17

I'm using WebClient and custom BodyExtractorclass for my spring-boot application

WebClient webLCient = WebClient.create();
webClient.get()
   .uri(url, params)
   .accept(MediaType.APPLICATION.XML)
   .exchange()
   .flatMap(response -> {
     return response.body(new BodyExtractor());
   })

BodyExtractor.java

@Override
public Mono<T> extract(ClientHttpResponse response, BodyExtractor.Context context) {
  Flux<DataBuffer> body = response.getBody();
  body.map(dataBuffer -> {
    try {
      JaxBContext jc = JaxBContext.newInstance(SomeClass.class);
      Unmarshaller unmarshaller = jc.createUnmarshaller();

      return (T) unmarshaller.unmarshal(dataBuffer.asInputStream())
    } catch(Exception e){
       return null;
    }
  }).next();
}

Above code works with small payload but not on a large payload, I think it's because I'm only reading a single flux value with next and I'm not sure how to combine and read all dataBuffer.

I'm new to reactor, so I don't know a lot of tricks with flux/mono.

5

A slightly modified version of Bk Santiago's answer makes use of reduce() instead of collect(). Very similar, but doesn't require an extra class:

Java:

body.reduce(new InputStream() {
    public int read() { return -1; }
  }, (s: InputStream, d: DataBuffer) -> new SequenceInputStream(s, d.asInputStream())
).flatMap(inputStream -> /* do something with single InputStream */

Or Kotlin:

body.reduce(object : InputStream() {
  override fun read() = -1
}) { s: InputStream, d -> SequenceInputStream(s, d.asInputStream()) }
  .flatMap { inputStream -> /* do something with single InputStream */ }

Benefit of this approach over using collect() is simply you don't need to have a different class to gather things up.

I created a new empty InputStream(), but if that syntax is confusing, you can also replace it with ByteArrayInputStream("".toByteArray()) instead to create an empty ByteArrayInputStream as your initial value instead.

3

I was able to make it work by using Flux#collect and SequenceInputStream

@Override
public Mono<T> extract(ClientHttpResponse response, BodyExtractor.Context context) {
  Flux<DataBuffer> body = response.getBody();
  return body.collect(InputStreamCollector::new, (t, dataBuffer)-> t.collectInputStream(dataBuffer.asInputStream))
    .map(inputStream -> {
      try {
        JaxBContext jc = JaxBContext.newInstance(SomeClass.class);
        Unmarshaller unmarshaller = jc.createUnmarshaller();

        return (T) unmarshaller.unmarshal(inputStream);
      } catch(Exception e){
        return null;
      }
  }).next();
}

InputStreamCollector.java

public class InputStreamCollector {
  private InputStream is;

  public void collectInputStream(InputStream is) {
    if (this.is == null) this.is = is;
    this.is = new SequenceInputStream(this.is, is);
  }

  public InputStream getInputStream() {
    return this.is;
  }
}
  • 2
    why are you writing your own BodyExtractor? WebFlux already supports Jaxb with Jaxb2XmlDecoder. – Brian Clozel Sep 28 '17 at 9:28
  • @BrianClozel do I need to configure something for it to work? bodyToMono doesn't seem to pick up my pojo's. – Bk Santiago Sep 29 '17 at 1:30
  • What's InputStreamCollector? – Abhijit Sarkar Dec 7 '17 at 0:09
  • 2
    Interesting, but WebClient is the wrong tool for this job. You're reconstructing the response InputStream, so you get no advantage of using WebClient. You're better off using a plain vanilla HTTP client. – Abhijit Sarkar Dec 14 '17 at 3:50
  • 2
    Isn't this solution reads all response body into memory? ByteBuffer stores all it's data in memory, right? So resulting InputStream will be the same as ByteArrayInputStream, so this solution doesn't handle big data. – Ruslan Stelmachenko Aug 24 '18 at 1:02
3

This is really not as complicated as other answers imply.

The only way to stream the data without buffering it all in memory is to use a pipe, as @jin-kwon suggested. However, it can be done very simply by using Spring's BodyExtractors and DataBufferUtils utility classes.

Example:

private InputStream readAsInputStream(String url) throws IOException {
    PipedOutputStream osPipe = new PipedOutputStream();
    PipedInputSteam isPipe = new PipedInputStream(osPipe);

    ClientResponse response = webClient.get().uri(url)
        .accept(MediaType.APPLICATION.XML)
        .exchange()
        .block();
    final int statusCode = response.rawStatusCode();
    // check HTTP status code, can throw exception if needed
    // ....

