58

I'm trying to create an abstract class that defines a property with a getter. I want to leave it up to derived classes to decide if they want to implement a setter for the property or not. Is this possible?

What I have so far:

public abstract class AbstractClass {
    public abstract string Value { get; }
    public void DoSomething() {
        Console.WriteLine(Value);
    }
}

public class ConcreteClass1 : AbstractClass {
    public override string Value { get; set; }
}

public class ConcreteClass2 : AbstractClass {
    private string _value;
    public override string Value {
        get { return _value; }
    }
    public string Value {
        set { _value = value; }
    }
}

public class ConcreteClass3 : AbstractClass {
    private string _value;
    public override string Value {
        get { return _value; }
    }
    public void set_Value(string value) {
        _value = value;
    }
}

In ConcreteClass1, I get an error on the set. It can't override set_Value because no overridable set accessor exists in AbstractClass.

In ConcreteClass2, I get an error on both Value's because a member with the same name is already declared.

ConcreteClass3 doesn't give an error, but even though Value's set accessor would be compiled into set_Value, it doesn't work the other way around. Defining a set_Value does not mean that Value gets a set accessor. So I can't assign a value to a ConcreteClass3.Value property. I can use ConcreteClass3.set_Value("value"), but that's not what I'm trying to achieve here.

Is it possible to have the abstract class demand a public getter, while allowing an optional setter to be defined in a derived class?

In case you'r wondering, this is just a theoretical question. I don't have a real situation where something like this is needed. But I can imagine an abstract class that doesn't care how a property gets set, but that does need to be able to get the property.

0

4 Answers 4

44

Unfortunately, you can't do exactly what you want. You can do this with interfaces though:

public interface IInterface {
    string MyProperty { get; }
}

public class Class : IInterface {
    public string MyProperty { get; set; }
}

The way I would do it is to have a separate SetProperty method in the concrete classes:

public abstract class AbstractClass {
    public abstract string Value { get; }
}

public class ConcreteClass : AbstractClass {

    private string m_Value;
    public override string Value {
        get { return m_Value; }
    }

    public void SetValue(string value) {
        m_Value = value;
    }
}
5
  • Using the interface, I can't implement the DoSomething method in my base class (there is no base class, just an interface). Using SetValue is the same as the set_Value in my ConcreteClass3. But if that's the way to go, naming it SetValue is probably better than set_Value.
    – comecme
    Jan 10, 2011 at 11:34
  • The reason set_Value isn't linked to the property is there's an explicit PropertyDef definition in the assembly that links the get_ and set_ methods; simply naming a method set_ doesn't link it to a property. There's no way to do exactly what you want in C#; you will have to compromise.
    – thecoop
    Jan 10, 2011 at 11:41
  • 1
    You can implement DoSomething as an extension method on IInterface. See my edit.
    – piedar
    Jul 12, 2013 at 14:32
  • Does this difference in the way derived properties work between abstract classes and interfaces stem from the Common Language Specification or is it implementation specific?
    – Fredrick
    Aug 15, 2013 at 13:47
  • Although highly voted this solution is completely useless if the only reason you need a set is to make it work with a property grid which doesn't understand methods. Jun 2, 2021 at 15:43
7

Found a solution: How to override a getter-only property with a setter in C#?

public abstract class A
{
    public abstract int X { get; }
}
public class B : A
{
    public override int X { get { return 0; } }
}
/*public class C : B  //won't compile: can't override with setter
{
    private int _x;
    public override int X { get { return _x; } set { _x = value; } }
}*/
public abstract class C : B  //abstract intermediate layer
{
    public sealed override int X { get { return this.XGetter; }  }
    protected abstract int XGetter { get; }
}
public class D : C  //does same thing, but will compile
{
    private int _x;
    protected sealed override int XGetter { get { return this.X; } }
    public new virtual int X { get { return this._x; } set { this._x = value; } }
}

D is now equivalent to a class inheriting from B while also being able to override in a setter.

1
  • 4
    While it seems to work technically it does look a bit over-complicated compared to simplicity of the accepted answer. Can't imagine convincing my team to use it just to have some properties settable for testing purpose :) But have an up vote for the effort anyway.
    – Sevenate
    Nov 18, 2020 at 2:51
2

You can just use protected access modifier instead. Because of inheritance you are not allowed to use private. It looks like so:

public abstract class A
{
    public abstract int prop { get; protected set; }
}

public abstract class B : A
{
    public override int prop { get; protected set; }
}
4
  • I think you left out the half part of the answer, where the class can set a value to prop. Sep 8, 2020 at 22:30
  • How would the derived class (B) be able to implement a public setter for prop?
    – comecme
    Sep 11, 2020 at 6:00
  • @comecme, just leave it like public int prop { get; set; } Sep 14, 2020 at 19:48
  • 1
    If class A has {get; protected set;}, and I create class B with an public override int prop {get; protected set;} it does not compile. I can't override the property with a protected setter by one with a public setter.
    – comecme
    Sep 24, 2020 at 15:17
0

Not very elegant, but it's the closest you can get without doing something like you have in concreteclass3

public class Concrete : AbstractClass
{
    public new void DoSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Value);
    }
}

public abstract class AbstractClass
{
    protected AbstractClass()
    {
        try
        {
            var value = Value;
        }
        catch (NotImplementedException)
        {
            throw new Exception("Value's getter must be overriden in base class");
        }
    }
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Value);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Must be override in subclass
    /// </summary>
    public string Value { get { throw new NotImplementedException(); } }
}
1
  • I don't see why you define a new DoSomething in the concrete class. Also, you'r solution will throw an exception at runtime, at compile time the absence of a Value implementation won't be noticed at all.
    – comecme
    Jan 10, 2011 at 13:41

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