6

I am trying to make use of lambdas in Java but can't understand how it works at all. I created @FunctionalInterface like this:

@FunctionalInterface
public interface MyFunctionalInterface {
    String getString(String s);
}

now in my code I use the lambda as here:

MyFunctionalInterface function = (f) -> {
    Date d = new Date();
    return d.toString() + " " + person.name + " used fnc str";
};

Next, I want to make use of my function passing it into the constructor of another class and use it like this:

public SampleClass(MyFunctionalInterface function) {
    String tmp = "The person info: %s";
    this.result = String.format(tmp, function.getString(String.valueOf(function)));
}

Why I need to use it the valueOf() here? I thought that thanks for this I could use just function.getString()?

Output: Tue Sep 19 11:04:48 CEST 2017 John used fnc str

4
  • Your function takes a String as a parameter. Reading your string format, you should pass the person info as a String to it. Right now, you are passing the string representation of the function itself, to the function.
    – marstran
    Sep 19, 2017 at 9:00
  • It is not really clear what you are trying to achieve. I would have expected that lambda definition in the place where you use function. Or that you use a method reference. I think the code you have right now will turn the OBJECT that function also represents and create a string representation of that, which is then passed as input to the function itself. Simply doesn't make sense.
    – GhostCat
    Sep 19, 2017 at 9:01
  • What is the output of this code?
    – jrook
    Sep 19, 2017 at 9:01
  • @jrook added output
    – shurrok
    Sep 19, 2017 at 9:06

1 Answer 1

5

Your getString method requires a String argument, so you can't call it without any argument.

That said, your lambda expression ignores that String argument and instead takes data from some person variable (which you didn't show where you declare it).

Perhaps your functional interface should take a Person argument instead:

@FunctionalInterface
public interface MyFunctionalInterface {
    String getString(Person p);
}

MyFunctionalInterface function = p -> {
    Date d = new Date();
    return d.toString() + " " + p.name + " used fnc str";
};

public SampleClass(MyFunctionalInterface function, Person person) {
    String tmp = "The person info: %s";
    this.result = String.format(tmp, function.getString(person));
}

Alternately, you can remove the argument from your functional interface's method:

@FunctionalInterface
public interface MyFunctionalInterface {
    String getString();
}

MyFunctionalInterface function = () -> {
    Date d = new Date();
    return d.toString() + " " + person.name + " used fnc str";
};

public SampleClass(MyFunctionalInterface function) {
    String tmp = "The person info: %s";
    this.result = String.format(tmp, function.getString());
}
7
  • Hmm, I cannot pass there a specific object because I would like to format many of them with this Inerface, not just a person (e.g car, animal and so on)
    – shurrok
    Sep 19, 2017 at 9:07
  • @soommy12 In that case, perhaps you can make the functional interface generic - interface MyFunctionalInterface<T>. Of course, if you intend to use specific properties such as p.name, you will have to place some type bound on T (<T extends SomeType> where SomeType is a class that has a name property). Otherwise, you can remove the argument from the getString() method (and from your lambda expression), and keep everything else as is.
    – Eran
    Sep 19, 2017 at 9:11
  • 1
    @soommy12 Of course you can. For example - MyFunctionalInterface function = () -> { Date d = new Date(); return d.toString() + " " + person.name + " used fnc str"; };
    – Eran
    Sep 19, 2017 at 9:24
  • 1
    @soommy12 I added that to the answer.
    – Eran
    Sep 19, 2017 at 9:36
  • 1
    @soommy12 Note that many simple functional interfaces are already provided for you in the java.util.function package. The standard interface that consumes nothing but returns a value is Supplier<T>. You need not write your own. Sep 19, 2017 at 10:24

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