    Flux<DataBuffer> body = response.body(BodyExtractors.toDataBuffers())
        .doOnError(t -> {
            log.error("Error reading body.", t);
            // close pipe to force InputStream to error,
            // otherwise the returned InputStream will hang forever if an error occurs
            try(isPipe) {
              //no-op
            } catch (IOException ioe) {
                log.error("Error closing streams", ioe);
            }
        })
        .doFinally(s -> {
            try(osPipe) {
              //no-op
            } catch (IOException ioe) {
                log.error("Error closing streams", ioe);
            }
        });

    DataBufferUtils.write(body, osPipe)
        .subscribe(DataBufferUtils.releaseConsumer());

    return isPipe;
}

If you don't care about checking the response code or throwing an exception for a failure status code, you can skip the block() call and intermediate ClientResponse variable by using

flatMap(r -> r.body(BodyExtractors.toDataBuffers()))

instead.

  • looks promising and simple, this is probably the proper answer to handle large requests. I'll try this one out if I have the time. – Bk Santiago Oct 15 '19 at 2:47
  • I had the same requirement and this solution worked great! – A Bit of Help Oct 23 '19 at 1:35
  • I should add that I do agree with @abhijit-sarkar's earlier comment that WebClient is not the best tool for this job. Although it can be done (as I have demonstrated), it is not the most efficient way of doing this. If all you need is an InputStream, you are better off using a synchronous client such as java.net.http.HttpClient. If you are stuck with WebClient, then I believe my solution is the best option. – user1585916 Oct 24 '19 at 4:08
2

Here comes another variant from other answers. And it's still not memory-friendly.

static Mono<InputStream> asStream(WebClient.ResponseSpec response) {
    return response.bodyToFlux(DataBuffer.class)
        .map(b -> b.asInputStream(true))
        .reduce(SequenceInputStream::new);
}

static void doSome(WebClient.ResponseSpec response) {
    asStream(response)
        .doOnNext(stream -> {
            // do some with stream
        })
        .block();
}
  • Super easy when dealing with small files. – Jeremy Dec 1 '19 at 17:07
0

You can use pipes.

static <R> Mono<R> pipeAndApply(
        final Publisher<DataBuffer> source, final Executor executor,
        final Function<? super ReadableByteChannel, ? extends R> function) {
    return using(Pipe::open,
                 p -> {
                     executor.execute(() -> write(source, p.sink())
                             .doFinally(s -> {
                                 try {
                                     p.sink().close();
                                 } catch (final IOException ioe) {
                                     log.error("failed to close pipe.sink", ioe);
                                     throw new RuntimeException(ioe);
                                 }
                             })
                             .subscribe(releaseConsumer()));
                     return just(function.apply(p.source()));
                 },
                 p -> {
                     try {
                         p.source().close();
                     } catch (final IOException ioe) {
                         log.error("failed to close pipe.source", ioe);
                         throw new RuntimeException(ioe);
                     }
                 });
}

Or using CompletableFuture,

static <R> Mono<R> pipeAndApply(
        final Publisher<DataBuffer> source,
        final Function<? super ReadableByteChannel, ? extends R> function) {
    return using(Pipe::open,
                 p -> fromFuture(supplyAsync(() -> function.apply(p.source())))
                         .doFirst(() -> write(source, p.sink())
                                 .doFinally(s -> {
                                     try {
                                         p.sink().close();
                                     } catch (final IOException ioe) {
                                         log.error("failed to close pipe.sink", ioe);
                                         throw new RuntimeException(ioe);
                                     }
                                 })
                                 .subscribe(releaseConsumer())),
                 p -> {
                     try {
                         p.source().close();
                     } catch (final IOException ioe) {
                         log.error("failed to close pipe.source", ioe);
                         throw new RuntimeException(ioe);
                     }
                 });
}
-1

Reconstructing the InputStream defeats the purpose of using WebClient in the first place because nothing will be emitted until the collect operation completes. For a large stream, that can be a very long time. The reactive model doesn't deal with individual bytes, but blocks of bytes (like Spring DataBuffer). See my answer here for a more elegant solution: https://stackoverflow.com/a/48054615/839733

  • 8
    You link to another answer, which in turn links to another answer, whose current score is -2. Would you mind removing the link and instead explaining everything in this answer? Thanks! – Nicolas Raoul Feb 12 '19 at 2:20
  • 1
    @NicolasRaoul Feel free to make an edit if you think that improves the answer. I’m not really here about a popularity contest, so I don’t care about downvoters. – Abhijit Sarkar Feb 12 '19 at 2:39

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