This is homework, although it's already submitted with a different approach.

I'm getting the following from Visual Studio 2008

error C2893: Failed to specialize function template 'void std::sort(_RanIt,_RanIt,_Pr)'

The code is as follows

main.cpp
    Database<> db; 
    db.loadDatabase();
    db.sortDatabase(sort_by_title());  

Database.cpp
void Database<C>::sortDatabase(const sort_by &s) { 
    std::sort(db_.begin(), db_.end(), s); 
}

And the function objects are defined as

struct sort_by : public std::binary_function<const Media *, const Media *, bool> { 
    virtual bool operator()(const Media *l, const Media *r) const = 0;
};

struct sort_by_title : public sort_by {
    bool operator()(const Media *l, const Media *r) const { ... }
};
...

What's the cure here?

[Edit] Sorry, maybe I should have made the inheritance clear

template <typename C = std::vector<Media *> >
class Database : public IDatabase<C> 

[/Edit]

[Edit2]
After the suggestion from Toolbox (which seemed very reasonable) I ended up with the following error message

error C2664: 'Database<>::sortMedia' : cannot convert parameter 1 from 'sort_by_title' to 'const sort_by &'

main.cpp is still the same, but with some slight modifications to the functor hierarchy and source files. Forward declarations and such did not work so I had to put the definitions in separate files.

Search.h
struct sort_by_impl {
    virtual bool operator()(const Media *l, const Media *r) const = 0;
};
struct sort_by : public std::binary_function<const Media *, const Media *, bool> { 
    sort_by_impl *sbp;
    bool operator()(const Media *l, const Media *r) const {
        return (*sbp)(l, r);
    }
};

IDatabase.h
struct sort_by_title : public sort_by_impl {
    bool operator()(const Media *l, const Media *r) const {
        return (l->getTitle() < r->getTitle());
    }
};

I'm really not grokking this, what am I missing here? Some conversion operation, or what?
[/Edit2]

[Edit3]
Last and final edit, I hope. I actually got this working after debugging and rewriting some of the code. This is what I ended up with, and it's the best I could do

class sort_by : public std::binary_function<const Media *, const Media *, bool> { 
public:
    sort_by(sort_by_impl *sbp) : sbp_(sbp) {};
    bool operator()(const Media *l, const Media *r) const {
        return (*sbp_)(l, r);
    }
private:
    sort_by_impl *sbp_;
};

main.cpp
    db.sortDatabase(&sort_by_title());

Database.cpp
void Database<C>::sortDatabase(const sort_by &s) { 
    std::sort(db_.begin(), db_.end(), s); 

This seems to work, both in a separate project (spending the better part of this day messing with this) and in my actual project which I submitted some days ago.
Thank you very much for your time and help!
[/Edit3]

  • 2
    What is the type of db_? – Puppy Jan 7 '11 at 22:49
  • Perhaps it's an aspect of templates that I'm unfamiliar with, but don't you need to provide some template arguments in the first line? Database<> db; – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 7 '11 at 22:59
  • Oli, the template is specialized in the derived class. IDatabase should be considered an interface/abstract base class where the derived class implements the methods for the specific type - std::list, std::vector or ... C is a member in IDatabase (the internal container) – citizencane Jan 7 '11 at 23:17
  • @citizencane So just to be clear... are you both deriving IDatabase and specialising the template class IDatabase in one go? – user257111 Jan 8 '11 at 0:08
  • @Ninefingers, yes. I thought it would be a good idea to have IDatabase act as an interface and have the derived class supply the container and all operations specific for that container. – citizencane Jan 8 '11 at 13:32
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I'm not sure this is what's causing the problem, as it has nothing to do with specializing std::sort, but in sortDatabase you shouldn't be passing in a functor that's meant to behave polymorphically. The reason is that std::sort accepts your function object by value, which means it gets copied as a sort_by object, not whatever it actually is (i.e. you have a slicing problem).

If you want the function object to have a virtual operator(), the function object should hold a pointer to the polymorphic class like so:

struct sort_by : public std::binary_function<const Media*, const Media*, bool> {
    bool operator()(const Media *l, const Media *r) const
    {
        return (*p_impl)(l, r);
    }

    sort_by_impl* p_impl;
};

Then, sort_by_impl can be your abstract base class from which specific sorting function objects derive and override. Hope that helps.

EDIT

Based on the new error message, if I had to guess, you're trying to do something like this inside sortMedia:

Database<std::vector<Media*> > db; // initialized elsewhere...

sort_by_title my_sort;
db.sortDatabase(my_sort);

The problem is that my_sort is of type sort_by_title, which is a derived form of sort_by_impl - not of type sort_by. That means you actually want to pass my_sort to be the sbp pointer in a sort_by object, which is the actual function object you'll use. To illustrate:

Database<std::vector<Media*> > db; // initialized elsewhere...

sort_by my_sort_fn;
my_sort_fn.sbp = new sort_by_title;
db.sortDatabase(my_sort_fn);

delete my_sort_fn.sbp;

The code isn't exception safe, by the way; consider replacing sbp with a reference-counting smart pointer. Or even easier, just declare the sort_by_title on the stack and pass in its address. Just be careful not to let it be destroyed before it's used. :)

Hopefully that helps. Let me know how it turns out!

  • Thanks for your suggestion! I tried it, but I'm getting another error. I've tried to modify the code but I'm falling short here. Any other suggestions? I've edited my post. – citizencane Jan 8 '11 at 13:30
  • thank you very much - you've been very helpful! Solved and accepted. :-) – citizencane Jan 8 '11 at 21:45

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.