20

I want my domain class name to match my db table name (no pluralisation).

In EF Core 1.1, I used this code to do that:

public static void RemovePluralisingTableNameConvention(this ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    foreach (IMutableEntityType entityType in modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes())
    {
        entityType.Relational().TableName = entityType.DisplayName();
    }
}

In EF Core 2.0, this code doesn't compile as Relational() is not a method on IMutableEntityType. Anyway, in EF Core 2.0, they have added IPluralizer, documented here:

https://github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework.Docs/blob/master/entity-framework/core/what-is-new/index.md#pluralization-hook-for-dbcontext-scaffolding

There aren't many examples to show how to achieve the same behaviour that I had before. Any clue of how to remove pluralisation in EF Core 2?

1
  • EF Core 2.0's convention is to use a DbSet's name for a table. If you never specified a DbSet for a table then EF Core will use the class name as the table name. Obviously this is all ignored if you specified the table name by using ToTable in the fluent mapping.
    – Met-u
    Commented Dec 11, 2017 at 14:29

5 Answers 5

16

You can do it this way without using internal EF API calls by using the ClrType.Name

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    foreach (var entityType in modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes())
    {
        // Use the entity name instead of the Context.DbSet<T> name
        // refs https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/entity-types?tabs=fluent-api#table-name
        modelBuilder.Entity(entityType.ClrType).ToTable(entityType.ClrType.Name);
    }
}
2
  • 1
    Thank you! and for anyone looking for lowercase table names .ToTable(entityType.ClrType.Name.ToLower()) Commented Nov 26, 2019 at 0:56
  • I used this but extended my models with a TableNameAttribute and decorated the model with that to generate the table name instead.
    – Tod
    Commented Jun 16, 2022 at 16:32
11

In case anyone wants to try in .NET Core 3.1, you can build extension method as

public static class ModelBuilderExtension
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Remove pluralizing table name convention to create table name in singular form.
    /// </summary>       
    public static void RemovePluralizingTableNameConvention(this ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        foreach (IMutableEntityType entityType in modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes())
        {
            entityType.SetTableName(entityType.DisplayName());
        }
    }
}

Ensure you install the dependent package: Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Relational

1
  • I was having issues with this approach as value objects were treated as entities after setting table name against them (at least in EF Core 5). Please see my answer below. Commented Jan 5, 2021 at 19:56
9

You can use exactly the same code. Relational() is extension method defined in the RelationalMetadataExtensions class inside Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Relational.dll assembly, so make sure you are referencing it.

What about IPluralizer, as you can see from the link it's just a Pluralization hook for DbContext Scaffolding, i.e. entity class generation from database, used to singularize entity type names and pluralize DbSet names. It's not used for table name generation. The default table name convention is explained in Table Mapping section of the documentation:

By convention, each entity will be setup to map to a table with the same name as the DbSet<TEntity> property that exposes the entity on the derived context. If no DbSet<TEntity> is included for the given entity, the class name is used.

5
  • Relational() is part of an internal namespace, and may not be available anymore in further versions.
    – Matthieu
    Commented Nov 26, 2019 at 16:41
  • @Matthieu Nope. If you follow the link, you'll see that it is part of the public API. That doesn't stop them to remove it in 3.0 as "breaking change" though :)
    – Ivan Stoev
    Commented Nov 26, 2019 at 16:52
  • "If no DbSet<TEntity> is included for the given entity" - how would it even know to create the table in the first place?
    – Tod
    Commented Jun 16, 2022 at 16:34
  • @Tod Exposing DbSet<TEntity> property is optional (even though the most commonly used). There are other ways for Including types in the model
    – Ivan Stoev
    Commented Jun 16, 2022 at 20:02
  • By recursive discovery? I see they also have a Table attribute which negates the need for my comment in the answer above. 🙄
    – Tod
    Commented Jun 17, 2022 at 16:02
7

This is the extension of @Vicram answer. I applied it in EF Core 5

modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes()            
    .Configure(e => e.SetTableName(e.DisplayName()));

but then if you have value objects in your domain they will all be treated as entity types and created as tables in the database. If your value objects all inherit from a base type like ValueObject you can use the following:

modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes()            
    .Where(x => !x.ClrType.IsSubclassOf(typeof(ValueObject)))
    .Configure(e => e.SetTableName(e.DisplayName()));

I have not checked other EF core versions but surely it is the case in version 5.

Another drawback in EF Core 5 is that when you use inheritance in your entity model, setting tables names changes from Table-per-Hierarchy (TPH) to Table-per-Type (TPT)

You could use the following alternative (assuming your entities derive from BaseEntity class)

modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes()
    .Where(x => x.ClrType.BaseType == typeof(BaseEntity))
    .Configure(e => e.SetTableName(e.DisplayName()));

Where Configure extension is

public static class ModelBuilderExtensions
{
    public static void Configure(this IEnumerable<IMutableEntityType> entityTypes, Action<IMutableEntityType> convention)
    {
        foreach (var entityType in entityTypes)
        {
            convention(entityType);
        }
    }

    public static void Configure(this IEnumerable<IMutableProperty> propertyTypes, Action<IMutableProperty> convention)
    {
        foreach (var propertyType in propertyTypes)
        {
            convention(propertyType);
        }
    }
}
2
  • The best answer. Commented Apr 29, 2021 at 19:41
  • Where do you get the .Configure from in EF 6?
    – Yan
    Commented Dec 15, 2021 at 21:06
0

In EF Core 2 you can add a hook. What is mind bending is that if you use this to generate classes in a library project that has the entities for an asp.net core app, you need to go to package manager console select your library project as default project and add those hooks in the mvc web project. If you add the hooks in the library one it doesn't discover the hook.

You can test it works with

public void ConfigureDesignTimeServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    throw new Exception("works");
    services.AddSingleton<IPluralizer, MyPluralizer>();
}

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