262

How would you go about testing all possible combinations of additions from a given set N of numbers so they add up to a given final number?

A brief example:

  • Set of numbers to add: N = {1,5,22,15,0,...}
  • Desired result: 12345
4
  • 9
    The wikipedia article (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subset_sum_problem) even mentions that this problem is a good introduction to the class of NP-complete problems. – user57368 Jan 8 '11 at 4:42
  • 6
    Can we use the same element of the original set more than once? For example if the input is {1,2,3,5} and target 10, is 5 + 5 = 10 an acceptable solution? – alampada Aug 23 '15 at 0:29
  • Just the once. If a whole number is to be repeated it appears as a new element. – James P. Sep 28 '15 at 4:20
  • 1
    stackoverflow.com/a/64380474/585411 shows how to use dynamic programming to avoid unnecessary work in producing answers. – btilly Oct 15 '20 at 22:26

32 Answers 32

275

This problem can be solved with a recursive combinations of all possible sums filtering out those that reach the target. Here is the algorithm in Python:

def subset_sum(numbers, target, partial=[]):
    s = sum(partial)

    # check if the partial sum is equals to target
    if s == target: 
        print "sum(%s)=%s" % (partial, target)
    if s >= target:
        return  # if we reach the number why bother to continue

    for i in range(len(numbers)):
        n = numbers[i]
        remaining = numbers[i+1:]
        subset_sum(remaining, target, partial + [n]) 


if __name__ == "__main__":
    subset_sum([3,9,8,4,5,7,10],15)

    #Outputs:
    #sum([3, 8, 4])=15
    #sum([3, 5, 7])=15
    #sum([8, 7])=15
    #sum([5, 10])=15

This type of algorithms are very well explained in the following Standford's Abstract Programming lecture - this video is very recommendable to understand how recursion works to generate permutations of solutions.

Edit

The above as a generator function, making it a bit more useful. Requires Python 3.3+ because of yield from.

def subset_sum(numbers, target, partial=[], partial_sum=0):
    if partial_sum == target:
        yield partial
    if partial_sum >= target:
        return
    for i, n in enumerate(numbers):
        remaining = numbers[i + 1:]
        yield from subset_sum(remaining, target, partial + [n], partial_sum + n)

Here is the Java version of the same algorithm:

package tmp;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;

class SumSet {
    static void sum_up_recursive(ArrayList<Integer> numbers, int target, ArrayList<Integer> partial) {
       int s = 0;
       for (int x: partial) s += x;
       if (s == target)
            System.out.println("sum("+Arrays.toString(partial.toArray())+")="+target);
       if (s >= target)
            return;
       for(int i=0;i<numbers.size();i++) {
             ArrayList<Integer> remaining = new ArrayList<Integer>();
             int n = numbers.get(i);
             for (int j=i+1; j<numbers.size();j++) remaining.add(numbers.get(j));
             ArrayList<Integer> partial_rec = new ArrayList<Integer>(partial);
             partial_rec.add(n);
             sum_up_recursive(remaining,target,partial_rec);
       }
    }
    static void sum_up(ArrayList<Integer> numbers, int target) {
        sum_up_recursive(numbers,target,new ArrayList<Integer>());
    }
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Integer[] numbers = {3,9,8,4,5,7,10};
        int target = 15;
        sum_up(new ArrayList<Integer>(Arrays.asList(numbers)),target);
    }
}

It is exactly the same heuristic. My Java is a bit rusty but I think is easy to understand.

C# conversion of Java solution: (by @JeremyThompson)

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<int> numbers = new List<int>() { 3, 9, 8, 4, 5, 7, 10 };
    int target = 15;
    sum_up(numbers, target);
}

private static void sum_up(List<int> numbers, int target)
{
    sum_up_recursive(numbers, target, new List<int>());
}

private static void sum_up_recursive(List<int> numbers, int target, List<int> partial)
{
    int s = 0;
    foreach (int x in partial) s += x;

    if (s == target)
        Console.WriteLine("sum(" + string.Join(",", partial.ToArray()) + ")=" + target);

    if (s >= target)
        return;

    for (int i = 0; i < numbers.Count; i++)
    {
        List<int> remaining = new List<int>();
        int n = numbers[i];
        for (int j = i + 1; j < numbers.Count; j++) remaining.Add(numbers[j]);

        List<int> partial_rec = new List<int>(partial);
        partial_rec.Add(n);
        sum_up_recursive(remaining, target, partial_rec);
    }
}

Ruby solution: (by @emaillenin)

def subset_sum(numbers, target, partial=[])
  s = partial.inject 0, :+
# check if the partial sum is equals to target

  puts "sum(#{partial})=#{target}" if s == target

  return if s >= target # if we reach the number why bother to continue

  (0..(numbers.length - 1)).each do |i|
    n = numbers[i]
    remaining = numbers.drop(i+1)
    subset_sum(remaining, target, partial + [n])
  end
end

subset_sum([3,9,8,4,5,7,10],15)

Edit: complexity discussion

As others mention this is an NP-hard problem. It can be solved in exponential time O(2^n), for instance for n=10 there will be 1024 possible solutions. If the targets you are trying to reach are in a low range then this algorithm works. So for instance:

subset_sum([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10],100000) generates 1024 branches because the target never gets to filter out possible solutions.

On the other hand subset_sum([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10],10) generates only 175 branches, because the target to reach 10 gets to filter out many combinations.

If N and Target are big numbers one should move into an approximate version of the solution.

14
  • 1
    Java optimization: ArrayList<Integer> partial_rec = new ArrayList<Integer>(partial); partial_rec.add(n); this does a copy of partial. and thus adds O(N). A better way is to just "partial.add(n)" do the recursion and then "partial.remove(partial.size -1). I reran your code to make sure. It works fine – Christian Bongiorno Apr 20 '15 at 0:10
  • 4
    This solution does not work for all cases. Consider [1, 2, 0, 6, -3, 3], 3 - it only outputs [1,2], [0,3], [3] while missing cases such as [6, -3, 3] – LiraNuna Mar 11 '16 at 19:25
  • 11
    It also doesn't work for every combination, for example [1, 2, 5], 5 only outputs [5], when [1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [2, 2, 1] and [2, 1, 1, 1] are solutions. – cbrad Jun 10 '16 at 23:18
  • 4
    @cbrad that is because of i+1 in remaining = numbers[i+1:]. It looks like that algorithm doesn't allow duplicates. – Leonid Vasilev May 8 '18 at 9:16
  • 1
    @cbrad To get also solutions including duplicates like [1, 1, 3] have a look at stackoverflow.com/a/34971783/3684296 (Python) – Mesa May 25 '18 at 20:17
37

The solution of this problem has been given a million times on the Internet. The problem is called The coin changing problem. One can find solutions at http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Count_the_coins and mathematical model of it at http://jaqm.ro/issues/volume-5,issue-2/pdfs/patterson_harmel.pdf (or Google coin change problem).

