Look at this non-compiling snippet:

struct Object {
    template <RETURN (OBJECT::*MEMFN)(PARAMETERS...), typename RETURN, typename OBJECT, typename ...PARAMETERS>
    void call() {
    }
};

struct Foo {
    void fn();
};

int main() {
    Object o;
    o.call<&Foo::fn>();
}

Basically, what I want to achieve is to have a function (Object::call), which is specialized with any kind of member function pointers, with convenient syntax to call.

The nearest solution I found is this, which is very ugly:

struct Object {
};

template <typename MEMFNTYPE, MEMFNTYPE MEMFN>
struct Caller;

template <typename RETURN, typename OBJECT, typename ...PARAMETERS, RETURN (OBJECT::*MEMFN)(PARAMETERS...)>
struct Caller<RETURN (OBJECT::*)(PARAMETERS...), MEMFN> {
    Object *object;

    Caller(Object &o) : object(&o) { }

    void call() {
        // I have the necessary information here: the member function pointer as template parameter, and a pointer to Object
    }
};

struct Foo {
    void fn();
};

int main() {
    Object o;

    Caller<decltype(&Foo::fn), &Foo::fn>(o).call();
}

Is there a better solution for this problem?

(The reason is I'm trying to do this is that I'd like to create wrapper functions (call) for other member functions)


Kerrek SB suggested using auto, I've tried this:

struct Object {
    template <auto MEMFN>
    void call();

    template <auto MEMFN, typename RETURN, typename OBJECT, typename ...PARAMETERS>
    void call<RETURN (OBJECT::*MEMFN)(PARAMETERS...)>() {
    }
};

struct Foo {
    void fn();
};

int main() {
    Object o;
    o.call<&Foo::fn>();
}

However, this doesn't compile (Do I need to add MEMFN differently to the template parameter list (instead of auto MEMFN?):

t2.cpp:6:7: error: parse error in template argument list
  void call<RETURN (OBJECT::*MEMFN)(PARAMETERS...)>() {
       ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
t2.cpp:6:52: error: non-class, non-variable partial specialization ‘call<<expression error> >’ is not allowed
  void call<RETURN (OBJECT::*MEMFN)(PARAMETERS...)>() {
  • 1
    template <auto F> void call();, and then specialize. – Kerrek SB Sep 24 '17 at 18:00
  • Isn't that what std::bind() actually does? – user0042 Sep 24 '17 at 18:04
  • Are you asking for std::invoke? en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/functional/invoke – Travis Gockel Sep 24 '17 at 18:06
  • @KerrekSB: Thanks! I've tried it, and I got a compile error at specialization (I've updated the question) – geza Sep 24 '17 at 18:11
  • 1
    You can't specialize function templates partially, so you need an auxiliary class template. Here's a basic example. – Kerrek SB Sep 24 '17 at 19:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As was suggested in the comments, if you accept C++17 solutions, then auto is your friend. And so are <type_traits> and if constexpr:

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

struct Object {
    template <auto MEMFN>
    void call() {
        if constexpr (std::is_member_function_pointer_v<decltype(MEMFN)>)
            std::cout << "Is member\n";
    }
};

struct Foo {
    void fn();
};

int main() {
    Object o;
    o.call<&Foo::fn>();
}

The function body will only emit code that treats the parameter as a member function pointer if the type trait says it is indeed that. No specialization is required.

  • Thanks! Is is possible to create a version where call actually has the same parameter list as MEMFN has? "Reading" OBJECT/RETURN from MEMFN is possible with some template trickery, but I'm not sure how to read "PARAMETERS..." from MEMFN. – geza Sep 24 '17 at 18:41
  • @geza - You could (in a few ways), but whether or not you should depends on how you want to use them. – StoryTeller Sep 24 '17 at 18:44

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