77

Is it possible to have Entity Framework (I am using the Code First Approach with CTP5 currently) store all DateTime values as UTC in the database?

Or is there maybe a way to specify it in the mapping, for example in this one for the last_login column:

modelBuilder.Entity<User>().Property(x => x.Id).HasColumnName("id");
modelBuilder.Entity<User>().Property(x => x.IsAdmin).HasColumnName("admin");
modelBuilder.Entity<User>().Property(x => x.IsEnabled).HasColumnName("enabled");
modelBuilder.Entity<User>().Property(x => x.PasswordHash).HasColumnName("password_hash");
modelBuilder.Entity<User>().Property(x => x.LastLogin).HasColumnName("last_login");

10 Answers 10

129

Here is one approach you might consider:

First, define this following attribute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
public class DateTimeKindAttribute : Attribute
{
    private readonly DateTimeKind _kind;

    public DateTimeKindAttribute(DateTimeKind kind)
    {
        _kind = kind;
    }

    public DateTimeKind Kind
    {
        get { return _kind; }
    }

    public static void Apply(object entity)
    {
        if (entity == null)
            return;

        var properties = entity.GetType().GetProperties()
            .Where(x => x.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime) || x.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime?));

        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            var attr = property.GetCustomAttribute<DateTimeKindAttribute>();
            if (attr == null)
                continue;

            var dt = property.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime?)
                ? (DateTime?) property.GetValue(entity)
                : (DateTime) property.GetValue(entity);

            if (dt == null)
                continue;

            property.SetValue(entity, DateTime.SpecifyKind(dt.Value, attr.Kind));
        }
    }
}

Now hook that attribute up to your EF context:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Foo> Foos { get; set; }

    public MyContext()
    {
        ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.ObjectMaterialized +=
            (sender, e) => DateTimeKindAttribute.Apply(e.Entity);
    }
}

Now on any DateTime or DateTime? properties, you can apply this attribute:

public class Foo
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [DateTimeKind(DateTimeKind.Utc)]
    public DateTime Bar { get; set; }
}

With this in place, whenever Entity Framework loads an entity from the database, it will set the DateTimeKind that you specify, such as UTC.

Note that this doesn't do anything when saving. You'll still have to have the value properly converted to UTC before you try to save it. But it does allow you to set the kind when retrieving, which allows it to be serialized as UTC, or converted to other time zones with TimeZoneInfo.

  • 7
    If you can't get this working, you're probably missing one of these usings: using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema; using System.Linq; using System.Reflection; – Saustrup Jan 6 '14 at 11:07
  • 4
    @Saustrup - You'll find most examples on S.O. will omit usings for brevity, unless they are directly relevant to the question. But thanks. – Matt Johnson Jan 6 '14 at 17:55
  • 3
    @MattJohnson without @Saustrup's using statements, you get some unhelpful compile errors such as 'System.Array' does not contain a definition for 'Where' – Jacob Eggers May 30 '14 at 19:24
  • 7
    As @SilverSideDown said, this only works with .NET 4.5. I've created some extensions to make it compatible with .NET 4.0 at gist.github.com/munr/3544bd7fab6615290561. Another thing to note is that this won't work with projections, only fully loaded entities. – Mun Jul 1 '14 at 19:37
  • 4
    Any suggestions on getting this going with projections? – Jafin Apr 27 '15 at 5:37
25

I really like Matt Johnson's approach, but in my model ALL of my DateTime members are UTC and I don't want to have to decorate all of them with an attribute. So I generalized Matt's approach to allow the event handler to apply a default Kind value unless a member is explicitly decorated with the attribute.

The constructor for the ApplicationDbContext class includes this code:

/// <summary> Constructor: Initializes a new ApplicationDbContext instance. </summary>
public ApplicationDbContext()
        : base(MyApp.ConnectionString, throwIfV1Schema: false)
{
    // Set the Kind property on DateTime variables retrieved from the database
    ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.ObjectMaterialized +=
      (sender, e) => DateTimeKindAttribute.Apply(e.Entity, DateTimeKind.Utc);
}

DateTimeKindAttribute looks like this:

/// <summary> Sets the DateTime.Kind value on DateTime and DateTime? members retrieved by Entity Framework. Sets Kind to DateTimeKind.Utc by default. </summary>
[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
public class DateTimeKindAttribute : Attribute
{
    /// <summary> The DateTime.Kind value to set into the returned value. </summary>
    public readonly DateTimeKind Kind;

