106

Is there a way to pass additional argument to my custom AndroidViewModel constructor except Application context. Example:

public class MyViewModel extends AndroidViewModel {
    private final LiveData<List<MyObject>> myObjectList;
    private AppDatabase appDatabase;

    public MyViewModel(Application application, String param) {
        super(application);
        appDatabase = AppDatabase.getDatabase(this.getApplication());

        myObjectList = appDatabase.myOjectModel().getMyObjectByParam(param);
    }
}

And when I want to user my custom ViewModel class I use this code in my fragment:

MyViewModel myViewModel = ViewModelProvider.of(this).get(MyViewModel.class)

So I don't know how to pass additional argument String param into my custom ViewModel. I can only pass Application context, but not additional arguments. I would really appreciate any help. Thank you.

Edit: I've added some code. I hope it's better now.

  • add more details and code – hugo Sep 18 '17 at 17:25
  • What's the error message? – Moses Aprico Sep 18 '17 at 20:42
  • There is no error message. I simply don't know where to set arguments for constructor as ViewModelProvider is used for creating AndroidViewModel objects. – Mario Rudman Sep 18 '17 at 21:25
210

You need to have a factory class for your ViewModel.

public class MyViewModelFactory implements ViewModelProvider.Factory {
    private Application mApplication;
    private String mParam;


    public MyViewModelFactory(Application application, String param) {
        mApplication = application;
        mParam = param;
    }


    @Override
    public <T extends ViewModel> T create(Class<T> modelClass) {
        return (T) new MyViewModel(mApplication, mParam);
    }
}

And when instantiating the view model, you do like this:

MyViewModel myViewModel = ViewModelProvider(this, new MyViewModelFactory(this.getApplication(), "my awesome param")).get(MyViewModel.class);

For kotlin, you may use delegated property:

val viewModel: MyViewModel by viewModels { MyViewModelFactory(getApplication(), "my awesome param") }

There's also another new option - to implement HasDefaultViewModelProviderFactory and override getDefaultViewModelProviderFactory() with the instantiation of your factory and then you would call ViewModelProvider(this) or by viewModels() without the factory.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Does every ViewModel class need its ViewModelFactory? – dmlebron Mar 16 '18 at 15:12
  • 6
    but every ViewModel could/will have different DI. How would you know which instance return on the create() method? – dmlebron Mar 17 '18 at 18:18
  • 1
    Your ViewModel will be recreated after change orientation. Your cant create factory every time. – Tim Aug 2 '18 at 17:57
  • 3
    That's not true. New ViewModel creation prevents method get(). Based on documentation: "Returns an existing ViewModel or creates a new one in the scope (usually, a fragment or an activity), associated with this ViewModelProvider." see: developer.android.com/reference/android/arch/lifecycle/… – mlyko Aug 3 '18 at 9:05
  • 2
    how about using return modelClass.cast(new MyViewModel(mApplication, mParam)) to get rid of the warning – jackycflau Nov 21 '18 at 6:52
22

Implement with Dependency Injection

This is more advanced and better for production code.

Dagger2, Square's AssistedInject offers a production-ready implementation for ViewModels that can inject necessary components such as a repository that handles network and database requests. It also allows for the manual injection of arguments/parameters in the activity/fragment. Here's a concise outline of the steps to implement with code Gists based on Gabor Varadi's detailed post, Dagger Tips.

Dagger Hilt, is the next generation solution, in alpha as of 7/12/20, offering the same use case with a simpler setup once the library is in release status.