By the way, the Scala solution by Tsagadai, is interesting. This example produces either 1 or 0. As a side effect, it lists on the console all possible solutions. It displays the solution, but fails making it usable in any way.

To be as useful as possible, the code should return a List[List[Int]]in order to allow getting the number of solution (length of the list of lists), the "best" solution (the shortest list), or all the possible solutions.

Here is an example. It is very inefficient, but it is easy to understand.

object Sum extends App {

  def sumCombinations(total: Int, numbers: List[Int]): List[List[Int]] = {

    def add(x: (Int, List[List[Int]]), y: (Int, List[List[Int]])): (Int, List[List[Int]]) = {
      (x._1 + y._1, x._2 ::: y._2)
    }

    def sumCombinations(resultAcc: List[List[Int]], sumAcc: List[Int], total: Int, numbers: List[Int]): (Int, List[List[Int]]) = {
      if (numbers.isEmpty || total < 0) {
        (0, resultAcc)
      } else if (total == 0) {
        (1, sumAcc :: resultAcc)
      } else {
        add(sumCombinations(resultAcc, sumAcc, total, numbers.tail), sumCombinations(resultAcc, numbers.head :: sumAcc, total - numbers.head, numbers))
      }
    }

    sumCombinations(Nil, Nil, total, numbers.sortWith(_ > _))._2
  }

  println(sumCombinations(15, List(1, 2, 5, 10)) mkString "\n")
}

When run, it displays:

List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2)
List(1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2)
List(1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 5)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 5)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 5)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 5)
List(1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 5)
List(2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 5)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 5, 5)
List(1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 5)
List(1, 2, 2, 5, 5)
List(5, 5, 5)
List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 10)
List(1, 1, 1, 2, 10)
List(1, 2, 2, 10)
List(5, 10)

The sumCombinations() function may be used by itself, and the result may be further analyzed to display the "best" solution (the shortest list), or the number of solutions (the number of lists).

Note that even like this, the requirements may not be fully satisfied. It might happen that the order of each list in the solution be significant. In such a case, each list would have to be duplicated as many time as there are combination of its elements. Or we might be interested only in the combinations that are different.

For example, we might consider that List(5, 10) should give two combinations: List(5, 10) and List(10, 5). For List(5, 5, 5) it could give three combinations or one only, depending on the requirements. For integers, the three permutations are equivalent, but if we are dealing with coins, like in the "coin changing problem", they are not.

Also not stated in the requirements is the question of whether each number (or coin) may be used only once or many times. We could (and we should!) generalize the problem to a list of lists of occurrences of each number. This translates in real life into "what are the possible ways to make an certain amount of money with a set of coins (and not a set of coin values)". The original problem is just a particular case of this one, where we have as many occurrences of each coin as needed to make the total amount with each single coin value.

2
  • 15
    This problem is not exactly the same as the coin change problem. OP is asking for all combination, not just the minimal. And, presumably, the integers in the set can be negative. Hence, certain optimizations of the coin change problem are not possible with this problem. – ThomasMcLeod Mar 20 '13 at 14:24
  • 5
    and also this problem allows repetition of items, I'm not sure OP wanted this, but more a knapsack problem – caub Mar 25 '14 at 14:16
34

A Javascript version:

function subsetSum(numbers, target, partial) {
  var s, n, remaining;

  partial = partial || [];

  // sum partial
  s = partial.reduce(function (a, b) {
    return a + b;
  }, 0);

  // check if the partial sum is equals to target
  if (s === target) {
    console.log("%s=%s", partial.join("+"), target)
  }

  if (s >= target) {
    return;  // if we reach the number why bother to continue
  }

  for (var i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
    n = numbers[i];
    remaining = numbers.slice(i + 1);
    subsetSum(remaining, target, partial.concat([n]));
  }
}

subsetSum([3,9,8,4,5,7,10],15);

// output:
// 3+8+4=15
// 3+5+7=15
// 8+7=15
// 5+10=15

9
  • The code has a mistake in the slice, should be remaining = numbers.slice(); remaining.slice(i + 1); otherwise numbers.slice(i + 1); changes the numbers array – Emeeus Aug 30 '18 at 0:24
  • @Emeeus, I don't think that's true. slice returns a (shallow) copy, it does not modify the numbers array. – Dario Seidl Nov 12 '18 at 21:38
  • @DarioSeidl yes, slice returns a copy, it does not modify the array, that is the point, that is why if you don't assign it into a variable you don't change it. In this case, as I understand we have to pass a modified version, not the original. See this jsfiddle.net/che06t3w/1 – Emeeus Nov 13 '18 at 13:47
  • 2
    @Redu ... for example an easy way to do it is that, we can slightly modify the algorithm and use an inner-function: jsbin.com/lecokaw/edit?js,console – rbarilani Apr 2 '19 at 14:32
  • 2
    The code given doesn't necessarily get all the combinations.. e.g. putting [1,2],3 will only return 1 + 2 = 3 not 1 + 1 + 1 or 2 + 1 – user6913790 Aug 15 '19 at 10:33
34

In Haskell:

filter ((==) 12345 . sum) $ subsequences [1,5,22,15,0,..]

And J:

(]#~12345=+/@>)(]<@#~[:#:@i.2^#)1 5 22 15 0 ...

As you may notice, both take the same approach and divide the problem into two parts: generate each member of the power set, and check each member's sum to the target.

There are other solutions but this is the most straightforward.

Do you need help with either one, or finding a different approach?

