67

I have this code:

int main()
{
    vector<int> res;
    res.push_back(1);
    vector<int>::iterator it = res.begin();
    for( ; it != res.end(); it++)
    {
        it = res.erase(it);
        //if(it == res.end())
        //  return 0;
    }
}

"A random access iterator pointing to the new location of the element that followed the last element erased by the function call, which is the vector end if the operation erased the last element in the sequence."

This code crashes, but if I use the if(it == res.end()) portion and then return, it works. How come? Does the for loop cache the res.end() so the not equal operator fails?

144

res.erase(it) always returns the next valid iterator, if you erase the last element it will point to .end()

At the end of the loop ++it is always called, so you increment .end() which is not allowed.

Simply checking for .end() still leaves a bug though, as you always skip an element on every iteration (it gets 'incremented' by the return from .erase(), and then again by the loop)

You probably want something like:

 while (it != res.end()) {
        it = res.erase(it);    
 }

to erase each element

(for completeness: I assume this is a simplified example, if you simply want every element gone without having to perform an operation on it (e.g. delete) you should simply call res.clear())

When you only conditionally erase elements, you probably want something like

for ( ; it != res.end(); ) {
  if (condition) {
    it = res.erase(it);
  } else {
    ++it;
  }
}
  • ok so it first increment and after the incrementation it compares – hidayat Jan 10 '11 at 10:30
  • No, hidayat; your code is trying to delete all elements in the vector one by one. To do so, you should start at res.begin() and then never advance the iterator, but retrieve the iterator returned when erasing an element (the same goes for all STL containers). The increment itself is the part that's wrong. – Mephane Jan 10 '11 at 10:35
  • in the real code i am not trying to delete all the elements, but thanks, i understand what i did wrong now – hidayat Jan 10 '11 at 10:38
  • Hi , I am doing in the same way , but still I am getting "out_of_range" error. Can you please tell me why ? – DukeLover Feb 17 '16 at 7:28
  • @DukeLover you must do a iterator++ while it's equal to .end() somewhere, without seeing any code that's all I can guess. If you can't figure it out, maybe pose a question? – Pieter Feb 17 '16 at 7:41
28
for( ; it != res.end();)
{
    it = res.erase(it);
}

or, more general:

for( ; it != res.end();)
{
    if (smth)
        it = res.erase(it);
    else
        ++it;
}
  • 3
    Why not use a while? – chamini2 Jun 21 '15 at 6:48
  • @chamini2 A while loop would be equivalent in this case. – glhrmv Nov 18 '18 at 14:06
1

As a modification to crazylammer's answer, I often use:

your_vector_type::iterator it;
for( it = res.start(); it != res.end();)
{
    your_vector_type::iterator curr = it++;
    if (something)
        res.erase(curr);
}

The advantage of this is that you don't have to worry about forgetting to increment your iterator, making it less bug prone when you have complex logic. Inside the loop, curr will never be equal to res.end(), and it will be at the next element regardless of if you erase it from your vector.

1

Because the method erase in vector return the next iterator of the passed iterator.

I will give example of how to remove element in vector when iterating.

void test_del_vector(){
    std::vector<int> vecInt{0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};

    //method 1
    for(auto it = vecInt.begin();it != vecInt.end();){
        if(*it % 2){// remove all the odds
            it = vecInt.erase(it); // note it will = next(it) after erase
        } else{
            ++it;
        }
    }

    // output all the remaining elements
    for(auto const& it:vecInt)std::cout<<it;
    std::cout<<std::endl;

    // recreate vecInt, and use method 2
    vecInt = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    //method 2
    for(auto it=std::begin(vecInt);it!=std::end(vecInt);){
        if (*it % 2){
            it = vecInt.erase(it);
        }else{
            ++it;
        }
    }

    // output all the remaining elements
    for(auto const& it:vecInt)std::cout<<it;
    std::cout<<std::endl;

    // recreate vecInt, and use method 3
    vecInt = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    //method 3
    vecInt.erase(std::remove_if(vecInt.begin(), vecInt.end(),
                 [](const int a){return a % 2;}),
                 vecInt.end());

    // output all the remaining elements
    for(auto const& it:vecInt)std::cout<<it;
    std::cout<<std::endl;

}

output aw below:

024
024
024

A more generate method:

template<class Container, class F>
void erase_where(Container& c, F&& f)
{
    c.erase(std::remove_if(c.begin(), c.end(),std::forward<F>(f)),
            c.end());
}

void test_del_vector(){
    std::vector<int> vecInt{0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    //method 4
    auto is_odd = [](int x){return x % 2;};
    erase_where(vecInt, is_odd);

    // output all the remaining elements
    for(auto const& it:vecInt)std::cout<<it;
    std::cout<<std::endl;    
}
0

Do not erase and then increment the iterator. No need to increment, if your vector has an odd (or even, I don't know) number of elements you will miss the end of the vector.

0

The it++ instruction is done at the end of the block. So if your are erasing the last element, then you try to increment the iterator that is pointing to an empty collection.

0

You increment it past the end of the (empty) container in the for loop's loop expression.

0

The following also seems to work :

for (vector<int>::iterator it = res.begin(); it != res.end(); it++)
{
  res.erase(it--);
}

Not sure if there's any flaw in this ?

  • While this code may answer the question, it is better to explain what it does and add some references to it. – Hamid Pourjam Dec 25 '15 at 13:03
  • 1
    I'm unsure about the code above. There are 3 main problems that I see. First, you don't sign back res.erase(it) back to it after removal. You must not have it++ inside for iterator statement while removing things thus you should have a conditional check to erase it. If the condition fails then you shall iterate to next (it++). Though I wonder why you have it--? Pardon me but why do you even decrement the iterator? Maybe I stumble, if that is the case I apologize. – Volkan Güven Sep 8 '17 at 0:51
  • @VG Thanks, I guess your comment addresses the question in the answer, therefore making it educational and maybe worth mentioning. I'm afraid I don't understand the logic of the it-- either anymore, too much water has flowed under the bridge since then… – Skippy le Grand Gourou Sep 8 '17 at 10:01
  • @SkippyleGrandGourou Thanks for the reply, I haven't really found something that matches the decrement status above. Could that be the case to iterate back a step after removal? Maybe it is identical to it = res.erase(it)? Though I really doubt that. Hmmmm – Volkan Güven Sep 8 '17 at 10:18
  • @VG : According to Pieter's answer, "res.erase(it) always returns the next valid iterator". I guess it-- and it++ cancel, so to my understanding this piece of code keeps erasing the (new) first element. Perform it-- doesn't seem a great idea, though, it now being the first element… – Skippy le Grand Gourou Sep 18 '17 at 12:02
0
if(allPlayers.empty() == false) {
    for(int i = allPlayers.size() - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        if(allPlayers.at(i).getpMoney() <= 0) 
            allPlayers.erase(allPlayers.at(i));
    }
}

This works for me. And Don't need to think about indexes have already erased.

  • How can you say this works for you? You never tested that. This does not even compile. alllPlayers.at(i) does not return an iterator. But erase() expects an iterator. – Elmue Nov 14 '17 at 12:53

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