57

I am replacing my old JSON parsing code with Swift's Codable and am running into a bit of a snag. I guess it isn't as much a Codable question as it is a DateFormatter question.

Start with a struct

 struct JustADate: Codable {
    var date: Date
 }

and a json string

let json = """
  { "date": "2017-06-19T18:43:19Z" }
"""

now lets decode

let decoder = JSONDecoder()
decoder.dateDecodingStrategy = .iso8601

let data = json.data(using: .utf8)!
let justADate = try! decoder.decode(JustADate.self, from: data) //all good

But if we change the date so that it has fractional seconds, for example:

let json = """
  { "date": "2017-06-19T18:43:19.532Z" }
"""

Now it breaks. The dates sometimes come back with fractional seconds and sometimes do not. The way I used to solve it was in my mapping code I had a transform function that tried both dateFormats with and without the fractional seconds. I am not quite sure how to approach it using Codable however. Any suggestions?

1
  • As I shared on the post above, I am not having issues with the formatting itself, rather that the API returns two different formats. Sometimes with fractional seconds and sometimes without. I have not been able to find a way to handle both possibilities. Sep 27, 2017 at 23:14

4 Answers 4

90

You can use two different date formatters (with and without fraction seconds) and create a custom DateDecodingStrategy. In case of failure when parsing the date returned by the API you can throw a DecodingError as suggested by @PauloMattos in comments:

iOS 9, macOS 10.9, tvOS 9, watchOS 2, Xcode 9 or later

The custom ISO8601 DateFormatter:

extension Formatter {
    static let iso8601withFractionalSeconds: DateFormatter = {
        let formatter = DateFormatter()
        formatter.calendar = Calendar(identifier: .iso8601)
        formatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
        formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(secondsFromGMT: 0)
        formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSXXXXX"
        return formatter
    }()
    static let iso8601: DateFormatter = {
        let formatter = DateFormatter()
        formatter.calendar = Calendar(identifier: .iso8601)
        formatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
        formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(secondsFromGMT: 0)
        formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ssXXXXX"
        return formatter
    }()
}

The custom DateDecodingStrategy:

extension JSONDecoder.DateDecodingStrategy {
    static let customISO8601 = custom {
        let container = try $0.singleValueContainer()
        let string = try container.decode(String.self)
        if let date = Formatter.iso8601withFractionalSeconds.date(from: string) ?? Formatter.iso8601.date(from: string) {
            return date
        }
        throw DecodingError.dataCorruptedError(in: container, debugDescription: "Invalid date: \(string)")
    }
}

The custom DateEncodingStrategy:

extension JSONEncoder.DateEncodingStrategy {
    static let customISO8601 = custom {
        var container = $1.singleValueContainer()
        try container.encode(Formatter.iso8601withFractionalSeconds.string(from: $0))
    }
}

edit/update:

Xcode 10 • Swift 4.2 or later • iOS 11.2.1 or later

ISO8601DateFormatter now supports formatOptions .withFractionalSeconds:

extension Formatter {
    static let iso8601withFractionalSeconds: ISO8601DateFormatter = {
        let formatter = ISO8601DateFormatter()
        formatter.formatOptions = [.withInternetDateTime, .withFractionalSeconds]
        return formatter
    }()
    static let iso8601: ISO8601DateFormatter = {
        let formatter = ISO8601DateFormatter()
        formatter.formatOptions = [.withInternetDateTime]
        return formatter
    }()
}

The customs DateDecodingStrategy and DateEncodingStrategy would be the same as shown above.


// Playground testing
struct ISODates: Codable {
    let dateWith9FS: Date
    let dateWith3FS: Date
    let dateWith2FS: Date
    let dateWithoutFS: Date
}

let isoDatesJSON = """
{
"dateWith9FS": "2017-06-19T18:43:19.532123456Z",
"dateWith3FS": "2017-06-19T18:43:19.532Z",
"dateWith2FS": "2017-06-19T18:43:19.53Z",
"dateWithoutFS": "2017-06-19T18:43:19Z",
}
"""

let isoDatesData = Data(isoDatesJSON.utf8)

let decoder = JSONDecoder()
decoder.dateDecodingStrategy = .customISO8601

do {
    let isoDates = try decoder.decode(ISODates.self, from: isoDatesData)
    print(Formatter.iso8601withFractionalSeconds.string(from: isoDates.dateWith9FS))   // 2017-06-19T18:43:19.532Z
    print(Formatter.iso8601withFractionalSeconds.string(from: isoDates.dateWith3FS))   // 2017-06-19T18:43:19.532Z
    print(Formatter.iso8601withFractionalSeconds.string(from: isoDates.dateWith2FS))   // 2017-06-19T18:43:19.530Z
    print(Formatter.iso8601withFractionalSeconds.string(from: isoDates.dateWithoutFS)) // 2017-06-19T18:43:19.000Z
} catch {
    print(error)
}
6
  • 1
    Great idea. Not sure why I didn't think about that one!!! Sometimes it just takes an extra pair of eyes to see the obvious... Sep 28, 2017 at 1:05
  • 1
    Yup my plan is to use the nil coalescing operator approach in the custom decoder. Should work great. Thanks again. Sep 28, 2017 at 1:15
  • 1
    Creating a new error type might look like a good idea initially but I would say you are better off throwing the standard DecodingError instead — the case dataCorrupted might just be what you were looking for ;) Dec 3, 2017 at 19:21
  • 1
    Good extension~~ Apr 1, 2019 at 1:59
  • 2
    @leodabus FYI: the Swift4/iOS 11 decoding does not work for the dateWithoutFS. On the other hand, the original extension works well.
    – Fmessina
    Sep 11, 2019 at 8:58
4

