6

Let's assume I have a created a dict that is made up of n keys. Each key is mapped to a list of integers of a consistent length. What I want to make now is a new list that represents the sum of the integers at each point in lists of the dict. To illustrate:

my_dict = {'a': [1, 2, 3, 4], 'b': [2, 3, 4, 5], 'c': [3, 4, 5, 6]}

total_sum_list = []

for key in my_dict.keys():
    total_sum_list += ###some way of adding the numbers together

Expected output:

total_sum_list = [6,9,12,15]

As demonstrated above, I am not sure how to set up this for loop so that I can create a list like total_sum_list. I have tried putting together a list comprehension, but my efforts have not been successful thus far. Any suggestions?

8

What you need is to transpose the lists so you can sum the columns. So use zip on the dictionary values (keys can be ignored) and sum in list comprehension:

in one line:

total_sum_list = [sum(x) for x in zip(*my_dict.values())]

result:

[6, 9, 12, 15]

How it works:

zip interleaves the values. I'm using argument unpacking to pass the dict values are arguments to zip (like zip(a,b,c)). So when you do:

for x in zip(*my_dict.values()):
    print(x)

you get (as tuple):

(1, 3, 2)
(2, 4, 3)
(3, 5, 4)
(4, 6, 5)

data are ready to be summed (even in different order, but we don't care since addition is commutative :))

3

Depending on your use-case you might want to consider using an adequate library for more general/complex functionality.

numpy: general scientific computing

import numpy as np

my_dict = {'a': [1, 2, 3, 4], 'b': [2, 3, 4, 5], 'c': [3, 4, 5, 6]}

arr = np.array(list(d.values()))
# [[1 2 3 4]
#  [2 3 4 5]
#  [3 4 5 6]]

arr.sum(axis=0)
# [ 6  9 12 15]

pandas: data-analysis toolkit

import pandas as pd

my_dict = {'a': [1, 2, 3, 4], 'b': [2, 3, 4, 5], 'c': [3, 4, 5, 6]}

df = pd.DataFrame(my_dict)
#    a  b  c
# 0  1  2  3
# 1  2  3  4
# 2  3  4  5
# 3  4  5  6

df.sum(axis=1)
# 0     6
# 1     9
# 2    12
# 3    15
  • yes, a completely different - yet valid - approach. using those heavyweights is useful when the data is big. The performance is better than plain python in those cases (on small cases, the time spent importing the modules kills the joy :)) – Jean-François Fabre Sep 21 '17 at 19:19
  • 1
    In my opinion, using appropriate libraries for all the basic things in the first place is key for writing scalable and easily understandable code. I like your answer and the subtle combination of unpack, zip, sum and list comprehension. That is perfectly suited for python beginners to understand the language primitives and structure. I'd argue, though, that (depending on the use-case!) the library variants should be preferred. – Michael Hoff Sep 21 '17 at 23:09

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