3
  • 3
    Wow, that's some pretty concise code. I'm fine with your answer. I think I just need to read up a bit on algorithms in general. I'll have a look at the syntax of the two languages as you've sparked my curiosity. – James P. Jan 14 '11 at 8:44
  • I just installed Haskell to try this out, definitely can't just paste it in and have it execute, not in scope: 'subsequences' any pointers? – Hart CO Feb 6 '14 at 21:36
  • 4
    @HartCO a bit late to the party, but import Data.List – Jir Aug 14 '16 at 14:17
12

C# version of @msalvadores code answer

void Main()
{
    int[] numbers = {3,9,8,4,5,7,10};
    int target = 15;
    sum_up(new List<int>(numbers.ToList()),target);
}

static void sum_up_recursive(List<int> numbers, int target, List<int> part)
{
   int s = 0;
   foreach (int x in part)
   {
       s += x;
   }
   if (s == target)
   {
        Console.WriteLine("sum(" + string.Join(",", part.Select(n => n.ToString()).ToArray()) + ")=" + target);
   }
   if (s >= target)
   {
        return;
   }
   for (int i = 0;i < numbers.Count;i++)
   {
         var remaining = new List<int>();
         int n = numbers[i];
         for (int j = i + 1; j < numbers.Count;j++)
         {
             remaining.Add(numbers[j]);
         }
         var part_rec = new List<int>(part);
         part_rec.Add(n);
         sum_up_recursive(remaining,target,part_rec);
   }
}
static void sum_up(List<int> numbers, int target)
{
    sum_up_recursive(numbers,target,new List<int>());
}
0
12

C++ version of the same algorithm

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
void subset_sum_recursive(std::list<int> numbers, int target, std::list<int> partial)
{
        int s = 0;
        for (std::list<int>::const_iterator cit = partial.begin(); cit != partial.end(); cit++)
        {
            s += *cit;
        }
        if(s == target)
        {
                std::cout << "sum([";

                for (std::list<int>::const_iterator cit = partial.begin(); cit != partial.end(); cit++)
                {
                    std::cout << *cit << ",";
                }
                std::cout << "])=" << target << std::endl;
        }
        if(s >= target)
            return;
        int n;
        for (std::list<int>::const_iterator ai = numbers.begin(); ai != numbers.end(); ai++)
        {
            n = *ai;
            std::list<int> remaining;
            for(std::list<int>::const_iterator aj = ai; aj != numbers.end(); aj++)
            {
                if(aj == ai)continue;
                remaining.push_back(*aj);
            }
            std::list<int> partial_rec=partial;
            partial_rec.push_back(n);
            subset_sum_recursive(remaining,target,partial_rec);

        }
}

void subset_sum(std::list<int> numbers,int target)
{
    subset_sum_recursive(numbers,target,std::list<int>());
}
int main()
{
    std::list<int> a;
    a.push_back (3); a.push_back (9); a.push_back (8);
    a.push_back (4);
    a.push_back (5);
    a.push_back (7);
    a.push_back (10);
    int n = 15;
    //std::cin >> n;
    subset_sum(a, n);
    return 0;
}
5
Thank you.. ephemient

i have converted above logic from python to php..

<?php
$data = array(array(2,3,5,10,15),array(4,6,23,15,12),array(23,34,12,1,5));
$maxsum = 25;

print_r(bestsum($data,$maxsum));  //function call

function bestsum($data,$maxsum)
{
$res = array_fill(0, $maxsum + 1, '0');
$res[0] = array();              //base case
foreach($data as $group)
{
 $new_res = $res;               //copy res

  foreach($group as $ele)
  {
    for($i=0;$i<($maxsum-$ele+1);$i++)
    {   
        if($res[$i] != 0)
        {
            $ele_index = $i+$ele;
            $new_res[$ele_index] = $res[$i];
            $new_res[$ele_index][] = $ele;
        }
    }
  }

  $res = $new_res;
}

 for($i=$maxsum;$i>0;$i--)
  {
    if($res[$i]!=0)
    {
        return $res[$i];
        break;
    }
  }
return array();
}
?>
0
5

Another python solution would be to use the itertools.combinations module as follows:

#!/usr/local/bin/python

from itertools import combinations

def find_sum_in_list(numbers, target):
    results = []
    for x in range(len(numbers)):
        results.extend(
            [   
                combo for combo in combinations(numbers ,x)  
                    if sum(combo) == target
            ]   
        )   

    print results

if __name__ == "__main__":
    find_sum_in_list([3,9,8,4,5,7,10], 15)

Output: [(8, 7), (5, 10), (3, 8, 4), (3, 5, 7)]

3
  • it doesn't work eg: find_sum_in_list(range(0,8), 4). Found: [(4,), (0, 4), (1, 3), (0, 1, 3)] . But (2 , 2) is an option too! – Andre Araujo Dec 31 '18 at 0:50
  • @AndreAraujo: makes no sense to use 0, but if you use (1,8) then itertools.combinations_with_replacement works and also outputs 2,2. – Rubenisme Apr 3 '19 at 20:10
  • @Rubenisme Yes, man! The problem was the replacement! Thanks! ;-) – Andre Araujo Apr 7 '19 at 2:13
4

I thought I'd use an answer from this question but I couldn't, so here is my answer. It is using a modified version of an answer in Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. I think this is a better recursive solution and should please the purists more.

My answer is in Scala (and apologies if my Scala sucks, I've just started learning it). The findSumCombinations craziness is to sort and unique the original list for the recursion to prevent dupes.

def findSumCombinations(target: Int, numbers: List[Int]): Int = {
  cc(target, numbers.distinct.sortWith(_ < _), List())
}

def cc(target: Int, numbers: List[Int], solution: List[Int]): Int = {
  if (target == 0) {println(solution); 1 }
  else if (target < 0 || numbers.length == 0) 0
  else 
    cc(target, numbers.tail, solution) 
    + cc(target - numbers.head, numbers, numbers.head :: solution)
}

To use it:

 > findSumCombinations(12345, List(1,5,22,15,0,..))
 * Prints a whole heap of lists that will sum to the target *
4