    /// <summary> Specifies the DateTime.Kind value to set on the returned DateTime value. </summary>
    /// <param name="kind"> The DateTime.Kind value to set on the returned DateTime value. </param>
    public DateTimeKindAttribute(DateTimeKind kind)
    {
        Kind = kind;
    }

    /// <summary> Event handler to connect to the ObjectContext.ObjectMaterialized event. </summary>
    /// <param name="entity"> The entity (POCO class) being materialized. </param>
    /// <param name="defaultKind"> [Optional] The Kind property to set on all DateTime objects by default. </param>
    public static void Apply(object entity, DateTimeKind? defaultKind = null)
    {
        if (entity == null) return;

        // Get the PropertyInfos for all of the DateTime and DateTime? properties on the entity
        var properties = entity.GetType().GetProperties()
            .Where(x => x.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime) || x.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime?));

        // For each DateTime or DateTime? property on the entity...
        foreach (var propInfo in properties) {
            // Initialization
            var kind = defaultKind;

            // Get the kind value from the [DateTimekind] attribute if it's present
            var kindAttr = propInfo.GetCustomAttribute<DateTimeKindAttribute>();
            if (kindAttr != null) kind = kindAttr.Kind;

            // Set the Kind property
            if (kind != null) {
                var dt = (propInfo.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime?))
                    ? (DateTime?)propInfo.GetValue(entity)
                    : (DateTime)propInfo.GetValue(entity);

                if (dt != null) propInfo.SetValue(entity, DateTime.SpecifyKind(dt.Value, kind.Value));
            }
        }
    }
}
  • This is very useful extension to the accepted answer! – Learner Apr 13 '17 at 12:15
  • Perhaps I'm missing something, but how does this default to DateTimeKind.Utc as opposed to DateTimeKind.Unspecified? – Rhonage Aug 8 '17 at 4:06
  • @Rhonage Sorry about that. The default is set up in the ApplicationDbContext constructor. I updated the answer to include that. – Bob.at.Indigo.Health Aug 10 '17 at 0:19
  • @Bob.at.AIPsychLab Thanks mate, much clearer now. Was trying to figure out if there was some weight Reflection going on - but nope, dead simple! – Rhonage Aug 18 '17 at 3:11
  • This fails if a model has a DateTIme attribute without a (public) setter method. Edit suggested. See also stackoverflow.com/a/3762475/2279059 – Florian Winter Mar 12 '18 at 13:12
6

I believe I've found a solution that doesn't require any custom UTC checking or DateTime manipulation.

Basically you need to change your EF entities to use DateTimeOffset (NOT DateTime) datatype. This will store the time zone with the date value in the database (SQL Server 2015 in my case).

When EF Core requests the data from the DB it will receive the timezone info as well. When you pass this data to a web application (Angular2 in my case) the date is automatically converted to the local timezone of the browser which is what I expect.

And when it is passed back to my server it is converted to UTC again automatically, also as expected.

  • 4
    DateTimeOffset does not store the time zone, contrary to common perception. It stores an offset from UTC that the value represents. The offset cannot be mapped in reverse to determine the actual time zone the offset was created from, thereby making the datatype nearly useless. – Suncat2000 Nov 28 '17 at 16:55
  • No, but it can be used to store a DateTime correctly: medium.com/@ojb500/in-praise-of-datetimeoffset-e0711f991cba – Carl Jun 21 '18 at 13:01
  • Only UTC doesn't need a location, because it is everywhere the same. If you use something else than UTC you also need the location, else the information of time is useless, also at using datetimeoffset. – Horitsu Oct 17 '18 at 5:05
5

I'm researching this right now, and most of these answers aren't exactly great. From what I can see, there's no way to tell EF6 that the dates coming out of the database are in UTC format. If that is the case, the simplest way to make sure your model's DateTime properties are in UTC would be to verify and convert in the setter.

Here's some c# like pseudocode which describes the algorithm

public DateTime MyUtcDateTime 
{    
    get 
    {        
        return _myUtcDateTime;        
    }
    set
    {   
        if(value.Kind == DateTimeKind.Utc)      
            _myUtcDateTime = value;            
        else if (value.Kind == DateTimeKind.Local)         
            _myUtcDateTime = value.ToUniversalTime();
        else 
            _myUtcDateTime = DateTime.SpecifyKind(value, DateTimeKind.Utc);        
    }    
}

The first two branches are obvious. The last holds the secret sauce.

When EF6 creates a model from data loaded from the database, DateTimes are DateTimeKind.Unspecified. If you know your dates are all UTC in the db, then the last branch will work great for you.