Implement with Lifecycle 2.2.0 in Kotlin

Passing Arguments/Parameters

// Override ViewModelProvider.NewInstanceFactory to create the ViewModel (VM).
class SomeViewModelFactory(private val someString: String): ViewModelProvider.NewInstanceFactory() {
    override fun <T : ViewModel?> create(modelClass: Class<T>): T = SomeViewModel(someString) as T
} 

class SomeViewModel(private val someString: String) : ViewModel() {
    init {
        //TODO: Use 'someString' to init process when VM is created. i.e. Get data request.
    }
}

class Fragment: Fragment() {
    // Create VM in activity/fragment with VM factory.
    val someViewModel: SomeViewModel by viewModels { SomeViewModelFactory("someString") } 
}

Enabling SavedState with Arguments/Parameters

class SomeViewModelFactory(
        private val owner: SavedStateRegistryOwner,
        private val someString: String) : AbstractSavedStateViewModelFactory(owner, null) {
    override fun <T : ViewModel?> create(key: String, modelClass: Class<T>, state: SavedStateHandle) =
            SomeViewModel(state, someString) as T
}

class SomeViewModel(private val state: SavedStateHandle, private val someString: String) : ViewModel() {
    val feedPosition = state.get<Int>(FEED_POSITION_KEY).let { position ->
        if (position == null) 0 else position
    }
        
    init {
        //TODO: Use 'someString' to init process when VM is created. i.e. Get data request.
    }
        
     fun saveFeedPosition(position: Int) {
        state.set(FEED_POSITION_KEY, position)
    }
}

class Fragment: Fragment() {
    // Create VM in activity/fragment with VM factory.
    val someViewModel: SomeViewModel by viewModels { SomeViewModelFactory(this, "someString") } 
    private var feedPosition: Int = 0
     
    override fun onSaveInstanceState(outState: Bundle) {
        super.onSaveInstanceState(outState)
        someViewModel.saveFeedPosition((contentRecyclerView.layoutManager as LinearLayoutManager)
                .findFirstVisibleItemPosition())
    }    
        
    override fun onViewStateRestored(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
        super.onViewStateRestored(savedInstanceState)
        feedPosition = someViewModel.feedPosition
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • While overriding create in the factory I get a warning saying Unchecked cast 'ItemViewModel to T' – Ssenyonjo May 6 at 21:15
  • 1
    That warning has not been an issue for me so far. However, I will look into it further when I refactor the ViewModel factory to inject it using Dagger rather than creating an instance of it via the fragment. – Adam Hurwitz May 20 at 5:26
15

For one factory shared between multiple different view models I'd extend mlyko's answer like this:

public class MyViewModelFactory extends ViewModelProvider.NewInstanceFactory {
    private Application mApplication;
    private Object[] mParams;

    public MyViewModelFactory(Application application, Object... params) {
        mApplication = application;
        mParams = params;
    }

    @Override
    public <T extends ViewModel> T create(Class<T> modelClass) {
        if (modelClass == ViewModel1.class) {
            return (T) new ViewModel1(mApplication, (String) mParams[0]);
        } else if (modelClass == ViewModel2.class) {
            return (T) new ViewModel2(mApplication, (Integer) mParams[0]);
        } else if (modelClass == ViewModel3.class) {
            return (T) new ViewModel3(mApplication, (Integer) mParams[0], (String) mParams[1]);
        } else {
            return super.create(modelClass);
        }
    }
}

And instantiating view models:

ViewModel1 vm1 = ViewModelProviders.of(this, new MyViewModelFactory(getApplication(), "something")).get(ViewModel1.class);
ViewModel2 vm2 = ViewModelProviders.of(this, new MyViewModelFactory(getApplication(), 123)).get(ViewModel2.class);
ViewModel3 vm3 = ViewModelProviders.of(this, new MyViewModelFactory(getApplication(), 123, "something")).get(ViewModel3.class);

With different view models having different constructors.

| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    I don't recommend this way because couple of reasons: 1) parameters in factory are not type safe - this way you can break your code on runtime. Always try to avoid this approach when possible 2) checking view model types is not really OOP way of doing things. Since the ViewModels are casted to base type, again you can break code during runtime without any warning during compilation.. In this case I'd suggest using default android factory and pass the parameters to already instantiated view model. – mlyko May 17 '18 at 17:56
  • @mlyko Sure, these are all valid objections and own method(s) to set up the viewmodel data is always an option. But sometimes you want to make sure that viewmodel has been initialized, hence the use of constructor. Otherwise you must yourself handle situation "viewmodel not initialized yet". For example if viewmodel has methods that return LivedData and observers are attached to that in various View lifecycle methods. – rzehan Jun 12 '18 at 10:24
3

