116

While using Swift4 and Codable protocols I got the following problem - it looks like there is no way to allow JSONDecoder to skip elements in an array. For example, I have the following JSON:

[
    {
        "name": "Banana",
        "points": 200,
        "description": "A banana grown in Ecuador."
    },
    {
        "name": "Orange"
    }
]

And a Codable struct:

struct GroceryProduct: Codable {
    var name: String
    var points: Int
    var description: String?
}

When decoding this json

let decoder = JSONDecoder()
let products = try decoder.decode([GroceryProduct].self, from: json)

Resulting products is empty. Which is to be expected, due to the fact that the second object in JSON has no "points" key, while points is not optional in GroceryProduct struct.

Question is how can I allow JSONDecoder to "skip" invalid object?

  • We can't skip the invalid objects but you can assign default values if it is nil. – Vini App Sep 21 '17 at 18:44
  • 1
    Why can't points just be declared optional? – NRitH Oct 21 '18 at 4:26

13 Answers 13

115

One option is to use a wrapper type that attempts to decode a given value; storing nil if unsuccessful:

struct FailableDecodable<Base : Decodable> : Decodable {

    let base: Base?

    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        let container = try decoder.singleValueContainer()
        self.base = try? container.decode(Base.self)
    }
}

We can then decode an array of these, with your GroceryProduct filling in the Base placeholder:

import Foundation

let json = """
[
    {
        "name": "Banana",
        "points": 200,
        "description": "A banana grown in Ecuador."
    },
    {
        "name": "Orange"
    }
]
""".data(using: .utf8)!


struct GroceryProduct : Codable {
    var name: String
    var points: Int
    var description: String?
}

let products = try JSONDecoder()
    .decode([FailableDecodable<GroceryProduct>].self, from: json)
    .compactMap { $0.base } // .flatMap in Swift 4.0

print(products)

// [
//    GroceryProduct(
//      name: "Banana", points: 200,
//      description: Optional("A banana grown in Ecuador.")
//    )
// ]

We're then using .compactMap { $0.base } to filter out nil elements (those that threw an error on decoding).

This will create an intermediate array of [FailableDecodable<GroceryProduct>], which shouldn't be an issue; however if you wish to avoid it, you could always create another wrapper type that decodes and unwraps each element from an unkeyed container:

struct FailableCodableArray<Element : Codable> : Codable {

    var elements: [Element]

    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {

        var container = try decoder.unkeyedContainer()

        var elements = [Element]()
        if let count = container.count {
            elements.reserveCapacity(count)
        }

        while !container.isAtEnd {
            if let element = try container
                .decode(FailableDecodable<Element>.self).base {

                elements.append(element)
            }
        }

        self.elements = elements
    }

    func encode(to encoder: Encoder) throws {
        var container = encoder.singleValueContainer()
        try container.encode(elements)
    }
}

You would then decode as:

let products = try JSONDecoder()
    .decode(FailableCodableArray<GroceryProduct>.self, from: json)
    .elements

print(products)

// [
//    GroceryProduct(
//      name: "Banana", points: 200,
//      description: Optional("A banana grown in Ecuador.")
//    )
// ]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    What if the base object isn't an array, but it contains one? Like { "products": [{"name": "banana"...},...] } – ludvigeriksson Jan 25 '18 at 14:29
  • 2
    @ludvigeriksson You just want to perform the decoding within that structure then, for example: gist.github.com/hamishknight/c6d270f7298e4db9e787aecb5b98bcae – Hamish Jan 25 '18 at 17:19
  • 1
    Swift's Codable was easy, until now.. can't this be made tad simpler? – Jonny Jun 7 '18 at 12:19
  • @Hamish I don't see any error handling for this line. What happens if an error is thrown here var container = try decoder.unkeyedContainer() – bibscy Jun 12 '18 at 6:11
  • @bibscy It's within the body of init(from:) throws, so Swift will automatically propagate the error back to the caller (in this case the decoder, which will propagate it back to the JSONDecoder.decode(_:from:) call). – Hamish Jun 12 '18 at 9:53
33

I would create a new type Throwable, which can wrap any type conforming to Decodable:

enum Throwable<T: Decodable>: Decodable {
    case success(T)
    case failure(Error)

