I am having a dynamic MySQL code that does have an ORDER BY clause. The table contains multiple columns but the ones that are important are stat and quality.

The stat column is mathematical calculation in select statement with type of INT type while the quality column is of STRING type.

Now I do have a statement of such:

SELECT (col1+col2+col3) as cast(STAT as unsigned), QUALITY FROM GEAR
ORDER BY CASE WHEN 1=1 THEN stat
              WHEN 1=0 THEN quality END  DESC

Now I do expect the code in above scenario to sort the results by the stat column in integer way:

stat    quality
1       normal
2       normal
3       better
4       better

However the actual way the results are displayed is as if the integer was autocasted to string:

stat    quality
1       normal
11      normal
12      better
2       better

Now if I:

  1. Remove the second case 1=0 statement (which is never true)
  2. Cast the "quality" column to int (from string)
  3. Change the "quality" value inside WHEN 1=0 THEN QUALITY END DESC to any other numeric column

The statement will work correctly and sort the output by STAT in the integer way.

I am trying to understand why is MySQL (MariaDB) deciding to sort the stat integer type column in a string way if the CASE/IF statement inside ORDER BY contains string type column in the other WHEN and find a way for this to not happen.

Maria

  • MariaDB decides how to execute a query by analyzing its structure. It especially does not first retrieve the rows, sees that they are all integers and then dynamically decides how to order. The query states: in some case there can be a string. So MariaDB decides (in planning phase) to cast it. Yes, it could optimize that case away - but on the other hand, so could you. The optimizer is not there to find all trick questions. You could add a feature request (MariaDB can actually find e.g. stuff like 1=0 in a where clause), although I doubt the developers will regard it a very important one. – Solarflare Sep 21 '17 at 14:56
  • Hi Solarflare, so there is no way for my query to order it in the right way depending on what type of variable is returned by the CASE statement? :( – Maria Nowinska Sep 21 '17 at 15:00
  • Well, you listed some options that would work for your specific query. If you tell MariaDB it is an int, it will sort it as an int. You would need to add a specific real-life-problem to get a possible solution to that specific real-life-problem. (I assume you want to do something like dynamic ordering in a procedure depending on a variable (so e.g. ...when @order_by_setting = 1 then...)?) – Solarflare Sep 21 '17 at 15:07
  • One option is to use PREPARE Statement, see dbfiddle. – wchiquito Sep 22 '17 at 10:19
  • @Solarflare how can I tell MariaDB it is an int? I am casting it in the select statement, I've also tried casting it inside ORDER BY and it doesn't work! Also yes the case statement simply checks if a parameter contains a value or not before sorting it by mathematical int column or type string column... – Maria Nowinska Sep 22 '17 at 10:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Punt. Don't do it that way.

I assume 1=1 and 1=0 comes from code that is trying to control which column to order by? Make your code a tiny bit smarter -- so that it generates either

ORDER BY stat

or

ORDER BY quality

Or, if you need a combo, then be smart enough to generate one of these:

ORDER BY stat, quality
ORDER BY quality, stat
  • This is gold idea Rick James. Thanks! So I assume its just how the MySQL/MariaDB works and the behaviour I have discovered is completely normal? – Maria Nowinska Sep 22 '17 at 11:03
  • @MariaNowinska - It is a general compiler issue -- an expression (in your example, CASE...) needs to have a single, predetermined, datatype. – Rick James Sep 22 '17 at 13:21

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