper inside the memory management model of NodeJS

First of all NodeJS has several array representations, I actually know only two - numberArray, objectArray(means array that can include value of any type)

Lets look at GENERATOR scenario:

During initial array creation NodeJS is ABLE to detect that your array contains only numbers, as array starting from only numbers, and nothing of other type is added to it. This results in using simple memory allocation strategy, just raw row of integers going one by one in memory...

Array is represented as array of raw numbers in memory, most likely only memory paging table has an effect here

This fact clearly explains why CONSECUTIVE memory access works better in this case.

Lets look at JSON-parse scenario:

During the JSON parsing structure of JSON is unpredictable(NodeJS uses a stream JSON parser(99.99% confidence)), every value is tracted as most cozy for JSON parsing, so...

Array is represented as array of references to the numbers in memory, just because while parsing JSON this solution is more productive in most cases (and nobody cares (devil) )

As far as we allocating memory in heap by small chunks memory gets filled in more fluid way

Also in this model RANDOM memory access gives better results, because NodeJS engine has no options - to optimize access time it creates good either prefix tree either hash map which gives constant access time in RANDOM memory access scenarios

And this is quite good explanation why JSON-parse scenario wins during binary, interpolation search

  • Thank you very much for your answer. I learned a lot from both answers, but since my bounty is nearing the end I'll have to choose tenbits' because it provides proof in form of code and articles specifically on V8. – AVAVT Sep 27 '17 at 2:05
  • 1
    Ok... Just... He answered on another question to you... Hardest question for me to answer was to explain why you encountered "Perfomance gain" only on binaty search... Anyway thank you for intresting question, I had great time thinking on it! – Andrii Muzalevskyi Sep 27 '17 at 5:29

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