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Hello I have problems with assignment where I need to create 3 constructors in one class. That initialize 2 coordinates for 2 corners in a rectangle. The error Eclipse is giving: "Duplicate method" and "Multiple markers on this line" errors with the Constructs.

public class Rectangle {

private double lowleftx;
private double lowlefty;

private double uprightx;
private double uprighty;


public Rectangle() {
    this.lowleftx = 0;
    this.lowlefty = 0;

    this.uprightx = 1;
    this.uprighty = 1;
}

public Rectangle(uprightx, uprighty) {

    this.lowleftx = 0;
    this.lowlefty = 0;
}
public Rectangle(uprightx, uprighty, lowleftx, lowlefty) {

    this.lowleftx = lowleftx;
    this.lowlefty = lowlefty;
    this.uprightx = uprightx;
    this.uprighty = uprighty;
}


public double getLowleftx() {
    return lowleftx;
}

public void setLowleftx(double lowleftx) {
    this.lowleftx = lowleftx;
}

public double getLowlefty() {
    return lowlefty;
}

public void setLowlefty(double lowlefty) {
    this.lowlefty = lowlefty;
}

public double getUprightx() {
    return uprightx;
}

public void setUprightx(double uprightx) {
    this.uprightx = uprightx;
}

public double getUprighty() {
    return uprighty;
}

public void setUprighty(double uprighty) {
    this.uprighty = uprighty;
}

}

4
  • 4
    You forgot to put types of parameters to the constructors. public Rectangle(uprightx, uprighty). They should be like public Rectangle(double uprightx, double uprighty). – Utku Özdemir Sep 29 '17 at 11:49
  • 1
    You didn't include the type for your arguments. ie. public Rectangle(double lowerleft, double upperright){... – matt Sep 29 '17 at 11:49
  • 1
    Hint: putting down random code is an inefficient strategy to learn a programming language. First study books/tutorials to understand how correct syntax looks like. Instead of writing down "something" to then assume that this community exists to help with fixing syntax bugs. – GhostCat Sep 29 '17 at 11:53
  • A huge mistake: Eclipse is not giving back to you nothing at all, it is the virtual machine. Eclipse is just another IDE. – assembler Sep 29 '17 at 12:06
2

As said in the comments, you forgot to add the type of the parameters :

public Rectangle(double uprightx, double uprighty...)

You can optimize your code by calling the constructor with all parameters from other constructors :

public class Rectangle {

    private double lowLeftX;
    private double lowLeftY;
    private double upRightX;
    private double upRightY;

    public Rectangle(double lowLeftX, double lowLeftY, double upRightX, double upRightY) {
        this.lowLeftX = lowLeftX;
        this.lowLeftY = lowLeftY;
        this.upRightX = upRightX;
        this.upRightY = upRightY;
    }

    public Rectangle(double upRightX, double upRightY) {
        this(0, 0, upRightX, upRightY); // = Rectangle(0, 0, upRightX, upRightY)
    }

    public Rectangle() {
        this(0, 0, 1, 1); // = Rectangle(0, 0, 1, 1), or Rectangle(1, 1)
    }

    // ...
}

You can also create a class to represent a "point" (a coordinate with a X value and Y value) and use it in your Rectangle class :

// Point.java
public class Point {

    private final double x;
    private final double y;

    public Point(double x, double y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    // ...
}

// Rectangle.java
public class Rectangle {

    private final Point lowLeft;
    private final Point upRight;

    public Rectangle(final Point lowLeft, final Point upRight) {
        this.lowLeft = lowLeft;
        this.upRight = upRight;
    }

    public Rectangle(final Point upRight) {
        this(new Point(0, 0), upRight);
    }

    public Rectangle() {
        this(new Point(1, 1));
    }
}
0
1

You have missed to specify the double datatype in the constructor arguments, so add it as shown below:

   public Rectangle() {
        this.lowleftx = 0;
        this.lowlefty = 0;
        this.uprightx = 1;
        this.uprighty = 1;
    }

    public Rectangle(double uprightx, double uprighty) {
        this.lowleftx = 0;
        this.lowlefty = 0;
    }

    public Rectangle(double uprightx, double uprighty, 
            double lowleftx, double lowlefty) {
        this.lowleftx = lowleftx;
        this.lowlefty = lowlefty;
        this.uprightx = uprightx;
        this.uprighty = uprighty;
    }
0
0

So, as seen in other answers: you forgot to specify the types for your parameters.

And for completeness: this is how you should really write down this constructors:

public Rectangle() {
  this(1, 1);
}

public Rectangle(double x1, double y1) {
   this(0, 0, x1, y1);
}

public Rectangle(double x1, double y1, double x2, double y2) {
    this.x1 = x1;
    this.y1 = y1;
    this.x2 = x2;
    this.y2 = y2;
}

In other words: avoid repeating code. You can delegate the real "assignment" work into your last ctor. And then you want to use easy to read but still meaningful names. When thinking about coordinates, x1/y1 is for example much easier to grasp then your approach.

2
  • 2
    Not the downvoter, but whether this approach is 'better' depends on who looks at it, I guess. I've also heard plenty of "don't do this"-advocates pleading arguments. – Stultuske Sep 29 '17 at 12:01
  • You may also want to pass actual double values to the next constructor, rather than int. The compiler or the JVM won't care, yes, but it is more readable and avoids issues then someone adds a Rectangle(int, int) constructor (for whatever reason). – Tom Sep 30 '17 at 11:41

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