    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        do {
            let decoded = try T(from: decoder)
            self = .success(decoded)
        } catch let error {
            self = .failure(error)
        }
    }
}

For decoding an array of GroceryProduct (or any other Collection):

let decoder = JSONDecoder()
let throwables = try decoder.decode([Throwable<GroceryProduct>].self, from: json)
let products = throwables.compactMap { $0.value }

where value is a computed property introduced in an extension on Throwable:

extension Throwable {
    var value: T? {
        switch self {
        case .failure(_):
            return nil
        case .success(let value):
            return value
        }
    }
}

I would opt for using a enum wrapper type (over a Struct) because it may be useful to keep track of the errors that are thrown as well as their indices.

Swift 5

For Swift 5 Consider using the Result enum e.g.

struct Throwable<T: Decodable>: Decodable {
    let result: Result<T, Error>

    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        result = Result(catching: { try T(from: decoder) })
    }
}

To unwrap the decoded value use the get() method on the result property:

let products = throwables.compactMap { try? $0.result.get() }
| improve this answer | |
  • I like this answer because I don't have to worry about writing any custom init – Mihai Fratu Sep 10 '18 at 10:31
  • This is the solution I was looking for. It's so clean and straightforward. Thank you for this! – naturaln0va Jan 16 at 16:19
24

The problem is that when iterating over a container, the container.currentIndex isn’t incremented so you can try to decode again with a different type.

Because the currentIndex is read only, a solution is to increment it yourself successfully decoding a dummy. I took @Hamish solution, and wrote a wrapper with a custom init.

This problem is a current Swift bug: https://bugs.swift.org/browse/SR-5953

The solution posted here is a workaround in one of the comments. I like this option because I’m parsing a bunch of models the same way on a network client, and I wanted the solution to be local to one of the objects. That is, I still want the others to be discarded.

I explain better in my github https://github.com/phynet/Lossy-array-decode-swift4

import Foundation

    let json = """
    [
        {
            "name": "Banana",
            "points": 200,
            "description": "A banana grown in Ecuador."
        },
        {
            "name": "Orange"
        }
    ]
    """.data(using: .utf8)!

    private struct DummyCodable: Codable {}

    struct Groceries: Codable 
    {
        var groceries: [GroceryProduct]

        init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
            var groceries = [GroceryProduct]()
            var container = try decoder.unkeyedContainer()
            while !container.isAtEnd {
                if let route = try? container.decode(GroceryProduct.self) {
                    groceries.append(route)
                } else {
                    _ = try? container.decode(DummyCodable.self) // <-- TRICK
                }
            }
            self.groceries = groceries
        }
    }

    struct GroceryProduct: Codable {
        var name: String
        var points: Int
        var description: String?
    }

    let products = try JSONDecoder().decode(Groceries.self, from: json)

    print(products)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    One variation, instead of an if/else I use a do/catch inside the while loop so I can log the error – Fraser Dec 4 '17 at 23:00
  • 2
    This answer mentions the Swift bug tracker and has the simplest additional struct (no generics!) so I think it should be the accepted one. – Alper Sep 6 '18 at 7:26
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer. Any answer that corrupts your data model is an unacceptable tradeoff imo. – Joe Susnick Mar 14 '19 at 17:48
21

There are two options:

  1. Declare all members of the struct as optional whose keys can be missing

    struct GroceryProduct: Codable {
        var name: String
        var points : Int?
        var description: String?
    }
    
  2. Write a custom initializer to assign default values in the nil case.

    struct GroceryProduct: Codable {
        var name: String
        var points : Int
        var description: String
    
        init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
            let values = try decoder.container(keyedBy: CodingKeys.self)
            name = try values.decode(String.self, forKey: .name)
            points = try values.decodeIfPresent(Int.self, forKey: .points) ?? 0
            description = try values.decodeIfPresent(String.self, forKey: .description) ?? ""
        }
    }
    