DateTime.Now is always DateTimeKind.Local, so the above algorithm works fine for dates generated in code. Most of the time.

You have to be cautious, however, as there are other ways DateTimeKind.Unspecified can sneak into your code. For example, you might deserialize your models from JSON data, and your deserializer flavor defaults to this kind. It's up to you to guard against localized dates marked DateTimeKind.Unknown from getting to that setter from anybody but EF.

  • 2
    As I found out after several years of wrestling with this issue, if you are assigning or selecting DateTime fields into other structures, for example a data transfer object, EF ignores both getter and setter methods. In these cases, you still have to change Kind to DateTimeKind.Utc after your results are generated. Example: from o in myContext.Records select new DTO() { BrokenTimestamp = o.BbTimestamp }; sets all Kind to DateTimeKind.Unspecified. – Suncat2000 Nov 28 '17 at 16:39
5

This answer works with Entity Framework 6

The accepted answer does not work for Projected or Anonymous object. Performance could be a problem too.

To achieve this, we need to use a DbCommandInterceptor, an object provided by EntityFramework.

Create Interceptor:

public class UtcInterceptor : DbCommandInterceptor
{
    public override void ReaderExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
    {
        base.ReaderExecuted(command, interceptionContext);

        if (interceptionContext?.Result != null && !(interceptionContext.Result is UtcDbDataReader))
        {
            interceptionContext.Result = new UtcDbDataReader(interceptionContext.Result);
        }
    }
}

interceptionContext.Result is DbDataReader, which we replace by ours

public class UtcDbDataReader : DbDataReader
{
    private readonly DbDataReader source;

    public UtcDbDataReader(DbDataReader source)
    {
        this.source = source;
    }

    public override DateTime GetDateTime(int ordinal)
    {
        return DateTime.SpecifyKind(source.GetDateTime(ordinal), DateTimeKind.Utc);
    }        

    // you need to fill all overrides. Just call the same method on source in all cases

    public new void Dispose()
    {
        source.Dispose();
    }

    public new IDataReader GetData(int ordinal)
    {
        return source.GetData(ordinal);
    }
}

Register the interceptor in your DbConfiguration

internal class MyDbConfiguration : DbConfiguration
{
    protected internal MyDbConfiguration ()
    {           
        AddInterceptor(new UtcInterceptor());
    }
}

Finally, register the configuration for on your DbContext

[DbConfigurationType(typeof(MyDbConfiguration ))]
internal class MyDbContext : DbContext
{
    // ...
}

That's it. Cheers.

For simplicity, here is the entire implementation of DbReader:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Data;
using System.Data.Common;
using System.IO;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace MyNameSpace
{
    /// <inheritdoc />
    [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Design", "CA1010:CollectionsShouldImplementGenericInterface")]
    [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Naming", "CA1710:IdentifiersShouldHaveCorrectSuffix")]
    public class UtcDbDataReader : DbDataReader
    {
        private readonly DbDataReader source;

        public UtcDbDataReader(DbDataReader source)
        {
            this.source = source;
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override int VisibleFieldCount => source.VisibleFieldCount;

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override int Depth => source.Depth;

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override int FieldCount => source.FieldCount;

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override bool HasRows => source.HasRows;

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override bool IsClosed => source.IsClosed;

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override int RecordsAffected => source.RecordsAffected;

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override object this[string name] => source[name];

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override object this[int ordinal] => source[ordinal];

