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Why MSVC++ 2015 and its earlier versions allowed the definition of a pure virtual method inside the class declaration but On GCC 4.9 and I guess MSVC++ 2017 don't allow that:

    #include <iostream>     

    class A{
        public:
            virtual void Foo() = 0;
    };

    class B: public A {
        public:
            virtual void Foo() = 0 { std::cout << "B::Foo()" << std::endl;
            }; // Allowed on MSVC 2015 and old versions

            //virtual void Foo() = 0; // on newer versions
    };

    //void B::Foo(){
    //  std::cout << "B::Foo()" << std::endl;
    //}     // Ok here!

    class C : public B{
        public:
            void Foo(){
                B::Foo();
                std::cout << "C::Foo()" << std::endl;
            }
    };

    int main(){

    //  A aObj; // error
    //  B bObj; // error
        C cObj; // correct
        cObj.Foo();

        std::cout << std::endl;
        std::cin.get();
        return 0;
    }
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  • 1
    I don't think the language grammar strictly allows it. I agree that it should.
    – user2100815
    Sep 23, 2017 at 21:07
  • 1
    Probably because MSVC didn't implement the grammar described in the standard - most compilers don't..
    – user2100815
    Sep 23, 2017 at 21:10
  • 2
    "MSVC++ 2015 and earlier versions of C++" Perhaps that's MSVC++ 2015 and earlier versions of MSVC? This syntax was never valid in C++. Sep 23, 2017 at 21:14
  • 2
    "Why does/did MSVC have a bug" is a vacuous question. Such is life. Sep 23, 2017 at 21:22
  • 4
    It was a Visual C++ language extension. Visual C++ also had or maybe still has an extension where you can qualify overrides in a class with the name of the class the base version comes from. The g++ compiler has other language extensions, such as variable length arrays. Sep 23, 2017 at 21:40

1 Answer 1

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The standard explicitly mentions that that is not allowed (e.g. C++14, §10.4./2)

A function declaration cannot provide both a pure-specifier and a definition — end note ] [ Example: struct C { virtual void f() = 0 { }; // ill-formed }; — end example ]

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