2

I am writing a minimal Lisp with a classic terminal-based REPL environment project in Rust.

How do I read in user input from the arrow keys, allowing them to move back and forth on their current line of input at least before they have pressed enter? Ideally, I will be able to extend functionality to include moving "back" to retrieve old inputs like you would in any terminal or any REPL. Here's an image of the behavior for clarity:

enter image description here

I have played around with the standard library's io module and the termion crate but have not figured this functionality out.

Here is my current working code. It effectively takes input and immediately prints it back to the user in addition to quitting as expected with quit().

use std::io::prelude::*;
use std::io;

fn main() {
    println!("Rispy Version 0.0.1");
    println!("Enter `quit()` to Exit");

    let mut input: String;

    // continuous input til ctrl-c or quit()
    loop {

        print!("rispy>> ");
        io::stdout().flush().unwrap();

        input = String::new();
        io::stdin().read_line(&mut input)
            .expect("Error reading line");

        print!("input: {}", input);

        match input.as_ref() {
            "quit()\n" => {
                println!("\nGoodbye");
                break;
            },
            _ => continue,
        }
    }
}
  • 3
    The easy way would be to use an existing crate. For example, readline wraps GNU readline, or rustyline is a rust implementation. – kazemakase Sep 22 '17 at 7:45
  • 1
    @kazemakase This is the answer. You should post it as an actual answer. – French Boiethios Sep 22 '17 at 9:21
  • 2
    @Boiethios I'm hesitant to post links to libraries as answers because that could imply that the question is off-topic, although alking for a library was not the OPs intent... The way I read the question the OP might actually want to implement this themself. – kazemakase Sep 22 '17 at 9:28
  • @kazemakase I know, but unless someone want to actually play with ncurses (that I would not recommend in this case), he should use one of those crates. Maybe you should post an answer like: "use ncurses directly, or use an existing implementation like rustyline. I recommend the latter." – French Boiethios Sep 22 '17 at 9:35
  • @Boiethios right. I won't be able to write up a good answer until after the weekend. Feel free to do so in my stead. ncurses is not the only option - you can also emit ascii codes for backspace or carriage return to overwrite the current line. – kazemakase Sep 22 '17 at 10:00
4

It's funny how some basic/fundamental crates are not suggested elsewhere more readily for problems like this but thankfully @kazemakase answered the question by suggesting a crate I had not found up to this point: rustyline

A slight edit to the example code on the readme yields the results I want, with history, the ability to navigate left/right with the arrow keys, and even the use of key strokes like ctrl-d, ctrl-c, home, etcetera. Here it is to couple with the question as asked:

extern crate rustyline;

use rustyline::Editor;
use rustyline::error::ReadlineError;

fn main() {
    println!("Rispy Version 0.0.1");
    println!("Enter `quit()` to Exit");

    let mut reader = Editor::<()>::new();
    if let Err(_) = reader.load_history("rispy_history.txt") {
        println!("No previous history.");
    }

    // continuous input
    loop {

        let readline = reader.readline("rispy>> ");

        match readline {
            Ok(line) => {
                reader.add_history_entry(&line);
                println!("input: {}", line);
            },
            Err(ReadlineError::Interrupted) => {
                println!("CTRL-C");
                println!("Goodbye");
                break
            }
            Err(ReadlineError::Eof) => {
                println!("CTRL-D");
                println!("Goodbye");
                break
            },
            Err(err) => {
                println!("Error: {:?}", err);
                break
            }
        }
    }
    reader.save_history("rispy_history.txt").unwrap();
}
  • Glad to hear my comment was helpful. You can accept your own answer if you think it's the best solution to your problem. – kazemakase Sep 25 '17 at 9:09
2

As an out-of-the-box answer, I occasionally use rlwrap, a small wrapper around any command line program that adds basic readline capabilities.

Running rlwrap cargo run, your original program now has editing like you asked, as well as command history and history searching, and probably a lot of other things.

  • I think this is a great answer and also am amazed by the fact I didn't know solutions close to this existed. That said, I am going through with selecting my answer (provided by @kazemakase in the comments) as the solution because it answers the problem from within the program rather than outside of it as I requested. – zaile Sep 22 '17 at 20:39

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