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In a function definition, if a channel is an argument without a direction, does it have to send or receive something?

func makeRequest(url string, ch chan<- string, results chan<- string) {
    start := time.Now()

    resp, err := http.Get(url)
    defer resp.Body.Close()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Printf("%v", err)
    }

    resp, err = http.Post(url, "text/plain", bytes.NewBuffer([]byte("Hey")))
    defer resp.Body.Close()

    secs := time.Since(start).Seconds()

    if err != nil {
        fmt.Printf("%v", err)
    }
    // Cannot move past this.
    ch <- fmt.Sprintf("%f", secs) 
    results <- <- ch
}

func MakeRequestHelper(url string, ch chan string, results chan string, iterations int) {
    for i := 0; i < iterations; i++ {
        makeRequest(url, ch, results)
    }
    for i := 0; i < iterations; i++ {
        fmt.Println(<-ch)
    }
}

func main() {
    args := os.Args[1:]
    threadString := args[0]
    iterationString := args[1]
    url := args[2]
    threads, err := strconv.Atoi(threadString)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Printf("%v", err)
    }
    iterations, err := strconv.Atoi(iterationString)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Printf("%v", err)
    }

    channels := make([]chan string, 100)
    for i := range channels {
        channels[i] = make(chan string)
    }

    // results aggregate all the things received by channels in all goroutines
    results := make(chan string, iterations*threads)

    for i := 0; i < threads; i++ {
        go MakeRequestHelper(url, channels[i], results, iterations)

    }

    resultSlice := make([]string, threads*iterations)
    for i := 0; i < threads*iterations; i++ {
        resultSlice[i] = <-results
    }
}

In the above code,

ch <- or <-results

seems to be blocking every goroutine that executes makeRequest.

I am new to concurrency model of Go. I understand that sending to and receiving from a channel blocks but find it difficult what is blocking what in this code.

2
  • gobyexample.com/channels it has more examples for channels Sep 29, 2017 at 3:50
  • Only execute defer resp.Body.Close() if the error is nil. Otherwise resp is nil and your program will panic.
    – Peter
    Sep 29, 2017 at 11:35

2 Answers 2

1

I'm not really sure that you are doing... It seems really convoluted. I suggest you read up on how to use channels.

https://tour.golang.org/concurrency/2

That being said you have so much going on in your code that it was much easier to just gut it to something a bit simpler. (It can be simplified further). I left comments to understand the code.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "io/ioutil"
    "log"
    "net/http"
    "sync"
    "time"
)

// using structs is a nice way to organize your code
type Worker struct {
    wg        sync.WaitGroup
    semaphore chan struct{}
    result    chan Result
    client    http.Client
}

// group returns so that you don't have to send to many channels
type Result struct {
    duration float64
    results  string
}

// closing your channels will stop the for loop in main
func (w *Worker) Close() {
    close(w.semaphore)
    close(w.result)
}

func (w *Worker) MakeRequest(url string) {
    // a semaphore is a simple way to rate limit the amount of goroutines running at any single point of time
    // google them, Go uses them often
    w.semaphore <- struct{}{}
    defer func() {
        w.wg.Done()
        <-w.semaphore
    }()

    start := time.Now()

    resp, err := w.client.Get(url)
    if err != nil {
        log.Println("error", err)
        return
    }
    defer resp.Body.Close()

    // don't have any examples where I need to also POST anything but the point should be made
    // resp, err = http.Post(url, "text/plain", bytes.NewBuffer([]byte("Hey")))
    // if err != nil {
    // log.Println("error", err)
    // return
    // }
    // defer resp.Body.Close()

    secs := time.Since(start).Seconds()

    b, err := ioutil.ReadAll(resp.Body)
    if err != nil {
        log.Println("error", err)
        return
    }
    w.result <- Result{duration: secs, results: string(b)}
}

func main() {
    urls := []string{"https://facebook.com/", "https://twitter.com/", "https://google.com/", "https://youtube.com/", "https://linkedin.com/", "https://wordpress.org/",
        "https://instagram.com/", "https://pinterest.com/", "https://wikipedia.org/", "https://wordpress.com/", "https://blogspot.com/", "https://apple.com/",
    }

    workerNumber := 5
    worker := Worker{
        semaphore: make(chan struct{}, workerNumber),
        result:    make(chan Result),
        client:    http.Client{Timeout: 5 * time.Second},
    }

    // use sync groups to allow your code to wait for
    // all your goroutines to finish
    for _, url := range urls {
        worker.wg.Add(1)
        go worker.MakeRequest(url)
    }

    // by declaring wait and close as a seperate goroutine
    // I can get to the for loop below and iterate on the results
    // in a non blocking fashion
    go func() {
        worker.wg.Wait()
        worker.Close()
    }()

    // do something with the results channel
    for res := range worker.result {
        fmt.Printf("Request took %2.f seconds.\nResults: %s\n\n", res.duration, res.results)
    }
}
6
  • 1
    Thank you very much for your reply and spending time to write a very clean code! I will try to learn more about semaphores and concurrency. I skimmed through Donovan and Kernighan book chapter on goroutines, Effective Go, Go by example, go concurrency patterns talk by Rob Pike, and Go tour but I guess it will take some more practice to understand these concepts. I was trying to simulate what happens to my toy server when a large number of users simultaneously send GET and POST requests. All this is a part of a homework assignment and I am the only one using Go.
    – user2775683
    Sep 29, 2017 at 5:49
  • Those are all great resources, you'll be learning Go in no time. Sep 29, 2017 at 12:02
  • Also there are a few modifications that can still be made above. I'd write few wrapper methods for the waitgroup stuff. Eg. worker.wg.Add(1) is a bit gross, worker.Add(1) would be better. I didn't do much about logging, but something needs to be done. I suggest you use something like this for logging. github.com/sirupsen/logrus also in goroutines use logs over fmt. The log package is safe for concurrent use. Consider using time.Duration over floats golang.org/pkg/time/#Duration and flag over os.Args golang.org/pkg/flag Sep 29, 2017 at 12:08
  • Also if you're testing a server written in Go the above code won't really load it to much. The semaphore stops that, also you'd want an infinite loop that either breaks on some timeout or signal. (both are defined channels in Go). You can also bench your server with siege joedog.org/siege-home or something like this github.com/btfak/sniper.. there are other like packages in the wild. Sep 29, 2017 at 12:19
  • would w.result <- Result{duration: secs, results: string(b)} not block? will it not cause all go-routines to get stuck at that point and thereby never calling wg.done() ?
    – Edwin O.
    Feb 19, 2018 at 6:30
1

The channels in channels are nil (no make is executed; you make the slice but not the channels), so any send or receive will block. I'm not sure exactly what you're trying to do here, but that's the basic problem.

See https://golang.org/doc/effective_go.html#channels for an explanation of how channels work.

2
  • Thanks for your reply! Even after I call a make on every channel in channels slice, the ch <- or <-results still seems to be blocking. I am trying to create a specified number of goroutines. Each goroutine calls GET and POST in on a url for specified number of times and records the time taken to complete each iteration for each goroutine.
    – user2775683
    Sep 29, 2017 at 3:01
  • 1
    If the channels are unbuffered, any send or receive will block until the corresponding receive or send has executed, so those operations have to be in different goroutines. You have one goroutine trying to send and then trying to receive on a channel. Sep 29, 2017 at 3:27

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