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override bool GetBoolean(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetBoolean(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override byte GetByte(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetByte(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override long GetBytes(int ordinal, long dataOffset, byte[] buffer, int bufferOffset, int length)
        {
            return source.GetBytes(ordinal, dataOffset, buffer, bufferOffset, length);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override char GetChar(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetChar(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override long GetChars(int ordinal, long dataOffset, char[] buffer, int bufferOffset, int length)
        {
            return source.GetChars(ordinal, dataOffset, buffer, bufferOffset, length);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override string GetDataTypeName(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetDataTypeName(ordinal);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns datetime with Utc kind
        /// </summary>
        public override DateTime GetDateTime(int ordinal)
        {
            return DateTime.SpecifyKind(source.GetDateTime(ordinal), DateTimeKind.Utc);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override decimal GetDecimal(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetDecimal(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override double GetDouble(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetDouble(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
        {
            return source.GetEnumerator();
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override Type GetFieldType(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetFieldType(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override float GetFloat(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetFloat(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override Guid GetGuid(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetGuid(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override short GetInt16(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetInt16(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override int GetInt32(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetInt32(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override long GetInt64(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetInt64(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override string GetName(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetName(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override int GetOrdinal(string name)
        {
            return source.GetOrdinal(name);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override string GetString(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetString(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override object GetValue(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetValue(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override int GetValues(object[] values)
        {
            return source.GetValues(values);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override bool IsDBNull(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.IsDBNull(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override bool NextResult()
        {
            return source.NextResult();
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override bool Read()
        {
            return source.Read();
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override void Close()
        {
            source.Close();
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override T GetFieldValue<T>(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetFieldValue<T>(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override Task<T> GetFieldValueAsync<T>(int ordinal, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
        {
            return source.GetFieldValueAsync<T>(ordinal, cancellationToken);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override Type GetProviderSpecificFieldType(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetProviderSpecificFieldType(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override object GetProviderSpecificValue(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetProviderSpecificValue(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override int GetProviderSpecificValues(object[] values)
        {
            return source.GetProviderSpecificValues(values);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override DataTable GetSchemaTable()
        {
            return source.GetSchemaTable();
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override Stream GetStream(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetStream(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override TextReader GetTextReader(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetTextReader(ordinal);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override Task<bool> IsDBNullAsync(int ordinal, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
        {
            return source.IsDBNullAsync(ordinal, cancellationToken);
        }

        /// <inheritdoc />
        public override Task<bool> ReadAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
        {
            return source.ReadAsync(cancellationToken);
        }

        [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Design", "CA1063:ImplementIDisposableCorrectly")]
        [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Usage", "CA1816:CallGCSuppressFinalizeCorrectly")]
        public new void Dispose()
        {
            source.Dispose();
        }

        public new IDataReader GetData(int ordinal)
        {
            return source.GetData(ordinal);
        }
    }
}
  • So far this seems like the best answer. I tried the attribute variation first as it seemed less far reaching but my unit tests would fail with mocking as the constructor event tie-in doesn't seem to know about table mappings that occur in the OnModelCreating event. This one gets my vote! – The Senator Sep 3 '18 at 7:29
  • Why are you shadowing Dispose and GetData? – Stijn Sep 4 '18 at 6:39
  • This code should probably credit @IvanStoev: stackoverflow.com/a/40349051/90287 – Rami A. Nov 8 '18 at 23:01
4

There is no way to specify the DataTimeKind in the Entity Framework. You may decide to convert the date time values to utc before storing to db and always assume the data retrived from db as UTC. But the DateTime objects materalized during query will always be "Unspecified". You could also evalualte using DateTimeOffset object instead of DateTime.

4

If you are careful to properly pass in UTC dates when you set the values and all you care about is making sure the DateTimeKind is set properly when the entities are retrieved from the database, see my answer here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/9386364/279590

1

For those who need to achieve @MattJohnson solution with .net framework 4 like me, with reflection syntax/method limitation , it require a little bit modification as listed below:

     foreach (var property in properties)
        {     

            DateTimeKindAttribute attr  = (DateTimeKindAttribute) Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(property, typeof(DateTimeKindAttribute));

            if (attr == null)
                continue;

            var dt = property.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime?)
                ? (DateTime?)property.GetValue(entity,null)
                : (DateTime)property.GetValue(entity, null);

            if (dt == null)
                continue;

            //If the value is not null set the appropriate DateTimeKind;
            property.SetValue(entity, DateTime.SpecifyKind(dt.Value, attr.Kind) ,null);
        }  
0

Another approach would be to create an interface with the datetime properties, implement them on the partial entity classes. And then use the SavingChanges event to check if the object is of the interface type, set those datetime values to whatever you want. In fact, if these are createdon/modifiedon kind of dates, you can use that event to populate them.

0

In my case, I had only one table with UTC datetimes. Here's what I did:

public partial class MyEntity
{
    protected override void OnPropertyChanged(string property)
    {
        base.OnPropertyChanged(property);            

        // ensure that values coming from database are set as UTC
        // watch out for property name changes!
        switch (property)
        {
            case "TransferDeadlineUTC":
                if (TransferDeadlineUTC.Kind == DateTimeKind.Unspecified)
                    TransferDeadlineUTC = DateTime.SpecifyKind(TransferDeadlineUTC, DateTimeKind.Utc);
                break;
            case "ProcessingDeadlineUTC":
                if (ProcessingDeadlineUTC.Kind == DateTimeKind.Unspecified)
                    ProcessingDeadlineUTC = DateTime.SpecifyKind(ProcessingDeadlineUTC, DateTimeKind.Utc);
            default:
                break;
        }
    }
}

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