6

I have started using Go for a web-service and have some database interaction (surprise!!!) and I have found this example:

tx, err := db.Begin()
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}
defer tx.Rollback()
stmt, err := tx.Prepare("INSERT INTO foo VALUES (?)")
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}
defer stmt.Close() // danger!
for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
    _, err = stmt.Exec(i)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
}
err = tx.Commit()
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}
// stmt.Close() runs here!

From http://go-database-sql.org/prepared.html

The example is well formulated an easy to understand. However, it leaves me with an unanswered question. Why defer the transaction Rollback call?

Why not just do the following:

err := tx.Commit()

if err != nil {
    log.Error(err)
    tx.Rollback()
}

Would defer tx.Rollback() not always attempt a rollback? Even if tx.Commit() was a success, or have I misunderstood something about defer?

  • 2
    Looks like a mistake. As you say you wouldn't want to rollback unless an error occurred. Also the log.Fatalf you wouldn't want in a real app. I suggest use the improve this page button and contact the author. – Kenny Grant Sep 26 '17 at 8:47
  • 1
    Thank you for your answer :) – Lars Nielsen Sep 26 '17 at 9:19
  • @KennyGrant Thumb up for improving this misleading example. – aristotll Sep 6 '19 at 8:05
  • @KennyGrant Using defer tx.Rollback() after beginning a transaction can be nice to avoid putting rollback logic for every other error during the lifespan of the transaction. Note that if the transaction is already committed, calling rollback will perform a NOP. That being said, with verbosity comes more control, so if speed is a concern, handling every rollback rather than using defer may be preferable (or for verbose logging, etc). – Kelly Flet Apr 23 at 17:09
3

The example is a little bit misleading. It uses log.Fatal(err) for error handling. You wouldn't normally do that, and instead return err. So the deferred rollback is there to ensure that the transaction is rolled back in case of an early return.

| improve this answer | |
  • Yeah I knew about the log.Fatal part :) Thank you very much for your answer – Lars Nielsen Sep 26 '17 at 9:20
4

The important thing is that if you defer tx.Rollback() you are sure that it will be called even if you do an early return and the "trick" is that calling tx.Rollback() on a committed transaction will not actually do the rollback, because once a transaction is committed, it's committed and there is no way to roll it back :) So this is a neat trick on how to keep the code simple.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.