Here's a solution in R

subset_sum = function(numbers,target,partial=0){
  if(any(is.na(partial))) return()
  s = sum(partial)
  if(s == target) print(sprintf("sum(%s)=%s",paste(partial[-1],collapse="+"),target))
  if(s > target) return()
  for( i in seq_along(numbers)){
    n = numbers[i]
    remaining = numbers[(i+1):length(numbers)]
    subset_sum(remaining,target,c(partial,n))
  }
}
3
  • I am searching for a solution in R, but this one doesn't work for me. For example, subset_sum(numbers = c(1:2), target = 5) returns "sum(1+2+2)=5". But combination 1+1+1+1+1 is missing. Setting targets to higher numbers (e.g. 20) is missing even more combinations. – Frederick Jun 13 '19 at 7:20
  • What you describe is not what the function is intended to return. Look at the accepted answer. The fact that 2 is repeated twice is an artifact of how R generates and subsets series, not intended behavior. – Mark Jun 13 '19 at 9:55
  • subset_sum(1:2, 4) should return no solutions because there is no combination of 1 and 2 that adds to 4. What needs to be added to my function is an escape if i is greater than the length of numbers – Mark Jun 13 '19 at 9:58
4

Java non-recursive version that simply keeps adding elements and redistributing them amongst possible values. 0's are ignored and works for fixed lists (what you're given is what you can play with) or a list of repeatable numbers.

import java.util.*;

public class TestCombinations {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ArrayList<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList(0, 1, 2, 2, 5, 10, 20));
        LinkedHashSet<Integer> targets = new LinkedHashSet<Integer>() {{
            add(4);
            add(10);
            add(25);
        }};

        System.out.println("## each element can appear as many times as needed");
        for (Integer target: targets) {
            Combinations combinations = new Combinations(numbers, target, true);
            combinations.calculateCombinations();
            for (String solution: combinations.getCombinations()) {
                System.out.println(solution);
            }
        }

        System.out.println("## each element can appear only once");
        for (Integer target: targets) {
            Combinations combinations = new Combinations(numbers, target, false);
            combinations.calculateCombinations();
            for (String solution: combinations.getCombinations()) {
                System.out.println(solution);
            }
        }
    }

    public static class Combinations {
        private boolean allowRepetitions;
        private int[] repetitions;
        private ArrayList<Integer> numbers;
        private Integer target;
        private Integer sum;
        private boolean hasNext;
        private Set<String> combinations;

        /**
         * Constructor.
         *
         * @param numbers Numbers that can be used to calculate the sum.
         * @param target  Target value for sum.
         */
        public Combinations(ArrayList<Integer> numbers, Integer target) {
            this(numbers, target, true);
        }

        /**
         * Constructor.
         *
         * @param numbers Numbers that can be used to calculate the sum.
         * @param target  Target value for sum.
         */
        public Combinations(ArrayList<Integer> numbers, Integer target, boolean allowRepetitions) {
            this.allowRepetitions = allowRepetitions;
            if (this.allowRepetitions) {
                Set<Integer> numbersSet = new HashSet<>(numbers);
                this.numbers = new ArrayList<>(numbersSet);
            } else {
                this.numbers = numbers;
            }
            this.numbers.removeAll(Arrays.asList(0));
            Collections.sort(this.numbers);

            this.target = target;
            this.repetitions = new int[this.numbers.size()];
            this.combinations = new LinkedHashSet<>();

            this.sum = 0;
            if (this.repetitions.length > 0)
                this.hasNext = true;
            else
                this.hasNext = false;
        }

        /**
         * Calculate and return the sum of the current combination.
         *
         * @return The sum.
         */
        private Integer calculateSum() {
            this.sum = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < repetitions.length; ++i) {
                this.sum += repetitions[i] * numbers.get(i);
            }
            return this.sum;
        }

        /**
         * Redistribute picks when only one of each number is allowed in the sum.
         */
        private void redistribute() {
            for (int i = 1; i < this.repetitions.length; ++i) {
                if (this.repetitions[i - 1] > 1) {
                    this.repetitions[i - 1] = 0;
                    this.repetitions[i] += 1;
                }
            }
            if (this.repetitions[this.repetitions.length - 1] > 1)
                this.repetitions[this.repetitions.length - 1] = 0;
        }

        /**
         * Get the sum of the next combination. When 0 is returned, there's no other combinations to check.
         *
         * @return The sum.
         */
        private Integer next() {
            if (this.hasNext && this.repetitions.length > 0) {
                this.repetitions[0] += 1;
                if (!this.allowRepetitions)
                    this.redistribute();
                this.calculateSum();

                for (int i = 0; i < this.repetitions.length && this.sum != 0; ++i) {
                    if (this.sum > this.target) {
                        this.repetitions[i] = 0;
                        if (i + 1 < this.repetitions.length) {
                            this.repetitions[i + 1] += 1;
                            if (!this.allowRepetitions)
                                this.redistribute();
                        }
                        this.calculateSum();
                    }
                }

                if (this.sum.compareTo(0) == 0)
                    this.hasNext = false;
            }
            return this.sum;
        }

        /**
         * Calculate all combinations whose sum equals target.
         */
        public void calculateCombinations() {
            while (this.hasNext) {
                if (this.next().compareTo(target) == 0)
                    this.combinations.add(this.toString());
            }
        }

        /**
         * Return all combinations whose sum equals target.
         *
         * @return Combinations as a set of strings.
         */
        public Set<String> getCombinations() {
            return this.combinations;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder("" + sum + ": ");
            for (int i = 0; i < repetitions.length; ++i) {
                for (int j = 0; j < repetitions[i]; ++j) {
                    stringBuilder.append(numbers.get(i) + " ");
                }
            }
            return stringBuilder.toString();
        }
    }
}

Sample input:

numbers: 0, 1, 2, 2, 5, 10, 20
targets: 4, 10, 25

Sample output:

## each element can appear as many times as needed
4: 1 1 1 1 
4: 1 1 2 
4: 2 2 
10: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
10: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 
10: 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 
10: 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 
10: 1 1 2 2 2 2 
10: 2 2 2 2 2 
10: 1 1 1 1 1 5 
10: 1 1 1 2 5 
10: 1 2 2 5 
10: 5 5 
10: 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 
25: 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 
25: 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 
25: 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 5 
25: 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 5 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 5 5 5 
25: 1 1 2 2 2 2 5 5 5 
25: 2 2 2 2 2 5 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 5 5 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 2 5 5 5 5 
25: 1 2 2 5 5 5 5 
25: 5 5 5 5 5 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 10 
25: 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 10 
25: 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 5 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 5 10 
25: 1 1 2 2 2 2 5 10 
25: 2 2 2 2 2 5 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 5 5 10 
25: 1 1 1 2 5 5 10 
25: 1 2 2 5 5 10 
25: 5 5 5 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 10 10 
25: 1 1 1 2 10 10 
25: 1 2 2 10 10 
25: 5 10 10 
25: 1 1 1 1 1 20 
25: 1 1 1 2 20 
25: 1 2 2 20 
25: 5 20 
## each element can appear only once
4: 2 2 
10: 1 2 2 5 
10: 10 
25: 1 2 2 20 
25: 5 20
3

Here is a Java version which is well suited for small N and very large target sum, when complexity O(t*N) (the dynamic solution) is greater than the exponential algorithm. My version uses a meet in the middle attack, along with a little bit shifting in order to reduce the complexity from the classic naive O(n*2^n) to O(2^(n/2)).

