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Why is it good practice to assign state variables to React's state? I'm a react beginner. I'm trying to understand the purpose of a separate state object. Naively, it seems just as good (and a little shorter), to write in a component:

this.foo = 3;

instead of:

this.state.foo = 3;

I understand that setState triggers a rerender, but it seems you could just easily set the state you want and then trigger a rerender directly. I've been using this.setState({}).

In all other cases, React appears to adhere to principles of simplicity. React tends to favor native JavaScript functionality over additional React-defined functionality except where additional functionality is absolutely required. Why did the creators of React go out of their way to give React state?

In-Depth Example

As a longer example, I can define a component Counter that increases its count every second. The first way uses react's state property. The second attaches its state directly to the instance.

Using state:

class Counter extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = {count: 0};

        setInterval((() => {
            this.setState(previousState => ({ 
                count: previousState.count + 1 }));
        }), 1000);
    }

    render() {
        return <h1>{this.state.count}</h1>;
    }
}

Attaching properties directly to the instance:

class Counter extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.count = 0;

        setInterval((() => {
            this.count += 1;
            this.setState({})
        }), 1000);
    }

    render() {
        return <h1>{this.count}</h1>;
    }
}
  • 1
    In my mind, it's just about being explicit. The state is represented by this specific thing, so it knows to re-render when that changes. Otherwise, as you said, you would need to manually trigger a render when you know something in your class level vars have changed. Or alternatively use some method to make those specific pieces observable. – Evan Trimboli Sep 28 '17 at 2:49

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