Based on @vilpe89 the above Kotlin solution for AndroidViewModel cases

class ExtraParamsViewModelFactory(private val application: Application, private val myExtraParam: String): ViewModelProvider.NewInstanceFactory() {
override fun <T : ViewModel?> create(modelClass: Class<T>): T = SomeViewModel(application, myExtraParam) as T

}

Then a fragment can initiate the viewModel as

class SomeFragment : Fragment() {
 ....
    private val myViewModel: SomeViewModel by viewModels {
        ExtraParamsViewModelFactory(this.requireActivity().application, "some string value")
    }
 ....
}

And then the actual ViewModel class

class SomeViewModel(application: Application, val myExtraParam:String) : AndroidViewModel(application) {
....
}

Or in some suitable method ...

override fun onActivityCreated(...){
    ....

    val myViewModel = ViewModelProvider(this, ExtraParamsViewModelFactory(this.requireActivity().application, "some string value")).get(SomeViewModel::class.java)

    ....
}
| improve this answer | |
  • The question asks how to pass arguments/parameters without using context which the above does not follow: Is there a way to pass additional argument to my custom AndroidViewModel constructor except Application context? – Adam Hurwitz Jul 12 at 18:06
3

I made it a class in which the already created object is passed.

private Map<String, ViewModel> viewModelMap;

public ViewModelFactory() {
    this.viewModelMap = new HashMap<>();
}

public void add(ViewModel viewModel) {
    viewModelMap.put(viewModel.getClass().getCanonicalName(), viewModel);
}

@NonNull
@Override
public <T extends ViewModel> T create(@NonNull Class<T> modelClass) {
    for (Map.Entry<String, ViewModel> viewModel : viewModelMap.entrySet()) {
        if (viewModel.getKey().equals(modelClass.getCanonicalName())) {
            return (T) viewModel.getValue();
        }
    }
    return null;
}

And then

ViewModelFactory viewModelFactory = new ViewModelFactory();
viewModelFactory.add(new SampleViewModel(arg1, arg2));
SampleViewModel sampleViewModel = ViewModelProviders.of(this, viewModelFactory).get(SampleViewModel.class);
| improve this answer | |
  • We should have a ViewModelFactory for every ViewModel to pass the parameters to the constructor ?? – K Pradeep Kumar Reddy Jul 20 at 10:55
  • No. Only one ViewModelFactory for all ViewModels – Danil Jul 20 at 15:00
  • Is there any reason for using canonical name as the hashMap key ? Can i use class.simpleName ? – K Pradeep Kumar Reddy Jul 20 at 17:42
  • Yes, but you must make sure there are no duplicate names – Danil Jul 22 at 12:34
  • Is this the recommended style of writing the code ? You came up with this code on your own or you read it in android docs ? – K Pradeep Kumar Reddy Jul 22 at 16:42
1

I wrote a library that should make doing this more straightforward and way cleaner, no multibindings or factory boilerplate needed, while working seamlessly with ViewModel arguments that can be provided as dependencies by Dagger: https://github.com/radutopor/ViewModelFactory

@ViewModelFactory
class UserViewModel(@Provided repository: Repository, userId: Int) : ViewModel() {

    val greeting = MutableLiveData<String>()

    init {
        val user = repository.getUser(userId)
        greeting.value = "Hello, $user.name"
    }    
}

In the view:

class UserActivity : AppCompatActivity() {
    @Inject
    lateinit var userViewModelFactory2: UserViewModelFactory2

    override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState)
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_user)
        appComponent.inject(this)

        val userId = intent.getIntExtra("USER_ID", -1)
        val viewModel = ViewModelProviders.of(this, userViewModelFactory2.create(userId))
            .get(UserViewModel::class.java)

        viewModel.greeting.observe(this, Observer { greetingText ->
            greetingTextView.text = greetingText
        })
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

(KOTLIN) My solution uses little bit of Reflection.