If you want to use this for sets with between 32 and 64 elements, you should change the int which represents the current subset in the step function to a long although performance will obviously drastically decrease as the set size increases. If you want to use this for a set with odd number of elements, you should add a 0 to the set to make it even numbered.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class SubsetSumMiddleAttack {
    static final int target = 100000000;
    static final int[] set = new int[]{ ... };

    static List<Subset> evens = new ArrayList<>();
    static List<Subset> odds = new ArrayList<>();

    static int[][] split(int[] superSet) {
        int[][] ret = new int[2][superSet.length / 2]; 

        for (int i = 0; i < superSet.length; i++) ret[i % 2][i / 2] = superSet[i];

        return ret;
    }

    static void step(int[] superSet, List<Subset> accumulator, int subset, int sum, int counter) {
        accumulator.add(new Subset(subset, sum));
        if (counter != superSet.length) {
            step(superSet, accumulator, subset + (1 << counter), sum + superSet[counter], counter + 1);
            step(superSet, accumulator, subset, sum, counter + 1);
        }
    }

    static void printSubset(Subset e, Subset o) {
        String ret = "";
        for (int i = 0; i < 32; i++) {
            if (i % 2 == 0) {
                if ((1 & (e.subset >> (i / 2))) == 1) ret += " + " + set[i];
            }
            else {
                if ((1 & (o.subset >> (i / 2))) == 1) ret += " + " + set[i];
            }
        }
        if (ret.startsWith(" ")) ret = ret.substring(3) + " = " + (e.sum + o.sum);
        System.out.println(ret);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[][] superSets = split(set);

        step(superSets[0], evens, 0,0,0);
        step(superSets[1], odds, 0,0,0);

        for (Subset e : evens) {
            for (Subset o : odds) {
                if (e.sum + o.sum == target) printSubset(e, o);
            }
        }
    }
}

class Subset {
    int subset;
    int sum;

    Subset(int subset, int sum) {
        this.subset = subset;
        this.sum = sum;
    }
}
3

Perl version (of the leading answer):

use strict;

sub subset_sum {
  my ($numbers, $target, $result, $sum) = @_;

  print 'sum('.join(',', @$result).") = $target\n" if $sum == $target;
  return if $sum >= $target;

  subset_sum([@$numbers[$_ + 1 .. $#$numbers]], $target, 
             [@{$result||[]}, $numbers->[$_]], $sum + $numbers->[$_])
    for (0 .. $#$numbers);
}

subset_sum([3,9,8,4,5,7,10,6], 15);

Result:

sum(3,8,4) = 15
sum(3,5,7) = 15
sum(9,6) = 15
sum(8,7) = 15
sum(4,5,6) = 15
sum(5,10) = 15

Javascript version:

const subsetSum = (numbers, target, partial = [], sum = 0) => {
  if (sum < target)
    numbers.forEach((num, i) =>
      subsetSum(numbers.slice(i + 1), target, partial.concat([num]), sum + num));
  else if (sum == target)
    console.log('sum(%s) = %s', partial.join(), target);
}

subsetSum([3,9,8,4,5,7,10,6], 15);

Javascript one-liner that actually returns results (instead of printing it):

const subsetSum=(n,t,p=[],s=0,r=[])=>(s<t?n.forEach((l,i)=>subsetSum(n.slice(i+1),t,[...p,l],s+l,r)):s==t?r.push(p):0,r);

console.log(subsetSum([3,9,8,4,5,7,10,6], 15));

And my favorite, one-liner with callback:

const subsetSum=(n,t,cb,p=[],s=0)=>s<t?n.forEach((l,i)=>subsetSum(n.slice(i+1),t,cb,[...p,l],s+l)):s==t?cb(p):0;

subsetSum([3,9,8,4,5,7,10,6], 15, console.log);

1
  • How would you make it work to get the closest sum combinations in case there is no exact sum result? hopefully in javascript – LaravDev Mar 20 at 14:08
2

This is similar to a coin change problem

public class CoinCount 
{   
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int[] coins={1,4,6,2,3,5};
    int count=0;

    for (int i=0;i<coins.length;i++)
    {
        count=count+Count(9,coins,i,0);
    }
    System.out.println(count);
}

public static int Count(int Sum,int[] coins,int index,int curSum)
{
    int count=0;

    if (index>=coins.length)
        return 0;

    int sumNow=curSum+coins[index];
    if (sumNow>Sum)
        return 0;
    if (sumNow==Sum)
        return 1;

    for (int i= index+1;i<coins.length;i++)
        count+=Count(Sum,coins,i,sumNow);

    return count;       
}
}
2

Very efficient algorithm using tables i wrote in c++ couple a years ago.

If you set PRINT 1 it will print all combinations(but it wont be use the efficient method).

