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I am trying to create 2 panels through single function using compose:

make-panel: func [sentchar][
     probe compose/deep [
        text "N1:"    
        (to-set-word rejoin["fld1" sentchar ":"]) field    ; TO BE NAMED fld1A and fld1B for 2 panels
        text "N2: "   
        (to-set-word rejoin["fld1" sentchar ":"]) field    ; TO BE NAMED fld2A and fld2B for 2 panels      
        text "Product: "    
        (to-set-word rejoin ["txt_out" sentchar ":"]) text    ; TO BE NAMED txt_outA and txt_outB for 2 panels
        button "Get product" [ 
           x: to-path to-word (rejoin ["face/parent/pane/fld1" sentchar "/text"])
           y: to-path to-word (rejoin ["face/parent/pane/fld2" sentchar "/text"])
           (to-set-path (to-path rejoin ["face/parent/pane/txt_out" sentchar "text"] )) 
                form multiply get x get y  ]  ] ]

view compose [
    (make-panel "A") return 
    (make-panel "B") return ]

However, I am getting errors regarding to-word and to-path even though I have tried different combinations. Where is the problem?

5

Your error is in trying to create a word with a "/" character.

>> to-word "foo/bar"
*** Syntax Error: invalid character in: "foo/bar"
*** Where: to
*** Stack: to-word  

My second inclination is that you shouldn't be using strings to compose value references—if nothing else you lose binding. Can try the following:

to path! compose [face parent pane (to word! rejoin ["fld2" sentchar]) text]

My first inclination is that you're overcomplicating this, but that's beyond the scope of your question.

Update:

I will attempt to address some of the other issues in this code:

Naming

A note on make-panel—it's a misnomer as you are not making a panel, just grouping some element specs together. For the purposes of this answer, I'll use the name make-row. Also, I will never have any love for names like fld1 or tout (which is an actual word!) but will persevere.

Dynamic Named Selectors

As I mentioned above, you are always better off starting with words vs. strings as in Rebol/Red, words acquire context during evaluation—words loaded from strings do not. For example:

make object! [
    foo: "bar"
    probe get first [foo] ; "bar"
    probe get first load "[foo]" ; error
]

As you're creating three new words, let's do that explicitly:

make-row: function [row-id [string!]][
    fld1: to word! rejoin ["fld1-" row-id]
    fld2: to word! rejoin ["fld2-" row-id]
    tout: to word! rejoin ["tout-" row-id] ; note that 'tout is an English word

    ...
]

From here, we can start to build unique references in our spec.

make-row: func [row-id [string!] /local fld1 fld2 tout][
    fld1: to word! rejoin ["fld1-" row-id]
    fld2: to word! rejoin ["fld2-" row-id]
    tout: to word! rejoin ["tout-" row-id]

    compose/deep [
        text "N1:"
        (to set-word! fld1) field
        text "N2:"
        (to set-word! fld2) field
        text "Product:"
        (to set-word! tout) text
        button "Get Product" [
            ...
        ]
        return
    ]
]

Now we get into a sticky area with this button action:

x: to-path to-word (rejoin ["face/parent/pane/fld1" sentchar "/text"])
y: to-path to-word (rejoin ["face/parent/pane/fld2" sentchar "/text"])
(to-set-path (to-path rejoin ["face/parent/pane/tout" sentchar "text"] )) 
     form multiply get x get y  ]  ] ]

I think can express in pseudo-code what you're trying to do:

Product = text of product of N1 for this row * N2 for this row

The main error in your code here is you're mixing proximity references with your named references. If you examine face/parent/pane, it has no fld1*, fld2* or tout* references in there, it's just a block of face objects. As you've gone to the effort to make unique names, let's roll with that for the moment. Remember, we're still deep in a compose/deep operation:

x: get in (fld1) 'data
y: get in (fld2) 'data
set in (tout) 'text form x * y

We're much more concise now and everything should be working (note that 'data gives you the loaded value of 'text).

Proximity Selectors

My concern though by this point is we've a lot new words floating about and we needed that x and y. So let's return to the idea of proximity.

When you look at your composed View spec:

view probe compose [
    (make-row "A")
    (make-row "B")
]

You'll see that your main view face will contain a lot of children. To find faces within proximity of the button you're clicking, we first need to find the button within the face. Let's do this:

button "Get Product" [
    this: find face/parent/pane face
]

And as there's six preceding faces associated with the button, let's go to the beginning of this set:

button "Get Product" [
    this: skip find face/parent/pane face -6
]

Now we can do our calculations based on proximity:

button "Get Product" [
    here: find face/parent/pane face
    here/6/text: form here/2/data * here/4/data
]

Boom! We have the same product with only one word here as opposed to rows-count * 3 + x + y. Awesome!

