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I am having trouble understanding how interrupt signals send to the CPU affect all the processes which are scheduled and executed concurrently. I am not sure about to details of of how the process scheduling mechanism works yet since I haven't reached that chapter, which might be where to confusion is coming from.

When an event causes an interrupt the CPU saves its context (i.e Proccess status word registers+ perhaps GPR) and starts the interrupt servicing routine. After the ISR is done, its loads back the state of the program that was interrupted so that it can continue.

  1. How does the CPU know which program to interrupt?

  2. Do all the programs currently running come to a halt during the execution of the IRS? or do all the other process keep running, i.e, running concurrently with the IRS include in the queue?

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How does the CPU know which program to interrupt

The CPU doesn't know, or need to. When a CPU receives an interrupt what ever thread is currently running on that core stops executing. With a properly designed ISR, the thread that was interrupted is completely unaware that execution ever stopped*. Generally interrupts are sent to a specific core. The interrupts will not try to interrupt a specific process or thread unless software happened to set the affinity to match that of the core getting interrupted, and the thread happened to be running. On that note, part of efficient OS design on multicore systems is configuring the hardware to spread the interrupts sources out to different cores, so that one core isn't constantly interrupted.

*Detecting an interrupt has occurred while running a program is tricky and you often rely upon knowing how long uninterrupted execution occurs. In the event many spurious(false positive for lack of a better phrase) interrupts are occurring a side effect is that a program will run noticeably slower.

Do all the programs currently running come to a halt during the execution of the IRS? or do all the other process keep running, i.e, running concurrently with the IRS include in the queue?

Interrupts are generally events that must be serviced immediately. Scheduling them would defeat the purpose. Hence, ISRs do not get added to the scheduler queues. Infact, what often triggers the scheduler to execute in the first place is an interrupt from a hardware timer. In multicore systems, the threads that were not interrupted will continue to execute as one core services an interrupt.

What many interrupts may do is trigger a semaphore to causes a thread to unblock and begin execution because of an event. This is a common way of signalling to a thread that data is ready for handling from a SATA or network interface card. Typically this is done because actually parsing a packet, for example, would be slow. ISR need to be fast so they simply off load the slow CPU intensive work to a thread.

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