Swift 5

To parse ISO8601 string to date you have to use DateFormatter. In newer systems (f.ex. iOS11+) you can use ISO8601DateFormatter.

As long as you don't know if date contains milliseconds, you should create 2 formatters for each case. Then, during parsing String to Date use both consequently.

DateFormatter for older systems

/// Formatter for ISO8601 with milliseconds
lazy var iso8601FormatterWithMilliseconds: DateFormatter = {
    let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
    dateFormatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
    dateFormatter.timeZone = TimeZone(abbreviation: "GMT")
    dateFormatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZ"

    return dateFormatter
}()

/// Formatter for ISO8601 without milliseconds
lazy var iso8601Formatter: DateFormatter = {
    let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
    dateFormatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
    dateFormatter.timeZone = TimeZone(abbreviation: "GMT")
    dateFormatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ssZZZZZ"

    return dateFormatter
}()

ISO8601DateFormatter for newer systems (f.ex. iOS 11+)

lazy var iso8601FormatterWithMilliseconds: ISO8601DateFormatter = {
    let formatter = ISO8601DateFormatter()

    // GMT or UTC -> UTC is standard, GMT is TimeZone
    formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(abbreviation: "GMT")
    formatter.formatOptions = [.withInternetDateTime,
                               .withDashSeparatorInDate,
                               .withColonSeparatorInTime,
                               .withTimeZone,
                               .withFractionalSeconds]

    return formatter
}()

/// Formatter for ISO8601 without milliseconds
lazy var iso8601Formatter: ISO8601DateFormatter = {
    let formatter = ISO8601DateFormatter()

    // GMT or UTC -> UTC is standard, GMT is TimeZone
    formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(abbreviation: "GMT")
    formatter.formatOptions = [.withInternetDateTime,
                               .withDashSeparatorInDate,
                               .withColonSeparatorInTime,
                               .withTimeZone]

    return formatter
}()

Summary

As you can notice there is 2 formatters to create. If you want to support older systems, it makes 4 formatters. To make it more simple, check out Tomorrow on GitHub where you can see entire solution for this problem.

To convert String to Date you use:

let date = Date.fromISO("2020-11-01T21:10:56.22+02:00")

9
  • "If you want to support older systems, it makes 4 formatters." Why ? The old approach works for all of them
    – Leo Dabus
    Sep 29, 2020 at 20:35
  • Btw why are you using a single Z in one format and ZZZZZ at the other? Note that Z does NOT uses Z for UTC timezone representation it uses +0000 while ZZZZZ which is the same as XXXXX uses Z. In other words you should use XXXXX or ZZZZZ for both of them.
    – Leo Dabus
    Sep 29, 2020 at 20:40
  • @LeoDabus There is parser for date with milliseconds and without. And because there is old and new way of doing that it makes 4 formatters. If you ask why to use new formatter instead the old one, on Apple docs you can find the statement When working with date representations in ISO 8601 format, use ISO8601DateFormatter instead.. As ISO8601DateFormatter is working just in iOS10 and newer, this solution support old and new platform at once.
    – lukszar
    Oct 1, 2020 at 9:05
  • No ISO8601DateFormatter withFractionalSeconds does NOT work for iOS 10 and or iOS11. It only works for iOS 11.2.1 or later before that only without fractional seconds.
    – Leo Dabus
    Oct 6, 2020 at 0:14
  • 1
    @LeoDabus you are right. There is probably mistake in Apple documentation. I checked on 11.0.1 and error appeared indeed.
    – lukszar
    Oct 9, 2020 at 17:22
3

A new option (as of Swift 5.1) is a Property Wrapper. The CodableWrappers library has an easy way to deal with this.

