30

I am using ansible to replace the ssh keys for a user on multiple RHEL6 & RHEL7 servers. The task I am running is:

- name: private key   
  copy:
    src: /Users/me/Documents/keys/id_rsa
    dest: ~/.ssh/
    owner: unpriv
    group: unpriv
    mode: 0600
    backup: yes

Two of the hosts that I'm trying to update are giving the following error:

fatal: [host1]: FAILED! => {"failed": true, "msg": "Failed to set permissions on the temporary files Ansible needs to create when becoming an unprivileged user (rc: 1, err: chown: changing ownership of /tmp/ansible-tmp-19/': Operation not permitted\nchown: changing ownership of/tmp/ansible-tmp-19/stat.py': Operation not permitted\n). For information on working around this, see https://docs.ansible.com/ansible/become.html#becoming-an-unprivileged-user"}

The thing is that these two that are getting the errors are clones of some that are updating just fine. I've compared the sudoers and sshd settings, as well as permissions and mount options on the /tmp directory. They are all the same between the problem hosts and the working ones. Any ideas on what I could check next?

I am running ansible 2.3.1.0 on Mac OS Sierra, if that helps.

Update:

@techraf

I have no idea why this worked on all hosts except for two. Here is the original playbook:

- name: ssh_keys
  hosts: my_hosts
  remote_user: my_user
  tasks:
    - include: ./roles/common/tasks/keys.yml
      become: yes
      become_method: sudo

and original keys.yml:

- name: public key
  copy:
    src: /Users/me/Documents/keys/id_rsab
    dest: ~/.ssh/
    owner: unpriv
    group: unpriv
    mode: 060
    backup: yes

I changed the playbook to:

- name: ssh_keys
  hosts: my_hosts
  remote_user: my_user
  tasks:
    - include: ./roles/common/tasks/keys.yml
      become: yes
      become_method: sudo
      become_user: root

And keys.yml to:

- name: public key
  copy:
    src: /Users/me/Documents/keys/id_rsab
    dest: /home/unpriv/.ssh/
    owner: unpriv
    group: unpriv
    mode: 0600
    backup: yes

And it worked across all hosts.

3
  • Also... You have multiple RHEL6 and RHEL7 machines and the problem appears on two according to what you wrote. RHEL6 does not sound like a clone of RHEL7, so it's like one machine of each, or what?
    – techraf
    Sep 22, 2017 at 1:04
  • 1
    I appreciate anyone who takes the time to help, but the snide comment about understanding English accomplishes nothing. I'm new to Ansible and not sure what information is relevant when asking a question. Giving too much information is just as equally likely to draw insults as not providing enough. And you're correct, about RHEL 6 and RHEL 7. The point I was trying to get at was getting different results with what seemed to be consistent configurations on my target hosts.
    – Alex
    Sep 25, 2017 at 17:44
  • Well, it’s what you want to read that you read. Every error message can be understood on several levels. You can for example understand the English meaning of the error, but not understand the technical meaning (especially this one). I find no better phrasing. The English message clearly says “becoming unprivileged user”, so I asked why is there nothing in your question about ...becoming unprivileged user — a natural, and completely neutral question for me, a derogatory question for you.
    – techraf
    Sep 25, 2017 at 20:23

4 Answers 4

88

Try to install ACL on remote host, after that execute ansible script

sudo apt-get install acl

As explained in the doc

when both the connection user and the become_user are unprivileged, the module file is written as the user that Ansible connects as (the remote_user), but the file needs to be readable by the user Ansible is set to become. On POSIX systems, Ansible solves this problem in the following way:

First, if setfacl is installed and available in the remote PATH, and the temporary directory on the remote host is mounted with POSIX.1e filesystem ACL support, Ansible will use POSIX ACLs to share the module file with the second unprivileged user.

Next, if POSIX ACLs are not available or setfacl could not be run, Ansible will attempt to change ownership of the module file using chown for systems which support doing so as an unprivileged user

4
  • 7
    You nail it, but why is needed? Sep 18, 2020 at 2:38
  • This worked for me too, thanks a bunch. @DanielHernández it just means that some of the acl utilities ansible relies on weren't installed by default. I added acl to one of my tasks to ensure acl is installed and problem solved.
    – Nick Brady
    Oct 30, 2020 at 14:24
  • 5
    To expand on why it's needed, read docs.ansible.com/ansible/latest/user_guide/…. "Install POSIX.1e filesystem acl support on the managed host. If the temporary directory on the remote host is mounted with POSIX acls enabled and the setfacl tool is in the remote PATH then Ansible will use POSIX acls to share the module file with the second unprivileged user instead of having to make the file readable by everyone."
    – Eric Ihli
    Jan 22, 2021 at 15:32
  • In Amazon Linux 2023 this worked without installing acl. But for Amazon Linux 2, we need to install acl, which worked for me. Thanks for the valuable suggestion.
    – Samith
    Jul 20, 2023 at 11:31
10

You could try something like this:

- name: private key 
  become: true
  become_user: root
  copy:
    src: /Users/me/Documents/keys/id_rsa
    dest: ~/.ssh/
    owner: unpriv
    group: unpriv
    mode: 0600
    backup: yes

Notice the:

become: true
become_user: root

Check the "become" docs for more info

1
  • @Alex So if it solved the problem, do you mind elaborating on why the problem existed in the first place? The target machines were supposed to be identical, weren’t they?
    – techraf
    Sep 25, 2017 at 20:29
6

While installing the acl module works there is an alternative.

Add the line below to the defaults section of your ansible.cfg. allow_world_readable_tmpfiles = True

Of better, just add it to the task that needs it with:

  vars:
    allow_world_readable_tmpfiles: true

A similar question with more details is Becoming non root user in ansible fails

0

I'm using ad-hoc and when I got into this problem, adding -b --become-user ANSIBLE_USER to my command fixes my problem. example:

ansible all  -m file -a "path=/etc/s.text state=touch" -b --become-user ansadmin

Of course, before this, I had given Sudo access to the user

If you give Sudo access to your user, you can write like this :

ansible all  -m file -a "path=/var/s.text state=touch"  -b --become-user root

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