Its so efficient that it calculate more than 10^14 combinations in less than 10ms.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
//#include "CTime.h"

#define SUM 300
#define MAXNUMsSIZE 30

#define PRINT 0


long long CountAddToSum(int,int[],int,const int[],int);
void printr(const int[], int);
long long table1[SUM][MAXNUMsSIZE];

int main()
{
    int Nums[]={3,4,5,6,7,9,13,11,12,13,22,35,17,14,18,23,33,54};
    int sum=SUM;
    int size=sizeof(Nums)/sizeof(int);
    int i,j,a[]={0};
    long long N=0;
    //CTime timer1;

    for(i=0;i<SUM;++i) 
        for(j=0;j<MAXNUMsSIZE;++j) 
            table1[i][j]=-1;

    N = CountAddToSum(sum,Nums,size,a,0); //algorithm
    //timer1.Get_Passd();

    //printf("\nN=%lld time=%.1f ms\n", N,timer1.Get_Passd());
    printf("\nN=%lld \n", N);
    getchar();
    return 1;
}

long long CountAddToSum(int s, int arr[],int arrsize, const int r[],int rsize)
{
    static int totalmem=0, maxmem=0;
    int i,*rnew;
    long long result1=0,result2=0;

    if(s<0) return 0;
    if (table1[s][arrsize]>0 && PRINT==0) return table1[s][arrsize];
    if(s==0)
    {
        if(PRINT) printr(r, rsize);
        return 1;
    }
    if(arrsize==0) return 0;

    //else
    rnew=(int*)malloc((rsize+1)*sizeof(int));

    for(i=0;i<rsize;++i) rnew[i]=r[i]; 
    rnew[rsize]=arr[arrsize-1];

    result1 =  CountAddToSum(s,arr,arrsize-1,rnew,rsize);
    result2 =  CountAddToSum(s-arr[arrsize-1],arr,arrsize,rnew,rsize+1);
    table1[s][arrsize]=result1+result2;
    free(rnew);

    return result1+result2;

}

void printr(const int r[], int rsize)
{
    int lastr=r[0],count=0,i;
    for(i=0; i<rsize;++i) 
    {
        if(r[i]==lastr)
            count++;
        else
        {
            printf(" %d*%d ",count,lastr);
            lastr=r[i];
            count=1;
        }
    }
    if(r[i-1]==lastr) printf(" %d*%d ",count,lastr);

    printf("\n");

}
1
  • hi there! I need a code to do something like that, find all possible sums of sets of 6 numbers in a list of 60 numbers. The sums should be in range of min 180, max 191. Could that code be adjusted for that? Where to run that code on cloud? I tried with no success at Codenvy – user1667306 Sep 20 '16 at 19:38
2

Excel VBA version below. I needed to implement this in VBA (not my preference, don't judge me!), and used the answers on this page for the approach. I'm uploading in case others also need a VBA version.

Option Explicit

Public Sub SumTarget()
    Dim numbers(0 To 6)  As Long
    Dim target As Long

    target = 15
    numbers(0) = 3: numbers(1) = 9: numbers(2) = 8: numbers(3) = 4: numbers(4) = 5
    numbers(5) = 7: numbers(6) = 10

    Call SumUpTarget(numbers, target)
End Sub

Public Sub SumUpTarget(numbers() As Long, target As Long)
    Dim part() As Long
    Call SumUpRecursive(numbers, target, part)
End Sub

Private Sub SumUpRecursive(numbers() As Long, target As Long, part() As Long)

    Dim s As Long, i As Long, j As Long, num As Long
    Dim remaining() As Long, partRec() As Long
    s = SumArray(part)

    If s = target Then Debug.Print "SUM ( " & ArrayToString(part) & " ) = " & target
    If s >= target Then Exit Sub

    If (Not Not numbers) <> 0 Then
        For i = 0 To UBound(numbers)
            Erase remaining()
            num = numbers(i)
            For j = i + 1 To UBound(numbers)
                AddToArray remaining, numbers(j)
            Next j
            Erase partRec()
            CopyArray partRec, part
            AddToArray partRec, num
            SumUpRecursive remaining, target, partRec
        Next i
    End If

End Sub

Private Function ArrayToString(x() As Long) As String
    Dim n As Long, result As String
    result = "{" & x(n)
    For n = LBound(x) + 1 To UBound(x)
        result = result & "," & x(n)
    Next n
    result = result & "}"
    ArrayToString = result
End Function

Private Function SumArray(x() As Long) As Long
    Dim n As Long
    SumArray = 0
    If (Not Not x) <> 0 Then
        For n = LBound(x) To UBound(x)
            SumArray = SumArray + x(n)
        Next n
    End If
End Function

Private Sub AddToArray(arr() As Long, x As Long)
    If (Not Not arr) <> 0 Then
        ReDim Preserve arr(0 To UBound(arr) + 1)
    Else
        ReDim Preserve arr(0 To 0)
    End If
    arr(UBound(arr)) = x
End Sub

Private Sub CopyArray(destination() As Long, source() As Long)
    Dim n As Long
    If (Not Not source) <> 0 Then
        For n = 0 To UBound(source)
                AddToArray destination, source(n)
        Next n
    End If
End Sub

Output (written to the Immediate window) should be:

SUM ( {3,8,4} ) = 15
SUM ( {3,5,7} ) = 15
SUM ( {8,7} ) = 15
SUM ( {5,10} ) = 15 
2

Here is a better version with better output formatting and C++ 11 features:

void subset_sum_rec(std::vector<int> & nums, const int & target, std::vector<int> & partialNums) 
{
    int currentSum = std::accumulate(partialNums.begin(), partialNums.end(), 0);
    if (currentSum > target)
        return;
    if (currentSum == target) 
    {
        std::cout << "sum([";
        for (auto it = partialNums.begin(); it != std::prev(partialNums.end()); ++it)
            cout << *it << ",";
        cout << *std::prev(partialNums.end());
        std::cout << "])=" << target << std::endl;
    }
    for (auto it = nums.begin(); it != nums.end(); ++it) 
    {
        std::vector<int> remaining;
        for (auto it2 = std::next(it); it2 != nums.end(); ++it2)
            remaining.push_back(*it2);

        std::vector<int> partial = partialNums;
        partial.push_back(*it);
        subset_sum_rec(remaining, target, partial);
    }
}
2

Deduce 0 in the first place. Zero is an identiy for addition so it is useless by the monoid laws in this particular case. Also deduce negative numbers as well if you want to climb up to a positive number. Otherwise you would also need subtraction operation.

So... the fastest algorithm you can get on this particular job is as follows given in JS.

function items2T([n,...ns],t){
    var c = ~~(t/n);
    return ns.length ? Array(c+1).fill()
                                 .reduce((r,_,i) => r.concat(items2T(ns, t-n*i).map(s => Array(i).fill(n).concat(s))),[])
                     : t % n ? []
                             : [Array(c).fill(n)];
};

var data = [3, 9, 8, 4, 5, 7, 10],
    result;

console.time("combos");
result = items2T(data, 15);
console.timeEnd("combos");
console.log(JSON.stringify(result));

This is a very fast algorithm but if you sort the data array descending it will be even faster. Using .sort() is insignificant since the algorithm will end up with much less recursive invocations.