For default ISO8601

@ISO8601DateCoding 
struct JustADate: Codable {
    var date: Date
 }

If you want a custom version:

// Custom coder
@available(macOS 10.12, iOS 10.0, watchOS 3.0, tvOS 10.0, *)
public struct FractionalSecondsISO8601DateStaticCoder: StaticCoder {

    private static let iso8601Formatter: ISO8601DateFormatter = {
        let formatter = ISO8601DateFormatter()
        formatter.formatOptions = .withFractionalSeconds
        return formatter
    }()

    public static func decode(from decoder: Decoder) throws -> Date {
        let stringValue = try String(from: decoder)
        guard let date = iso8601Formatter.date(from: stringValue) else {
            throw DecodingError.dataCorrupted(DecodingError.Context(codingPath: decoder.codingPath, debugDescription: "Expected date string to be ISO8601-formatted."))
        }
        return date
    }

    public static func encode(value: Date, to encoder: Encoder) throws {
        try iso8601Formatter.string(from: value).encode(to: encoder)
    }
}
// Property Wrapper alias
public typealias ISO8601FractionalDateCoding = CodingUses<FractionalSecondsISO8601DateStaticCoder>

// Usage
@ISO8601FractionalDateCoding
struct JustADate: Codable {
    var date: Date
 }
1
  • This is wrong. You are only specifying .fractionalSeconds. It should be [.withInternetDateTime, .withFractionalSeconds]. Another option is to simply insert .withFractionalSeconds to the ISO8601DateFormatter default options.
    – Leo Dabus
    Sep 29, 2020 at 20:32
0

Alternatively to @Leo's answer, and if you need to provide support for older OS'es (ISO8601DateFormatter is available only starting with iOS 10, mac OS 10.12), you can write a custom formatter that uses both formats when parsing the string:

class MyISO8601Formatter: DateFormatter {

    static let formatters: [DateFormatter] = [
        iso8601Formatter(withFractional: true),
        iso8601Formatter(withFractional: false)
        ]

    static func iso8601Formatter(withFractional fractional: Bool) -> DateFormatter {
        let formatter = DateFormatter()
        formatter.calendar = Calendar(identifier: .iso8601)
        formatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
        formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(secondsFromGMT: 0)
        formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss\(fractional ? ".SSS" : "")XXXXX"
        return formatter
    }

    override public func getObjectValue(_ obj: AutoreleasingUnsafeMutablePointer<AnyObject?>?,
                                 for string: String,
                                 errorDescription error: AutoreleasingUnsafeMutablePointer<NSString?>?) -> Bool {
        guard let date = (type(of: self).formatters.flatMap { $0.date(from: string) }).first else {
            error?.pointee = "Invalid ISO8601 date: \(string)" as NSString
            return false
        }
        obj?.pointee = date as NSDate
        return true
    }

    override public func string(for obj: Any?) -> String? {
        guard let date = obj as? Date else { return nil }
        return type(of: self).formatters.flatMap { $0.string(from: date) }.first
    }
}

, which you can use it as date decoding strategy:

let decoder = JSONDecoder()
decoder.dateDecodingStrategy = .formatted(MyISO8601Formatter())

Although a little bit uglier in implementation, this has the advantage of being consistent with the decoding errors that Swift throws in case of malformed data, as we don't alter the error reporting mechanism).

For example:

struct TestDate: Codable {
    let date: Date
}

// I don't advocate the forced unwrap, this is for demo purposes only
let jsonString = "{\"date\":\"2017-06-19T18:43:19Z\"}"
let jsonData = jsonString.data(using: .utf8)!
let decoder = JSONDecoder()
decoder.dateDecodingStrategy = .formatted(MyISO8601Formatter())
do {
    print(try decoder.decode(TestDate.self, from: jsonData))
} catch {
    print("Encountered error while decoding: \(error)")
}

will print TestDate(date: 2017-06-19 18:43:19 +0000)

Adding the fractional part

let jsonString = "{\"date\":\"2017-06-19T18:43:19.123Z\"}"

will result in the same output: TestDate(date: 2017-06-19 18:43:19 +0000)

However using an incorrect string:

let jsonString = "{\"date\":\"2017-06-19T18:43:19.123AAA\"}"

will print the default Swift error in case of incorrect data:

Encountered error while decoding: dataCorrupted(Swift.DecodingError.Context(codingPath: [__lldb_expr_84.TestDate.(CodingKeys in _B178608BE4B4E04ECDB8BE2F689B7F4C).date], debugDescription: "Date string does not match format expected by formatter.", underlyingError: nil))
6
  • This won't work for both cases (with or without fractional seconds)
    – Leo Dabus
    Jan 23, 2018 at 3:27
  • The only alternative is for iOS 11 or later you can use ISO8601DateFormatter formatOptions .withFractionalSeconds instead of using DateFormatter but the custom dateDecodingStrategy approach remains the same so there is no advantage using it considering the disadvantage of the iOS 11 or later restriction.
    – Leo Dabus
    Jan 23, 2018 at 16:15
  • Why would you waste your time with this? kkkk The custom implementation it is much cleaner and it throws a DecodingError. Btw my original answer does work with iOS10 and doesn't require ISO8601DateFormatter
    – Leo Dabus
    Jan 25, 2018 at 7:01
  • I can choose any dateEncodingStrategy also when encoding
    – Leo Dabus
    Jan 25, 2018 at 7:14
  • No worries I just wanted to show you how to implement it both ways. Better to use the appropriate method instead of hacking around it
    – Leo Dabus
    Jan 25, 2018 at 19:34

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