11

I need to write a python script that removes every word in a text file with non alphabetical characters, in order to test Zipf's law. For example:

[email protected] said: I've taken 2 reports to the boss

to

taken reports to the boss

How should I proceed?

1
  • 1
    Look like a job for regex.
    – Paco H.
    Sep 29, 2017 at 9:48

8 Answers 8

9

Using regular expressions to match only letters (and underscores), you can do this:

import re

s = "[email protected] said: I've taken 2 reports to the boss"
# s = open('text.txt').read()

tokens = s.strip().split()
clean_tokens = [t for t in tokens if re.match(r'[^\W\d]*$', t)]
# ['taken', 'reports', 'to', 'the', 'boss']
clean_s = ' '.join(clean_tokens)
# 'taken reports to the boss'
0
6

Try this:

sentence = "[email protected] said: I've taken 2 reports to the boss"
words = [word for word in sentence.split() if word.isalpha()]
# ['taken', 'reports', 'to', 'the', 'boss']

result = ' '.join(words)
# taken reports to the boss
3

You can use split() and is isalpha() to get a list of words who only have alphabetic characters AND there is at least one character.

>>> sentence = "[email protected] said: I've taken 2 reports to the boss"
>>> alpha_words = [word for word in sentence.split() if word.isalpha()]
>>> print(alpha_words)
['taken', 'reports', 'to', 'the', 'boss']

You can then use join() to make the list into one string:

>>> alpha_only_string = " ".join(alpha_words)
>>> print(alpha_only_string)
taken reports to the boss
2

The nltk package is specialised in handling text and has various functions you can use to 'tokenize' text into words.

You can either use the RegexpTokenizer, or the word_tokenize with a slight adaptation.

The easiest and simplest is the RegexpTokenizer:

import nltk

text = "[email protected] said: I've taken 2 reports to the boss. I didn't do the other things."

result = nltk.RegexpTokenizer(r'\w+').tokenize(text)

Which returns:

`['asdf', 'gmail', 'com', 'said', 'I', 've', 'taken', '2', 'reports', 'to', 'the', 'boss', 'I', 'didn', 't', 'do', 'the', 'other', 'things']`

Or you can use the slightly smarter word_tokenize which is able to split most contractions like didn't into did and n't.

import re
import nltk
nltk.download('punkt')  # You only have to do this once

def contains_letters(phrase):
    return bool(re.search('[a-zA-Z]', phrase))

text = "[email protected] said: I've taken 2 reports to the boss. I didn't do the other things."

result = [word for word in nltk.word_tokenize(text) if contains_letters(word)]

which returns:

['asdf', 'gmail.com', 'said', 'I', "'ve", 'taken', 'reports', 'to', 'the', 'boss', 'I', 'did', "n't", 'do', 'the', 'other', 'things']
1
  • This isn't what the question is asking. They don't want to split "[email protected]" into "asdf" and "gmail.com". It should be removed entirely because it contains non-letter characters. Jun 18, 2021 at 2:12
0

may this will help

array = string.split(' ')
result = []
for word in array
 if word.isalpha()
  result.append(word)
string = ' '.join(result)
0

You can either use regex or can use python in build function such as isalpha()

Example using isalpha()

result = ''
with open('file path') as f:
line = f.readline()
a = line.split()
for i in a:
    if i.isalpha():
        print(i+' ',end='')
0

str.join() + comprehension will give you a one line solution:

sentence = "[email protected] said: I've taken 2 reports to the boss"
' '.join([i for i in sentence.split() if i.isalpha()])
#'taken reports to the boss'
0

I ended up writing my own function for this because the regexes and isalpha() weren't working for the test cases I had.

letters = set('abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz')

def only_letters(word):
    for char in word.lower():
        if char not in letters:
            return False
    return True

# only 'asdf' is valid here
hard_words = ['ís', 'る', '<|endoftext|>', 'asdf']

print([x for x in hard_words if only_letters(x)])
# prints ['asdf']

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.