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Let's say I have a Typescript project with the following (latest) packages:

  • q@1.5.0
  • typescript@2.5.2
  • @types/q@1.0.5

Now let's say in my project I define a function that returns a Promise (as defined by Typescript's native ambient declarations):

import * as q from "q";

function doSomethingElseAsync(): Promise<number> {
    return q.Promise<number>((resolve, reject) => {
        setTimeout(() => resolve(1), 5000);
    });
}

When compiling, Typescript complains with the following error:

error TS2322: Type 'Q.Promise<number>' is not assignable to type 'Promise<number>'.
  Types of property 'then' are incompatible.
    Type '<U>(onFulfill?: ((value: number) => IWhenable<U>) | undefined, onReject?: ((error: any) => IWhena...' is not assignable to type '<TResult1 = number, TResult2 = never>(onfulfilled?: ((value: number) => TResult1 | PromiseLike<TR...'.
      Types of parameters 'onFulfill' and 'onfulfilled' are incompatible.
        Type '((value: number) => TResult1 | PromiseLike<TResult1>) | null | undefined' is not assignable to type '((value: number) => IWhenable<TResult1 | TResult2>) | undefined'.
          Type 'null' is not assignable to type '((value: number) => IWhenable<TResult1 | TResult2>) | undefined'.

For a while, I thought it was because Q Promises just weren't compatible with Typescript's native declarations. However, if I add the async keyword to the function definition, the error disappears entirely.

I'm rather mystified by this behavior. Is this a bug in Typescript, Q, or the Q typings? Or is this some esoteric but expected behavior of the compiler?

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    possibly related? stackoverflow.com/questions/42689713/… basically... a q promise isn't a native promise. just like a bluebird promise isn't a native promise. – Kevin B Sep 26 '17 at 22:12
  • It doesn't matter whether it's a native promise or not so long as it fits the interface Typescript is expecting. Both Q and Bluebird promises work well enough in practice. – Craxal Sep 28 '17 at 18:04
  • right, but more importantly, do they match the interface? i don't think they do. – Kevin B Sep 28 '17 at 18:06
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    Ah, I think you're right. I swapped the return type of the async function to q.Promise and got a compiler error saying "it does not refer to a Promise-compatible constructor value." This makes sense, because q.Promise isn't a constructor you call with new. – Craxal Sep 28 '17 at 18:47
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My guess would be that adding the async keyword to your function causes Javascript to wrap the return value of that function in a native Promise so that whether the function returns a promise or a value, the result will be a promise that can be awaited.

For example, it would do something like this:

Promise.resolve().then(() => doSomethingElseAsync())

Without the async keyword, you're returning a q promise, which is not an instance of a native Promise, so you're getting a type error for it.

I believe it would work fine like this as well (with the q removed):

function doSomethingElseAsync(): Promise<number> {
    return Promise<number>((resolve, reject) => {
        setTimeout(() => resolve(1), 5000);
    });
}

Or if your environment doesn't include the native Promise class, perhaps changing the return type might work, like this:

function doSomethingElseAsync(): q.Promise<number> {
    return q.Promise<number>((resolve, reject) => {
        setTimeout(() => resolve(1), 5000);
    });
}
  • Wrapping the return value in a native promise sounds more like an implementation detail of async/await. Once the JavaScript is output, types don't factor in anymore. Removing Q wouldn't work if my target is ES5, which doesn't implement native promises. That's why I'm using an external implementation like Q. – Craxal Sep 28 '17 at 18:06
  • I updated the answer with a potential ES5 solution as well if you don't have Promises available natively – Griffin Sep 28 '17 at 18:12
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    Also, yes, sorry, the wrapping was more a thought on potentially how async/await works vs. how to solve your problem. – Griffin Sep 28 '17 at 18:13
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It looks like the problem is simply that Q promises are incompatible with async/await.

I tried swapping the return type of the async fuction from the native Promise to q.Promise. The compiler now gives me this error:

Type '<T>(resolver: (resolve: (val?: T | PromiseLike<T> | undefined) => void, reject: (reason?: any) =>...' is not a valid async function return type in ES5/ES3 because it does not refer to a Promise-compatible constructor value.
  Type '<T>(resolver: (resolve: (val?: T | PromiseLike<T> | undefined) => void, reject: (reason?: any) =>...' provides no match for the signature 'new <T>(executor: (resolve: (value?: T | PromiseLike<T> | undefined) => void, reject: (reason?: any) => void) => void): PromiseLike<T>'.

It says the return type "is not a valid async function return type in ES5/ES3 because it does not refer to a Promise-compatible constructor value." This makes sense, because q.Promise isn't a constructor function you can call with new. In contrast, other promise implementations, such as Bluebird, do have compatible constructor functions.

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