12

I am testing ConcurrentHashMap on Oracle's Java 8 implementation:

ConcurrentMap<String, String> concurrentMap = new ConcurrentHashMap<>();
String result = concurrentMap.computeIfAbsent("A", k -> "B");
System.out.println(result);  // "B"
result = concurrentMap.putIfAbsent("AA", "BB");
System.out.println(result);  // null

The Javadoc of computeIfAbsent does say that

Implementation Requirements:

The default implementation is equivalent to the following steps for this map, then returning the current value or null if now absent:

if (map.get(key) == null) {
    V newValue = mappingFunction.apply(key);
    if (newValue != null)
        return map.putIfAbsent(key, newValue);
}

It said then returning the current value or null if now absent. So shouldn't it be returning null? Given that putIfAbsent is also returning null.

What am I missing here?

  • I don't see that this is contradictory with the specification at all – fge Sep 18 '17 at 5:32
  • 1
    The pseudocode in the Javadoc is meant for illustration. The actual implementation, while similar, handles your case properly. – Joe C Sep 18 '17 at 5:34
  • 4
    The documentation has been fixed in java 9. See the bug and the fixed version of the javadoc – Misha Sep 18 '17 at 7:54
  • @Misha Thanks for pointing that out, wonderful. No more debate :) – user1589188 Sep 18 '17 at 8:10
  • @Misha: thanks, I added it to the answer – Holger Sep 18 '17 at 8:37
16

The code example of ConcurrentMap.computeIfAbsent is not reflecting the actual intention, most likely a mistake caused by the non-intuitive behavior of putIfAbsent, while the implementation obeys the documented intention. This has been reported in JDK-8174087 and fixed in Java 9

Note that the contract for Map.computeIfAbsent is

Implementation Requirements:

The default implementation is equivalent to the following steps for this map, then returning the current value or null if now absent:

if (map.get(key) == null) {
    V newValue = mappingFunction.apply(key);
    if (newValue != null)
        map.put(key, newValue);
}

omitting the return statement. But clearly says

Returns:

the current (existing or computed) value associated with the specified key, or null if the computed value is null

It is the documentation of ConcurrentMap.computeIfAbsent that tries to incorporate the concurrency aspect, falling for the non-inuitive behavior of putIfAbsent:

Implementation Requirements:

The default implementation is equivalent to the following steps for this map, then returning the current value or null if now absent:

if (map.get(key) == null) {
    V newValue = mappingFunction.apply(key);
    if (newValue != null)
        return map.putIfAbsent(key, newValue);
}

but it still says

Returns:

the current (existing or computed) value associated with the specified key, or null if the computed value is null

and the documented intention should have precedence over a code example. Note that the actual default implementation of ConcurrentMap.computeIfAbsent is in line with the documented intention:

@Override
default V computeIfAbsent(K key,
        Function<? super K, ? extends V> mappingFunction) {
    Objects.requireNonNull(mappingFunction);
    V v, newValue;
    return ((v = get(key)) == null &&
            (newValue = mappingFunction.apply(key)) != null &&
            (v = putIfAbsent(key, newValue)) == null) ? newValue : v;
}

So the implementation of ConcurrentHashMap.computeIfAbsent does conform to the documented intention of both, ConcurrentMap.computeIfAbsent and Map.computeIfAbsent regarding the returned value and is also equivalent to the default implementation provided by the interfaces.

For completeness, the default implementation of Map.computeIfAbsent is

default V computeIfAbsent(K key,
        Function<? super K, ? extends V> mappingFunction) {
    Objects.requireNonNull(mappingFunction);
    V v;
    if ((v = get(key)) == null) {
        V newValue;
        if ((newValue = mappingFunction.apply(key)) != null) {
            put(key, newValue);
            return newValue;
        }
    }

    return v;
}
  • 3
    TL;DR that's just a bad example in the documentation? – Eugene Sep 18 '17 at 6:56
  • 1
    @Eugene: exactly. – Holger Sep 18 '17 at 6:57
  • Thanks. However, besides the code example, the doc also said above the code: "then returning the current value or null if now absent". Which contradicts to its behaviour "returning the current value or new value if now absent". – user1589188 Sep 18 '17 at 7:26
  • 1
    @user1589188: “the current value” is the value stored in the map when the method returns, which might be either “existing or computed”, as stated. “if now absent” means “if the mapping has been removed upon return”, which can only happen if your function returned null, so in that case, the returned value is also identical to the computed value. – Holger Sep 18 '17 at 7:30
  • @Holger I can't agree. As computeIfAbsent does not remove entry even if the computed/new value is null (unlike compute or merge). So "if now absent" is referring to the state before calling the method. – user1589188 Sep 18 '17 at 7:44
0

Actual code from javadoc:

 if (map.get(key) == null) {
 V newValue = mappingFunction.apply(key);
     if (newValue != null)
         map.put(key, newValue);  // <-
     }
 }

As you can see there is no return keyword in the marked line.

Section "return" also says:

Returns: the current (existing or computed) value associated with the specified key, or null if the computed value is null

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