2

I have a button that looks like this:

<button type="button">
    Remove
</button>

Contextually, users who can see will be able to tell that the button is referring to a specific product that they can remove. However, for users with a vision disability, the text "Remove" isn't enough information to be helpful with regards to what they're removing.

I know that aria-label is, according to the MDN web docs, supposed to be used as follows:

Use it in cases where a text label is not visible on the screen

I also know that aria-labelledby is supposed to be used to associate other markup with the element being labeled. However, in the case of my button, the button itself contains the label. It just so happens that the label itself is not descriptive enough.

At this point, you may be asking why I don't just change the button text! It just so happens that the UX team doesn't want to change the visible button text, so I'm left trying to figure out the accessibility for the button without changing the visible part of the button.

Anyhow, is there a defined spec on what to do in this type of situation? My inclination is to use aria-label, but I'm not positive that is ARIA-compliant per se.

Thanks in advance!

2

Anyhow, is there a defined spec on what to do in this type of situation? My inclination is to use aria-label, but I'm not positive that is ARIA-compliant per se.

Yes you can.

The aria-label attribute will be used and will replace the inner text.

Specs for text Alternative Computation do define that aria-label will be used in priority (in step 2C) while the content will be used only if not present (step 2F)

2

Yes, you can use aria-label. Usually it takes priority over visible text or text inside the element (true with JFW, NVDA, VO in most cases except when custom settings have been set).

<button aria-label="Remove article XYZ">Remove</button>

As with alt attribute for images, make sure the aria-label is sufficient per ce, i.e. the visible text or text inside the element will very probably not be spoken, it is completely replaced by the aria-label. For our example here, the word "Remove" must be present in the label.

As an alternative instead of aria-label, you may also use a CSS class to make text be spoken only by screen readers:

<button>Remove <span class="sr-only">XYZ</span></button>

You will find the corresponding CSS code in frameworks like bootstrap. IN this case, both the visible text and the screen reader specific text are spoken one after the other. Make sure that words aren't glued together, otherwise there could be pronounciation issues.

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