14

Set up MVC with the extension method

services.AddMvc()

Then in a controller, and this may apply to GET also, create a method for the POST action with a parameter supplied in the body, e.g.

[HttpPost("save")]
public Entity Save([FromBody]Entity someEntity)

When the action is called the MVC pipeline will call the ParameterBinder which in turn calls DefaultObjectValidator. I don't want the validation (its slow for one thing, but more importantly is looping on complex cyclical graphs), but it seems the only way to turn off validation in the pipeline is something like this:

public class NonValidatingValidator : IObjectModelValidator
{
    public void Validate(ActionContext actionContext, ValidationStateDictionary validationState, string prefix, object model)
    {
    }
}

and in the StartUp/ConfigureServices:

        var validator = services.FirstOrDefault(s => s.ServiceType == typeof(IObjectModelValidator));
        if (validator != null)
        {
            services.Remove(validator);
            services.Add(new ServiceDescriptor(typeof(IObjectModelValidator), _ => new NonValidatingValidator(), ServiceLifetime.Singleton));
        }

which seems like a sledgehammer. I've looked around and can't find an alternative, also tried to remove the DataAnnotationModelValidator without success, so would like to know if there's a better/correct way to turn off validation?

2
  • 2
    I think your solution is good. You can simplify the dependency registration with just: services.AddSingleton<IObjectModelValidator>(new NonValidatingValidator());
    – thejman
    Nov 14 '17 at 2:18
  • @thejman This is the correct answer
    – mrmashal
    Aug 19 '18 at 10:18
20
 services.Configure<ApiBehaviorOptions>(options =>
        {
            options.SuppressModelStateInvalidFilter = true;
        });

should disable automatic model state validation.

3
  • 1
    is this still valid for asp.net core 3.1? also is there any other thing which i can disable to improve my api response? Dec 23 '19 at 8:38
  • 2
    This answer is wrong. It only disables the handler of validation errors but doesn't disable validation itself!
    – disklosr
    Mar 8 '20 at 12:38
  • Its name is quite tricky. I guess the filter just handles the returned result in case of validation failure. It doesn't stop the validation from happening in the first place.
    – Nico
    yesterday
4

Use this extension method:

public static IServiceCollection DisableDefaultModelValidation(this IServiceCollection services)
{
  ServiceDescriptor serviceDescriptor = services.FirstOrDefault<ServiceDescriptor>((Func<ServiceDescriptor, bool>) (s => s.ServiceType == typeof (IObjectModelValidator)));
  if (serviceDescriptor != null)
  {
    services.Remove(serviceDescriptor);
    services.Add(new ServiceDescriptor(typeof (IObjectModelValidator), (Func<IServiceProvider, object>) (_ => (object) new EmptyModelValidator()), ServiceLifetime.Singleton));
  }
  return services;
}


public class EmptyModelValidator : IObjectModelValidator
{
  public void Validate(ActionContext actionContext, ValidationStateDictionary validationState, string prefix, object model)
  {
  }
}

Ussage:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.DisableDefaultModelValidation();
}
3

As of aspnet core 3.1, this is how you disable model validation as seen in docs:

First create this NullValidator class:

public class NullObjectModelValidator : IObjectModelValidator
{
    public void Validate(ActionContext actionContext,
        ValidationStateDictionary validationState, string prefix, object model)
    {

    }
}

Then use it in place of the real model validator:

services.AddSingleton<IObjectModelValidator, NullObjectModelValidator>();

Note that this only disable Model validation, you'll still get model binding errors.

2
  • I dont think this really adds significantly more than @thejman 's comment in the question, but will accept as the answer to close things out. Thanks!
    – S Waye
    Aug 30 '20 at 1:15
  • 1
    There is a big gotcha with this solution which you should be wary of (And cost me a lot of time to find out): When you use both this solution + the [ApiController] attribute [FromHeader] parameters in controllers will always automatically give a 400 bad request without any logging making it hard to find the source of the problem.
    – bramve
    Mar 31 at 13:17
2

You should consider to use the ValidateNeverAttribute, which is nearly undocumented and well hidden by Microsoft.

[ValidateNever]
public class Entity 
{
....
}

This gives you fine grained control over which entities to validate and which not.

1

The .AddMvc() extension method has an overload where you can configure a lot of things. One of these things is the list of ModelValidatorProviders.

If you clear this list, e.g.:

services.AddMvc(options => options.ModelValidatorProviders.Clear());

validation should not take place any longer.

3
  • Same unfortunately, this is part of the stack:` Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.Core.dll!Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.Internal.DefaultObjectValidator.Validate(Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.ActionContext actionContext, Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.ModelBinding.Validation.ValidationStateDictionary validationState, string prefix, object model) Unknown Non-user code. Skipped loading symbols. Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.Core.dll!Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.ModelBinding.ParameterBinder.BindModelAsync(Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.ActionContext actionContext, Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.ModelBinding.IModelBinder modelBinder`
    – S Waye
    Sep 28 '17 at 19:52
  • Same what? You are getting an exception now?
    – ypsilo0n
    Sep 30 '17 at 21:18
  • 1
    No, I mean its still calling the DefaultObjectValidator, I suppose there exists some code along the lines of "do we have a validator, if not add DefaultObjectValidator)
    – S Waye
    Oct 4 '17 at 18:23
1

Create empty model validator class.

public class EmptyModelValidator : IObjectModelValidator {
    public void Validate(
        ActionContext actionContext, 
        ValidationStateDictionary validationState,
        string prefix,
        object model) {
    }
}

Replace DefaultModelValidator with EmptyModelValidator in configure services method.

services.Replace(
    new ServiceDescriptor(typeof(IObjectModelValidator), 
    typeof(EmptyModelValidator),
    ServiceLifetime.Singleton)
);

EmptyModelValidator not validates model so ModelState.IsValid always return false.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.