1
  • Nice. It shows that you're an experienced programmer :) – James P. Apr 23 '19 at 0:52
2

There are a lot of solutions so far, but all are of the form generate then filter. Which means that they potentially spend a lot of time working on recursive paths that do not lead to a solution.

Here is a solution that is O(size_of_array * (number_of_sums + number_of_solutions)). In other words it uses dynamic programming to avoid enumerating possible solutions that will never match.

For giggles and grins I made this work with numbers that are both positive and negative, and made it an iterator. It will work for Python 2.3+.

def subset_sum_iter(array, target):
    sign = 1
    array = sorted(array)
    if target < 0:
        array = reversed(array)
        sign = -1

    last_index = {0: [-1]}
    for i in range(len(array)):
        for s in list(last_index.keys()):
            new_s = s + array[i]
            if 0 < (new_s - target) * sign:
                pass # Cannot lead to target
            elif new_s in last_index:
                last_index[new_s].append(i)
            else:
                last_index[new_s] = [i]

    # Now yield up the answers.
    def recur (new_target, max_i):
        for i in last_index[new_target]:
            if i == -1:
                yield [] # Empty sum.
            elif max_i <= i:
                break # Not our solution.
            else:
                for answer in recur(new_target - array[i], i):
                    answer.append(array[i])
                    yield answer

    for answer in recur(target, len(array)):
        yield answer

And here is an example of it being used with an array and target where the filtering approach used in other solutions would effectively never finish.

def is_prime (n):
    for i in range(2, n):
        if 0 == n%i:
            return False
        elif n < i*i:
            return True
    if n == 2:
        return True
    else:
        return False

def primes (limit):
    n = 2
    while True:
        if is_prime(n):
            yield(n)
        n = n+1
        if limit < n:
            break

for answer in subset_sum_iter(primes(1000), 76000):
    print(answer)

This prints all 522 answers in under 2 seconds. The previous approaches would be lucky to find any answers in the current lifetime of the universe. (The full space has 2^168 = 3.74144419156711e+50 possible combinations to run through. That...takes a while.)

1

To find the combinations using excel - (its fairly easy). (You computer must not be too slow)

  1. Go to this site
  2. Go to the "Sum to Target" page
  3. Download the "Sum to Target" excel file.

    Follow the directions on the website page.

hope this helps.

1

Swift 3 conversion of Java solution: (by @JeremyThompson)

protocol _IntType { }
extension Int: _IntType {}


extension Array where Element: _IntType {

    func subsets(to: Int) -> [[Element]]? {

        func sum_up_recursive(_ numbers: [Element], _ target: Int, _ partial: [Element], _ solution: inout [[Element]]) {

            var sum: Int = 0
            for x in partial {
                sum += x as! Int
            }

            if sum == target {
                solution.append(partial)
            }

            guard sum < target else {
                return
            }

            for i in stride(from: 0, to: numbers.count, by: 1) {

                var remaining = [Element]()

                for j in stride(from: i + 1, to: numbers.count, by: 1) {
                    remaining.append(numbers[j])
                }

                var partial_rec = [Element](partial)
                partial_rec.append(numbers[i])

                sum_up_recursive(remaining, target, partial_rec, &solution)
            }
        }

        var solutions = [[Element]]()
        sum_up_recursive(self, to, [Element](), &solutions)

        return solutions.count > 0 ? solutions : nil
    }

}

usage:

let numbers = [3, 9, 8, 4, 5, 7, 10]

if let solution = numbers.subsets(to: 15) {
    print(solution) // output: [[3, 8, 4], [3, 5, 7], [8, 7], [5, 10]]
} else {
    print("not possible")
}
1

This can be used to print all the answers as well

public void recur(int[] a, int n, int sum, int[] ans, int ind) {
    if (n < 0 && sum != 0)
        return;
    if (n < 0 && sum == 0) {
        print(ans, ind);
        return;
    }
    if (sum >= a[n]) {
        ans[ind] = a[n];
        recur(a, n - 1, sum - a[n], ans, ind + 1);
    }
    recur(a, n - 1, sum, ans, ind);
}

public void print(int[] a, int n) {
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        System.out.print(a[i] + " ");
    System.out.println();
}

Time Complexity is exponential. Order of 2^n

1

I was doing something similar for a scala assignment. Thought of posting my solution here:

 def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = {
      def getCount(money: Int, remainingCoins: List[Int]): Int = {
        if(money == 0 ) 1
        else if(money < 0 || remainingCoins.isEmpty) 0
        else
          getCount(money, remainingCoins.tail) +
            getCount(money - remainingCoins.head, remainingCoins)
      }
      if(money == 0 || coins.isEmpty) 0
      else getCount(money, coins)
    }
1

I ported the C# sample to Objective-c and didn't see it in the responses:

//Usage
NSMutableArray* numberList = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
NSMutableArray* partial = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
int target = 16;
for( int i = 1; i<target; i++ )
{ [numberList addObject:@(i)]; }
[self findSums:numberList target:target part:partial];


//*******************************************************************
// Finds combinations of numbers that add up to target recursively
//*******************************************************************
-(void)findSums:(NSMutableArray*)numbers target:(int)target part:(NSMutableArray*)partial
{
    int s = 0;
    for (NSNumber* x in partial)
    { s += [x intValue]; }

    if (s == target)
    { NSLog(@"Sum[%@]", partial); }

    if (s >= target)
    { return; }

    for (int i = 0;i < [numbers count];i++ )
    {
        int n = [numbers[i] intValue];
        NSMutableArray* remaining = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
        for (int j = i + 1; j < [numbers count];j++)
        { [remaining addObject:@([numbers[j] intValue])]; }

        NSMutableArray* partRec = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithArray:partial];
        [partRec addObject:@(n)];
        [self findSums:remaining target:target part:partRec];
    }
}
0
1

@KeithBeller's answer with slightly changed variable names and some comments.

