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If I have a list of lists and want to find all the possible combination from each different indices, how could I do that?

For example:

list_of_lists = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]

I want to find

all_possibility = [[1, 5, 9], [1, 8, 6], [4, 2, 9], [4, 8, 3], [7, 2, 6], [7, 5, 3]]

where

  • [1,5,9]: 1 is 1st element of [1, 2, 3], 5 is 2nd element of [4, 5, 6], 9 is 3rd element of [7, 8, 9].

  • [1,8,6]: 1 is 1st element of [1, 2, 3], 8 is 2nd element of [7, 8, 9], 6 is 3rd element of [4, 5, 6].

and so on.

(Edited) Note: I would like the result to be in the same order as the original element of the list. [1, 8, 6] but not [1, 6, 8] because 8 is the 2nd element of [7, 8, 9].

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  • 1
    Hi @Raj Thanks for the prompt response. I have tried list(itertools.product(* list_of_lists)), but it gives me ALL the possible cases without considering the indices. I am thinking to try multiple for loops, but I don't think it is a good idea (or is it?). There must be a better way in python. I have scratched my head for all day. Any keyword/post I should look up? Thanks.
    – udothemath
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 21:21
  • @udothemath1984, is it case for only 3 input sublists? Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 21:23
  • Hi @RomanPerekhrest Not necessary. It might be list_of_lists = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6], [7, 8]]. In this case, all_possibility would be [[1, 4], [1, 6], [1, 8], [3, 2], [3, 6], [3, 8], [5, 2], [5, 4], [5, 8], [7, 2], [7, 4], [7, 6]]. If I know how to solve the case with 3 subllists, I should be able to figure this out (I assume). Thanks.
    – udothemath
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 21:30
  • @udothemath1984, so aren't you looking for something like Mr Geek answered?
    – Raj
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 21:33
  • Nope. I need the ones with different indices from other list in the nested list.
    – udothemath
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 21:40

3 Answers 3

6

What you're looking for is the Cartesian product, in Python itertools.product:

>>> import itertools
>>> list_of_lists = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> all_possibility = list(itertools.product(*list_of_lists))
>>> print(all_possibility)
[(1, 4, 7), (1, 4, 8), (1, 4, 9), (1, 5, 7), (1, 5, 8), (1, 5, 9), (1, 6, 7), (1, 6, 8),
 (1, 6, 9), (2, 4, 7), (2, 4, 8), (2, 4, 9), (2, 5, 7), (2, 5, 8), (2, 5, 9), (2, 6, 7),
 (2, 6, 8), (2, 6, 9), (3, 4, 7), (3, 4, 8), (3, 4, 9), (3, 5, 7), (3, 5, 8), (3, 5, 9),
 (3, 6, 7), (3, 6, 8), (3, 6, 9)]

If you want permutations based on the indices rather than the values, you can use itertools.combinations to get the possible indices, then use those indices to get the respective values from the sub-lists, like this:

>>> list_of_lists = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> length = 3
>>> all_indices = list(itertools.permutations(range(length), length))
>>> all_possibility = [[l[i] for l,i in zip(list_of_lists, indices)] for indices in all_indices]
>>> print(all_possibility)
[[1, 5, 9], [1, 6, 8], [2, 4, 9], [2, 6, 7], [3, 4, 8], [3, 5, 7]]
3
  • Not entirely. I have to consider the indices as well. For example, (1, 4, 7) is excluded because 1, and 4 both are the 1st element from the list of the lists (from [1, 2, 3] and [4, 5, 6]). And actually (1, 4, 7) all of them are from the first component of the nested list. I need the cases with all the different indices. Thanks.
    – udothemath
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 21:35
  • @udothemath1984 I updated my answer with a solution to your specific problem.
    – Djaouad
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 22:10
  • Thanks @Mr Geek I learn a lot from the thread. I need the results to be in the same order of where it comes from. For instance, [1, 8, 6] but not [1, 6, 8] since 8 is the second element from the list [7, 8, 9].
    – udothemath
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 22:43
2

I have to consider the indices as well. For example, (1, 4, 7) is excluded because 1, and 4 both are the 1st element from the list of the lists (from [1, 2, 3] and [4, 5, 6]). And actually (1, 4, 7) all of them are from the first component of the nested list. I need the cases with all the different indices.

So you actually just want to get the possible permutations of a “list selector” for each index in the output, i.e. these are what you are trying to get:

>>> list(itertools.permutations(range(3), 3))
[(0, 1, 2), (0, 2, 1), (1, 0, 2), (1, 2, 0), (2, 0, 1), (2, 1, 0)]

And once you have that, you just need to translate into your list_of_lists where you access each index from the specified sublist:

>>> [[list_of_lists[k][i] for i, k in enumerate(comb)] for comb in itertools.permutations(range(3), 3)]
[[1, 5, 9], [1, 8, 6], [4, 2, 9], [4, 8, 3], [7, 2, 6], [7, 5, 3]]
1
  • Wow! Thanks @poke. It is very readable and the results remain the order of all the possible cases. It is exactly what I am looking for.
    – udothemath
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 22:38
0

In a spirit of @poke's approach, here is the cases for number of elements differ than the number of the list in the lists. (Previously, there are 3 elements in individual list where 3 sub-lists in the list).

list_of_lists = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6], [7, 8]]

We expect every (0, 1) pairs from the list of lists, or

all_possibility = [[1, 4], [1, 6], [1, 8], [3, 2], [3, 6], [3, 8], \
                   [5, 2], [5, 4], [5, 8], [7, 2], [7, 4], [7, 6]]

The code:

permutation_cases = list(itertools.permutations(range(2), 2))
select_from = list(itertools.combinations(range(len(list_of_lists)), 2))

all_possibility = []
for selecting_index in select_from:
        selected = [list_of_lists[i] for i in selecting_index ]
        cases = list([selected[k][i] for i, k in enumerate(comb)] for comb in permutation_cases)
        for item in cases:
            all_possibility.append(item)
print(all_possibility)

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