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Instead of try? with decode it's better to use try with decodeIfPresent in second option. We need to set default value only if there is no key, not in case of any decoding failure, like when key exists, but type is wrong. – user28434 Sep 22 '17 at 15:55
  • hey @vadian do you know any other SO questions involving custom initializer to assign default values in case type doesn't match? I have a key that is an Int but sometimes will be a String in the JSON so I tried doing what you said above with deviceName = try values.decodeIfPresent(Int.self, forKey: .deviceName) ?? 00000 so if it fails it will just put 0000 in but it still fails. – Martheli Dec 30 '17 at 6:24
  • In this case decodeIfPresent is the wrong API because the key does exist. Use another do - catch block. Decode String, if an error occurs, decode Int – vadian Dec 30 '17 at 7:41
13

A solution made possible by Swift 5.1, using the property wrapper:

@propertyWrapper
struct IgnoreFailure<Value: Decodable>: Decodable {
    var wrappedValue: [Value] = []

    private struct _None: Decodable {}

    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        var container = try decoder.unkeyedContainer()
        while !container.isAtEnd {
            if let decoded = try? container.decode(Value.self) {
                wrappedValue.append(decoded)
            }
            else {
                // item is silently ignored.
                try? container.decode(_None.self)
            }
        }
    }
}

And then the usage:

let json = """
{
    "products": [
        {
            "name": "Banana",
            "points": 200,
            "description": "A banana grown in Ecuador."
        },
        {
            "name": "Orange"
        }
    ]
}
""".data(using: .utf8)!

struct GroceryProduct: Decodable {
    var name: String
    var points: Int
    var description: String?
}

struct ProductResponse: Decodable {
    @IgnoreFailure
    var products: [GroceryProduct]
}


let response = try! JSONDecoder().decode(ProductResponse.self, from: json)
print(response.products) // Only contains banana.

Note: The property wrapper things will only works if the response can be wrapped in a struct (i.e: not a top level array). In that case, you can still wrap it manually (with a typealias for better readability):

typealias ArrayIgnoringFailure<Value: Decodable> = IgnoreFailure<Value>

let response = try! JSONDecoder().decode(ArrayIgnoringFailure<GroceryProduct>.self, from: json)
print(response.wrappedValue) // Only contains banana.

| improve this answer | |
7

Ive put @sophy-swicz solution, with some modifications, into an easy to use extension

fileprivate struct DummyCodable: Codable {}

extension UnkeyedDecodingContainer {

    public mutating func decodeArray<T>(_ type: T.Type) throws -> [T] where T : Decodable {

        var array = [T]()
        while !self.isAtEnd {
            do {
                let item = try self.decode(T.self)
                array.append(item)
            } catch let error {
                print("error: \(error)")

                // hack to increment currentIndex
                _ = try self.decode(DummyCodable.self)
            }
        }
        return array
    }
}
extension KeyedDecodingContainerProtocol {
    public func decodeArray<T>(_ type: T.Type, forKey key: Self.Key) throws -> [T] where T : Decodable {
        var unkeyedContainer = try self.nestedUnkeyedContainer(forKey: key)
        return try unkeyedContainer.decodeArray(type)
    }
}

Just call it like this

init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {

    let container = try decoder.container(keyedBy: CodingKeys.self)

    self.items = try container.decodeArray(ItemType.self, forKey: . items)
}

For the example above:

let json = """
[
    {
        "name": "Banana",
        "points": 200,
        "description": "A banana grown in Ecuador."
    },
    {
        "name": "Orange"
    }
]
""".data(using: .utf8)!

struct Groceries: Codable 
{
    var groceries: [GroceryProduct]

    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        var container = try decoder.unkeyedContainer()
        groceries = try container.decodeArray(GroceryProduct.self)
    }
}

struct GroceryProduct: Codable {
    var name: String
    var points: Int
    var description: String?
}

let products = try JSONDecoder().decode(Groceries.self, from: json)
print(products)
| improve this answer | |
3

Unfortunately Swift 4 API doesn't have failable initializer for init(from: Decoder).