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<int> input = new List<int>() { 3, 9, 8, 4, 5, 7, 10 };
        int targetSum = 15;
        SumUp(input, targetSum);
    }

    public static void SumUp(List<int> input, int targetSum)
    {
        SumUpRecursive(input, targetSum, new List<int>());
    }

    private static void SumUpRecursive(List<int> remaining, int targetSum, List<int> listToSum)
    {
        // Sum up partial
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (int x in listToSum)
            sum += x;

        //Check sum matched
        if (sum == targetSum)
            Console.WriteLine("sum(" + string.Join(",", listToSum.ToArray()) + ")=" + targetSum);

        //Check sum passed
        if (sum >= targetSum)
            return;

        //Iterate each input character
        for (int i = 0; i < remaining.Count; i++)
        {
            //Build list of remaining items to iterate
            List<int> newRemaining = new List<int>();
            for (int j = i + 1; j < remaining.Count; j++)
                newRemaining.Add(remaining[j]);

            //Update partial list
            List<int> newListToSum = new List<int>(listToSum);
            int currentItem = remaining[i];
            newListToSum.Add(currentItem);
            SumUpRecursive(newRemaining, targetSum, newListToSum);
        }
    }'
1

PHP Version, as inspired by Keith Beller's C# version.

bala's PHP version did not work for me, because I did not need to group numbers. I wanted a simpler implementation with one target value, and a pool of numbers. This function will also prune any duplicate entries.

/**
 * Calculates a subset sum: finds out which combinations of numbers
 * from the numbers array can be added together to come to the target
 * number.
 * 
 * Returns an indexed array with arrays of number combinations.
 * 
 * Example: 
 * 
 * <pre>
 * $matches = subset_sum(array(5,10,7,3,20), 25);
 * </pre>
 * 
 * Returns:
 * 
 * <pre>
 * Array
 * (
 *   [0] => Array
 *   (
 *       [0] => 3
 *       [1] => 5
 *       [2] => 7
 *       [3] => 10
 *   )
 *   [1] => Array
 *   (
 *       [0] => 5
 *       [1] => 20
 *   )
 * )
 * </pre>
 * 
 * @param number[] $numbers
 * @param number $target
 * @param array $part
 * @return array[number[]]
 */
function subset_sum($numbers, $target, $part=null)
{
    // we assume that an empty $part variable means this
    // is the top level call.
    $toplevel = false;
    if($part === null) {
        $toplevel = true;
        $part = array();
    }

    $s = 0;
    foreach($part as $x) 
    {
        $s = $s + $x;
    }

    // we have found a match!
    if($s == $target) 
    {
        sort($part); // ensure the numbers are always sorted
        return array(implode('|', $part));
    }

    // gone too far, break off
    if($s >= $target) 
    {
        return null;
    }

    $matches = array();
    $totalNumbers = count($numbers);

    for($i=0; $i < $totalNumbers; $i++) 
    {
        $remaining = array();
        $n = $numbers[$i];

        for($j = $i+1; $j < $totalNumbers; $j++) 
        {
            $remaining[] = $numbers[$j];
        }

        $part_rec = $part;
        $part_rec[] = $n;

        $result = subset_sum($remaining, $target, $part_rec);
        if($result) 
        {
            $matches = array_merge($matches, $result);
        }
    }

    if(!$toplevel) 
    {
        return $matches;
    }

    // this is the top level function call: we have to
    // prepare the final result value by stripping any
    // duplicate results.
    $matches = array_unique($matches);
    $result = array();
    foreach($matches as $entry) 
    {
        $result[] = explode('|', $entry);
    }

    return $result;
}
1

Recommended as an answer:

Here's a solution using es2015 generators:

function* subsetSum(numbers, target, partial = [], partialSum = 0) {

  if(partialSum === target) yield partial

  if(partialSum >= target) return

  for(let i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++){
    const remaining = numbers.slice(i + 1)
        , n = numbers[i]

    yield* subsetSum(remaining, target, [...partial, n], partialSum + n)
  }

}

Using generators can actually be very useful because it allows you to pause script execution immediately upon finding a valid subset. This is in contrast to solutions without generators (ie lacking state) which have to iterate through every single subset of numbers

1

I did not like the Javascript Solution I saw above. Here is the one I build using partial applying, closures and recursion:

Ok, I was mainly concern about, if the combinations array could satisfy the target requirement, hopefully this approached you will start to find the rest of combinations

Here just set the target and pass the combinations array.

function main() {
    const target = 10
    const getPermutationThatSumT = setTarget(target)
    const permutation = getPermutationThatSumT([1, 4, 2, 5, 6, 7])

    console.log( permutation );
}

the currently implementation I came up with

function setTarget(target) {
    let partial = [];

    return function permute(input) {
        let i, removed;
        for (i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
            removed = input.splice(i, 1)[0];
            partial.push(removed);

            const sum = partial.reduce((a, b) => a + b)
            if (sum === target) return partial.slice()
            if (sum < target) permute(input)

            input.splice(i, 0, removed);
            partial.pop();
        }
        return null
    };
}
0
function solve(n){
    let DP = [];

     DP[0] = DP[1] = DP[2] = 1;
     DP[3] = 2;

    for (let i = 4; i <= n; i++) {
      DP[i] = DP[i-1] + DP[i-3] + DP[i-4];
    }
    return DP[n]
}

console.log(solve(5))

This is a Dynamic Solution for JS to tell how many ways anyone can get the certain sum. This can be the right solution if you think about time and space complexity.

0
import java.util.*;

public class Main{

     int recursionDepth = 0;
     private int[][] memo;

     public static void main(String []args){
         int[] nums = new int[] {5,2,4,3,1};
         int N = nums.length;
         Main main =  new Main();
         main.memo = new int[N+1][N+1];
         main._findCombo(0, N-1,nums, 8, 0, new LinkedList() );
         System.out.println(main.recursionDepth);
     }


       private void _findCombo(
           int from,
           int to,
           int[] nums,
           int targetSum,
           int currentSum,
           LinkedList<Integer> list){

            if(memo[from][to] != 0) {
                currentSum = currentSum + memo[from][to];
            }

            if(currentSum > targetSum) {
                return;
            }

            if(currentSum ==  targetSum) {
                System.out.println("Found - " +list);
                return;
            }

            recursionDepth++;

           for(int i= from ; i <= to; i++){
               list.add(nums[i]);
               memo[from][i] = currentSum + nums[i];
               _findCombo(i+1, to,nums, targetSum, memo[from][i], list);
                list.removeLast();
           }

     }
}

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