As we're not generating any additional words, we don't even need a function to generate our rows, boils down to the following:

row: [
    text "N1:" field
    text "N2: " field
    text "Product: " text 100
    button "Get product" [
        ; go back six faces from current face
        here: skip find face/parent/pane face -6
        here/6/text: form here/2/data * here/4/data
    ]
    return
]

view compose [
    (row)
    (row)
]

Group Selectors

As you seem to have complex needs and can't always enumerate the fields you need, you can use the extra field to group fields together. We can do this by using block to contain the row-id and the field-id:

make-row: func [row-id][
    compose/deep [
        text "N1:" field extra [(row-id) "N1"]
        text "N2: " field extra [(row-id) "N2"]
        text "Product: " text 100 extra [(row-id) "Output"]

        button "Get product" extra (row-id) [
            ...
        ]
        return
    ]
]

view compose [
    (make-row "A") 
    (make-row "B")
]

Within the button action, we can collect all of the faces associated with the row:

faces: make map! collect [
    foreach kid face/parent/pane [
        if all [
            block? kid/extra
            face/extra = kid/extra/1
        ][
            keep kid/extra/2
            keep kid
        ]
    ]
]

This gives you a nice map! with all associated faces and a simple calculation:

faces/("Output")/text: form faces/("N1")/data * faces/("N2")/data

If you're only going to use it for the product, then you don't even need to collect:

product: 0
foreach kid face/parent/pane [
    if all [
        block? kid/extra
        face/extra = kid/extra/1
    ][
        product: product + kid/value
    ]
]
  • 1
    It is not working. On filling up fields and clicking button, I get *** Script Error: path face/parent/pane/fld1A/text is not valid for none! type; *** Where: get; *** Stack: view do-events do-actor do-safe (even though there are numbers in both fld1A and fld2A). – rnso Sep 24 '17 at 16:19
  • 2
    @rnso As I said, there's more problems here than the one you asked about. – rgchris Sep 24 '17 at 16:35
  • I do not want to use numbers for finding fields because that may not be easy if there are large number of fields and also if any middle field is added or deleted, all numbers will have to change. Can we get unique field names for different rows created by same function as I was trying? – rnso Sep 24 '17 at 17:35
  • What is the best way to go if one has to create many gui objects of same type? Can we do object oriented programming here? – rnso Sep 24 '17 at 17:39
  • 1
    re. numbers: You can go with the first part wrt. named fields, though I'd still be inclined against it. Words are always going to be middle-men and you're going to end up managing a lot of names in addition to fields. wrt. object oriented—absolutely, though you have to be careful the way you clone face objects. – rgchris Sep 24 '17 at 17:39
1

a real challenge

make-panel: func [sentchar][
    compose/deep [
        text "N1:"  (to-set-word rejoin['fld1 sentchar ]) field    ; TO BE NAMED fld1A and fld1B for 2 panels
        text "N2:"  (to-set-word rejoin['fld2 sentchar ]) field    ; TO BE NAMED fld2A and fld2B for 2 panels      
        text "Product: "  (to-set-word rejoin ['tout sentchar]) text    ; TO BE NAMED toutA and toutB for 2 panels
        button "Get product" [ 
            x:   ( to-path reduce   [ to-word  rejoin ["fld1" sentchar]  'text ])  
            y:    (to-path reduce   [ to-word  rejoin ["fld2" sentchar]  'text ])   
            (to-set-path reduce [to-word rejoin ["tout" sentchar] 'text])   form multiply load  x load  y
        ] 
    ]
]

view v: compose   [
    (make-panel "A") return 
    (make-panel "B") return 
]

Of course, you do not need the intermediary words x and y. But this you can do by yourself.

  • I have corrected the title accordingly. – rnso Sep 24 '17 at 18:16
  • 1
    Where does to to-word and to-path not work? Who claims that? – sqlab Sep 24 '17 at 18:16
  • And why the downvote? My solution works! – sqlab Sep 24 '17 at 18:18
  • Downvote is not by me. I have actually upvoted. – rnso Sep 24 '17 at 18:23
  • How can face/parent/pane be correctly used? – rnso Sep 24 '17 at 23:33

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