2

I have a develop branch and one feature branch, let's call it feature/A. When someone commites on remote develop, I am pulling it then I go to feature/A and rebasing it onto develop. Now I want to create new branch called feature/B and "inherit" it from feature/A and do some development (I need feature/A's code in feature/B), but I wonder what will happen when I will rebase my feature/A onto develop.

    dev
     |
1----4
 \
  \---2--------3
      |        |
     f/A      f/B

then I will commit on feature/A again

    dev
     |
1----4
 \
  \---2--------3
       \        |
        |      f/B
        5
       f/A

when I will rebase feature/A onto develop I will have

    dev      f/A
     |        |
1----4---2'---5'
 \
  \---2--------3
      /        |
     /        f/B
    5 (commit without any assiciated branch that git will remove as trash after several days)

Now I have to rebase feature/B onto feature/A right ? Is it possible that after that rebase commit 2 and 3 will override commit 2' and commit 5' and in my feature/B I will have old code again ?

Don't forget that I need commit 5 changes in my feature/B

  • I am worry that during rebase commit 2 will override commit 2' and I will have old codes. Can it happen ? – Aram810 Sep 28 '17 at 13:02
  • I need feature/A's code in featude/B but I can't merge feature/A with develop. in other words my feature/A always has dependency from feature/A – Aram810 Sep 28 '17 at 13:06
  • 1
    perform interactive rebase, and skip commit 2, or resolve a conflict in a way that does not override commit 2' – Piotr Skotnicki Sep 28 '17 at 13:15
  • I have updated my question, please read it again – Aram810 Sep 28 '17 at 13:24
  • 1
    You can also "cherry-pick" a single commit (commit 3 in this case) – Piotr Skotnicki Sep 28 '17 at 13:51
1

Well... rebase is a pretty flexible command. It can do a lot of things, so the real question is how to tell it to do exactly what you mean.

So it seems the point of concern is when you have

1 -- 4 <--(dev)
 \    \
  \    2' -- 5' <--(A)
   \
    2 -- 3 <--(B)

how to rebase B onto A. (The additional information you gave about how you got to this point doesn't really matter; we can just focus on the current commit graph. The dangling commit 5 also doesn't really matter here.)

You ask about if 2 could end up overriding 2' in some way... I don't see a concern there. If the branch you're rebasing is B, A and its history will be unaffected.

A minor concern is that 2 is in the history of B but not the history of A. This shouldn't be a problem, because we'd expect 2 to apply the same textual changes as 2' - a condition rebase will detect. But if there were conflict resolutions when rebasing A - or other, more obscure possibilities I suppose - the patch comparison might get messed up.

What that means is, you should be able to just say

git rebase A B

Commits 2 and 3 would be identified as the source commits, but 2 would hopefully be found as a duplicate of 2' and discarded. 3' would be created to apply the changes from 3 (relative to 2) on top of 5, yielding

1 -- 4 <--(dev)
      \
       2' -- 5' <--(A)
              \
               3' <--(B)

If that fails then you'll probably see conflicts when git tries to replay 2. At that point you would abort the rebase.

(I can't see how this would happen, but if the rebase successfully completes and yet you find that it incorrectly re-copied changes from 2, then you can still back it out; use

git checkout B
git reset --hard B@{1}

to undo the rebase.)

If you had to either abort the rebase or undo it, then "plan B" would be

git rebase --onto A 2 B

where 2 is an expression that refers to commit 2 (such as its SHA ID, or B^ in the given example, etc.). This will ensure that only 3 is considered as a candidate commit to rewrite (because 2 is the upstream) but will still perform the replay onto 5.

  • don't know why this wasn't accepted - had a similar issue and this worked great – Philip Pittle Aug 23 '18 at 23:57

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