0

I have somewhat of a special need / requirement for an observable stream that goes a bit beyond normal throttling and I am not entirely sure how to do it:

Basically I have an observable Stream originally from a normal event like so:

var someEventObservable = Observable.FromEventPattern<SomeEventHandler, SomeEventArgs>(
    handler => this.ColumnWidthChanged += handler,
    handler => this.ColumnWidthChanged -= handler)
    .Select(_ => Unit.Default);

Now as these events can happen in rapid succession and I only need to know whether it happened at least once within a given time frame, I would normally use .Throttle(), i.e. like so:

var someThrottledEventObservable = someEventObservable
    .Throttle(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(300));

But my actual requirements go one step further: if an event was raised within that throttling TimeSpan / dueTime AND if yet another event is raised after the first event but still within that dueTime, I want the throttled stream to start over from 0 wait time again and wait another 300ms... and if another event was raised, re-start/extend that time again.. and so on and so on. Only if no other event was raised within the original or restarted TimeSpan(s)/ dueTime the someThrottledEventObservable should yield a new Unit instance.

I hope that makes sense - but basically I want/need a throttled stream of events that yields one event whenever the source stream has stopped yielding new events for a given time & if new events happen within that wait time the throttled stream should re-start waiting.

Or: In an ongoing 'storm' of events .Throttle() alone results in a new Unit every 300ms (in the example above) but I want exactly one new Unit whenever one or more events were fired but no new ones occurred within a 300ms coold-down-period thereafter.

How would I do that?

  • 1
    Not familiar with rx.net semantics, but it sounds like Throttle is behaving like sample rather than debounce, which reactivex.io claims to be the operation at play. Debounce should work like you've described (based on the documentation), and a fair rephrase of your question might be "how do I debounce in Reactive Extensions for .NET". – maxwellb Sep 21 '17 at 20:57
  • 1
    I think Throttle is already doing what you expect. It only emits the last event if there is no other event after the designated period. – nikoniko Sep 22 '17 at 3:44
  • @nikoniko yeah - I must be doing something wrong here.. not sure why, but after re-reading the documentation it clearly states that it should/does behave as I want it to.. apparently something else is causing events to trickle through / one is handled multiple times etc.. – Jörg Battermann Sep 22 '17 at 8:45
  • I've posted a new follow-up question because the observed behaviour is indeed a bit odd / different than what I'd expect: stackoverflow.com/questions/46361358/… – Jörg Battermann Sep 22 '17 at 9:31
0

As @nikoniko already mentioned, throttle will do the trick.

using System;
using System.Reactive.Linq;

namespace Printing {
class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        var source = Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(333))
            .Do(i => Console.WriteLine($"new item: {i}"));
        var sampling = source.Throttle(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1))
            .Do(i => Console.WriteLine($"sampled: {i}"));

        var subscription = sampling.Subscribe();

        Console.ReadLine();

        subscription.Dispose();

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

} Resulting in nothing because the events from source arrive in two high frequency. But if source need more time to deliver an element then the timespan given in throttle:

using System;
using System.Reactive.Linq;

namespace Printing {
    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
            var source = Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1.2))
                .Do(i => Console.WriteLine($"{DateTime.Now.ToShortTimeString()}: new item: {i}"));
            var sampling = source.Throttle(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1))
                .Do(i => Console.WriteLine($"{DateTime.Now.ToShortTimeString()}:  {i}"));

            var subscription = sampling.Subscribe();

            Console.ReadLine();

            subscription.Dispose();

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

The result will appear after throttling time is over. As you can see, on second after a event in source is fired, it will appear in the result.

08:32:26: new item: 0
08:32:27: throttle 0
08:32:28: new item: 1
08:32:29: throttle 1
08:32:30: new item: 2
08:32:31: throttle 2
08:32:32: new item: 3
08:32:33: throttle 3
08:32:34: new item: 4
08:32:35: throttle 4
08:32:36: new item: 5
08:32:37: throttle 5

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.