Only one solution that I see is implementing custom decoding, giving default value for optional fields and possible filter with needed data:

struct GroceryProduct: Codable {
    let name: String
    let points: Int?
    let description: String

    private enum CodingKeys: String, CodingKey {
        case name, points, description
    }

    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        let container = try decoder.container(keyedBy: CodingKeys.self)
        name = try container.decode(String.self, forKey: .name)
        points = try? container.decode(Int.self, forKey: .points)
        description = (try? container.decode(String.self, forKey: .description)) ?? "No description"
    }
}

// for test
let dict = [["name": "Banana", "points": 100], ["name": "Nut", "description": "Woof"]]
if let data = try? JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: dict, options: []) {
    let decoder = JSONDecoder()
    let result = try? decoder.decode([GroceryProduct].self, from: data)
    print("rawResult: \(result)")

    let clearedResult = result?.filter { $0.points != nil }
    print("clearedResult: \(clearedResult)")
}
| improve this answer | |
2

I had a similar issue recently, but slightly different.

struct Person: Codable {
    var name: String
    var age: Int
    var description: String?
    var friendnamesArray:[String]?
}

In this case, if one of the element in friendnamesArray is nil, the whole object is nil while decoding.

And the right way to handle this edge case is to declare the string array[String] as array of optional strings[String?] as below,

struct Person: Codable {
    var name: String
    var age: Int
    var description: String?
    var friendnamesArray:[String?]?
}
| improve this answer | |
2

I improved on @Hamish's for the case, that you want this behaviour for all arrays:

private struct OptionalContainer<Base: Codable>: Codable {
    let base: Base?
    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        let container = try decoder.singleValueContainer()
        base = try? container.decode(Base.self)
    }
}

private struct OptionalArray<Base: Codable>: Codable {
    let result: [Base]
    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        let container = try decoder.singleValueContainer()
        let tmp = try container.decode([OptionalContainer<Base>].self)
        result = tmp.compactMap { $0.base }
    }
}

extension Array where Element: Codable {
    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        let optionalArray = try OptionalArray<Element>(from: decoder)
        self = optionalArray.result
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

@Hamish's answer is great. However, you can reduce FailableCodableArray to:

struct FailableCodableArray<Element : Codable> : Codable {

    var elements: [Element]

    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        let container = try decoder.singleValueContainer()
        let elements = try container.decode([FailableDecodable<Element>].self)
        self.elements = elements.compactMap { $0.wrapped }
    }

    func encode(to encoder: Encoder) throws {
        var container = encoder.singleValueContainer()
        try container.encode(elements)
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Instead, You can also do like this:

struct GroceryProduct: Decodable {
    var name: String
    var points: Int
    var description: String?
}'

and then in while getting it:

'let groceryList = try JSONDecoder().decode(Array<GroceryProduct>.self, from: responseData)'
| improve this answer | |
0

I come up with this KeyedDecodingContainer.safelyDecodeArray that provides a simple interface:

extension KeyedDecodingContainer {

/// The sole purpose of this `EmptyDecodable` is allowing decoder to skip an element that cannot be decoded.
private struct EmptyDecodable: Decodable {}

/// Return successfully decoded elements even if some of the element fails to decode.
func safelyDecodeArray<T: Decodable>(of type: T.Type, forKey key: KeyedDecodingContainer.Key) -> [T] {
    guard var container = try? nestedUnkeyedContainer(forKey: key) else {
        return []
    }
    var elements = [T]()
    elements.reserveCapacity(container.count ?? 0)
    while !container.isAtEnd {
        /*
         Note:
         When decoding an element fails, the decoder does not move on the next element upon failure, so that we can retry the same element again
         by other means. However, this behavior potentially keeps `while !container.isAtEnd` looping forever, and Apple does not offer a `.skipFailable`
         decoder option yet. As a result, `catch` needs to manually skip the failed element by decoding it into an `EmptyDecodable` that always succeed.
         See the Swift ticket https://bugs.swift.org/browse/SR-5953.
         */
        do {
            elements.append(try container.decode(T.self))
        } catch {
            if let decodingError = error as? DecodingError {
                Logger.error("\(#function): skipping one element: \(decodingError)")
            } else {
                Logger.error("\(#function): skipping one element: \(error)")
            }
            _ = try? container.decode(EmptyDecodable.self) // skip the current element by decoding it into an empty `Decodable`
        }
    }
    return elements
}
}

The potentially infinite loop while !container.isAtEnd is a concern, and it's addressed by using EmptyDecodable.

| improve this answer | |
0

A much simpler attempt: Why don't you declare points as optional or make the array contain optional elements

let products = [GroceryProduct?]
| improve this answer | |

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