13

An issue I keep facing is one where the compiler complains about an unused variable, even though the variable is used, but it's only used inside a parameter pack expansion that happens to be empty for a specific instantiation. For example:

template <std::size_t... I>
auto func1(std::index_sequence<I...>)
{
  auto var = get_tuple();
  return func2(std::get<I>(var)...);
}

auto a = func1(std::make_index_sequence<0>());

See live example (try changing the tuple at line 4, by adding an int inside <> to see the warning go away). I know I could add a (void)var; line to make the warning go away, but it feels dirty to me, especially when the function is actually just a single line. I also don't want to disable this warning globally, because it does provide insight sometimes.

A similar manifestation of this issue is when the variable is used in a lambda capture. In this case, gcc spits no warning, while clang complains (I think gcc never implemented a warning about unused lambda captures):

template <std::size_t... I>
auto func1(std::index_sequence<I...>)
{
  auto var = get_tuple();
  auto my_lambda = [var](){
    return func2(std::get<I>(var)...);
  };
  return my_lambda();
}

auto a = func1(std::make_index_sequence<0>());

clang example

7
  • 2
    Use clang and file a bug report to gcc :P
    – Rakete1111
    Sep 28, 2017 at 15:33
  • 2
    You can still pragma push/pop around the function to disable warning. but static_cast<void>(var); seems better workaround.
    – Jarod42
    Sep 28, 2017 at 15:36
  • How about return func2(std::get<I>(get_tuple())...);?
    – nwp
    Sep 28, 2017 at 15:37
  • @Jarod42 It might not be obvious this is to silence a warning instead of a botched up job of forcing a read from var or some other weirdness
    – Passer By
    Sep 28, 2017 at 15:38
  • 2
    @nwp Isn't that going to execute get_tuple multiple times, which may or may not always return the same thing? Also maybe be a performance problem if it does a lot of stuff.
    – Rakete1111
    Sep 28, 2017 at 15:40

5 Answers 5

7

If you can use C++17, the [[maybe_unused]] attribute is the clearest solution IMO:

[[maybe_unused]]
auto tuple = get_tuple();
2
5

var is indeed not use with empty pack. Is it intended ? compiler can only guess.

Whereas clang consider than empty pack is a usage, gcc chooses the contrary.

You can silent the warning in different ways as:

  • attribute [[maybe_unused]] (C++17)
  • casting to void (static_cast<void>(arg))
  • or similar (template <typename T> void unused_var(T&&){} and then unused_var(var)).
  • creating overloads:

    auto func1(std::index_sequence<>)
    {
      return func2();
    }
    
    template <std::size_t... I>
    auto func1(std::index_sequence<I...>)
    {
      auto var = get_tuple();
      return func2(std::get<I>(var)...);
    }
    

    or in C++17

    template <std::size_t... I>
    auto func1(std::index_sequence<I...>)
    {
        if constexpr (sizeof ...(I) == 0) {
            return func2();
        } else {
            auto var = get_tuple();
            return func2(std::get<I>(var)...);
        }
    }
    
2
  • 3
    A c-style cast to void is one of the few cases where C-style casts can provably not do bad behavior. In addition, unused_var could accidentally force ODR-existence of a variable if used without care. Sep 28, 2017 at 16:57
  • [[maybe_unused]] is not supported by GCC prior to 7
    – Kokos
    Mar 18, 2021 at 21:58
3

This seems to be a compiler bug in GCC. The easiest workaround is to mark var with [[gnu::unused]]:

template <std::size_t... I>
auto func1(std::index_sequence<I...>)
{
  auto var [[gnu::unused]] = get_tuple();
  return func2(std::get<I>(var)...);
}

If you are force to use compilers that don't recognize [[gnu::unused]], you can fake use the variable with a static_cast<void>:

template <std::size_t... I>
auto func1(std::index_sequence<I...>)
{
  auto var = get_tuple();
  static_cast<void>(var);
  return func2(std::get<I>(var)...);
}
6
  • Will this wreck portability?
    – Passer By
    Sep 28, 2017 at 15:40
  • If an attribute is not recognized, the compiler ignores it. And both GCC and LLVM support [[gnu::unused]]. Sep 28, 2017 at 15:42
  • 3
    Wouldn't unrecognized attributes also spit out warnings? Like this
    – Passer By
    Sep 28, 2017 at 15:43
  • Depends on your compiler settings :-) Sep 28, 2017 at 15:47
  • For the second solution (the only one I know how to make it work for a lambda capture: godbolt.org/g/CrwNhM), isn't it preventing the optimizer from completely eliminating var from the compiler output?
    – dcmm88
    Sep 28, 2017 at 16:16
2

(void)var; suppressed unused warnings in every compiler I have used:

template <std::size_t... I>
auto func1(std::index_sequence<I...>)
{
  auto var = get_tuple();
  (void)var;
  return func2(std::get<I>(var)...);
}
auto a = func1(std::make_index_sequence<0>());

(void)variable; has zero run time effects.

-1

Maybe there are other problems but... according the code you linked in compiler explorer, your var is a std::tuple<>; that is a std::tuple with zero components.

If I'm not wrong, std::get<Num>(std::tuple<Ts..>) is defined only when Num is in [0,sizeof...(Ts)); in this case in [0, 0), that is an empty interval.

I suppose that your code (when var is defined as std::tuple<>) is ill formed. So I suppose that the warning is correct (because there isn't cases when var is used) but doesn't warn about the real problem.

It's different when var is defined as std::tuple<int>: var is correctly used when all I are equal to zero, so var is (potentially) used and, as you observed, the warning disappears.

11
  • 2
    But if var is empty, the code expands to nothing, no?
    – Rakete1111
    Sep 28, 2017 at 15:46
  • @Rakete1111 - I suppose you're right but (if I'm not wrong) var is never unused; when sizeof...(I) is zero and when is grater. So the warning message. When the OP transform var in a std::tuple<int>, the warning disappear because (as ever: if I'm not wrong) there are cases when var is correctly used: when (and only when) all I are zero.
    – max66
    Sep 28, 2017 at 15:53
  • Agreed, the code uses var, so the warning is wrong. Not sure I understand your last point.
    – Rakete1111
    Sep 28, 2017 at 16:01
  • @Rakete1111 - my last point is that if var is a std::tuple<> (warning case), var is never used (also when sizeof...(I) is greater than zero); when var is a std::tuple<int> (no warning case), var is (correctly!) used when all I are equal to zero. So (if I'm not wrong, as usual) the compiler is right (in both cases) but, in the first case, the real problem is another (a call to std::get<I>(var) when var is a std::tuple<> is wrong in any case).
    – max66
    Sep 28, 2017 at 16:06
  • @max66 Yes, the reason it complains about unused variables is that the parameter pack expansion is empty. So var isn't really used after expansion. But my whole point is that the warning is useless for me. Note that clang doesn't complain about the exact same code (though it complains in another case). Also, nothing in my code is UB. There is nothing wrong with std::get<I>(var) when var is a std::tuple<>, because it's part of parameter pack expansion expression that evaluates to nothing. So there is never a call such as std::get<??>(var) being made.
    – dcmm88
    Sep 28, 2017 at 16:22

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