Lets say you don't want to create the same looking Factory class every time you create new ViewModel class which needs some arguments. You can accomplish this via Reflection.

For example you would have two different Activities:

class Activity1 : FragmentActivity() {
    override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState)

        val args = Bundle().apply { putString("NAME_KEY", "Vilpe89") }
        val viewModel = ViewModelProviders.of(this, ViewModelWithArgumentsFactory(args))
            .get(ViewModel1::class.java)
    }
}

class Activity2 : FragmentActivity() {
    override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState)

        val args = Bundle().apply { putInt("AGE_KEY", 29) }
        val viewModel = ViewModelProviders.of(this, ViewModelWithArgumentsFactory(args))
            .get(ViewModel2::class.java)
    }
}

And ViewModels for those Activities:

class ViewModel1(private val args: Bundle) : ViewModel()

class ViewModel2(private val args: Bundle) : ViewModel()

Then the magic part, Factory class's implementation:

class ViewModelWithArgumentsFactory(private val args: Bundle) : NewInstanceFactory() {
    override fun <T : ViewModel?> create(modelClass: Class<T>): T {
        try {
            val constructor: Constructor<T> = modelClass.getDeclaredConstructor(Bundle::class.java)
            return constructor.newInstance(args)
        } catch (e: Exception) {
            Timber.e(e, "Could not create new instance of class %s", modelClass.canonicalName)
            throw e
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Why not do it like this:

public class MyViewModel extends AndroidViewModel {
    private final LiveData<List<MyObject>> myObjectList;
    private AppDatabase appDatabase;
    private boolean initialized = false;

    public MyViewModel(Application application) {
        super(application);
    }

    public initialize(String param){
      synchronized ("justInCase") {
         if(! initialized){
          initialized = true;
          appDatabase = AppDatabase.getDatabase(this.getApplication());
          myObjectList = appDatabase.myOjectModel().getMyObjectByParam(param);
    }
   }
  }
}

and then use it like this in two steps:

MyViewModel myViewModel = ViewModelProvider.of(this).get(MyViewModel.class)
myViewModel.initialize(param)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    The whole point of putting parameters in the constructor is to initialize the view model only once. With your implementation, if you call myViewModel.initialize(param) in onCreate of the activity, for example, it can be called multiple times on the same MyViewModel instance as the user rotates the device. – Sanlok Lee Mar 4 '19 at 21:45
  • @Sanlok Lee Ok. How about adding a condition to the function to prevent initializing when unnecessary. Check my edited answer. – Amr Berag Mar 5 '19 at 4:37
0
class UserViewModelFactory(private val context: Context) : ViewModelProvider.NewInstanceFactory() {
 
    override fun <T : ViewModel?> create(modelClass: Class<T>): T {
        return UserViewModel(context) as T
    }
 
}
class UserViewModel(private val context: Context) : ViewModel() {
 
    private var listData = MutableLiveData<ArrayList<User>>()
 
    init{
        val userRepository : UserRepository by lazy {
            UserRepository
        }
        if(context.isInternetAvailable()) {
            listData = userRepository.getMutableLiveData(context)
        }
    }
 
    fun getData() : MutableLiveData<ArrayList<User>>{
        return listData
    }

Call Viewmodel in Activity

val userViewModel = ViewModelProviders.of(this,UserViewModelFactory(this)).get(UserViewModel::class.java)

For more reference: Android MVVM Kotlin Example

| improve this answer | |
  • The question asks how to pass arguments/parameters without using context which the above does not follow: Is there a way to pass additional argument to my custom AndroidViewModel constructor except Application context? – Adam Hurwitz Jul 12 at 18:05
  • You can pass any argument/parameter in your custom viewmodel constructor. Here context is just an example. You can pass any custom argument in constructor. – Dhrumil Shah Jul 16 at 9:41
  • Understood. It is best practice to not pass context, views, activities, fragments, adapters, view Lifecycle, observe view lifecycle-aware observables or hold resources (drawables, etc) in the ViewModel as the view may be destroyed and the ViewModel will persist with outdated information. – Adam Hurwitz Jul 16 at 17:31

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