3

I am trying to use base64 but the script doesn't run successfully in Ubuntu machine

MYCOMMAND=$(base64  commands.sh)

So in Ubuntu , I have to use

MYCOMMAND=$(base64 -w0 commands.sh)

unfortunately this option is not there in Mac. How can i write a single script which runs both in Mac and Ubuntu

  • Maybe use a PHP one-liner which calls base64_encode() on its argument. – Mark Setchell Sep 28 '17 at 8:02
19

Yes, the default macOS base64 implementation doesn't have the -w flag. What does that flag do?

-w, --wrap=COLS

Wrap encoded lines after COLS character (default 76). Use 0 to disable line wrapping.

And here's the macOS man page for base64:

-b count
--break=count

Insert line breaks every count characters. Default is 0, which generates an unbroken stream.

So, the flag is called -b in macOS, and it already defaults to 0, which means base64 in macOS has the same behaviour as base64 -w0 on Linux. You'll have to detect which platform you run on to use the appropriate variation of the command. See here: Detect the OS from a Bash script; the platform name you're looking for for macOS is "Darwin".

2

In Mac's it's -b, and the default is already 0.

$ man base64
...
OPTIONS
     The following options are available:
     -b count
     --break=count        Insert line breaks every count characters. Default is 0, which generates an unbroken stream.
...

One way to have the script work for both is checking for errors:

MYCOMMAND=$(base64 -w0 commands.sh)
if [ $? -ne 0 ]; then
  MYCOMMAND=$(base64 commands.sh)
fi

You can also run an explicit test, e.g

echo | base64 -w0 > /dev/null 2>&1
if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
  # GNU coreutils base64, '-w' supported
  MYCOMMAND=$(base64 -w0 commands.sh)
else
  # Openssl base64, no wrapping by default
  MYCOMMAND=$(base64 commands.sh)
fi

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.