I want to execute a bash script that would do the following:

Application 'ffmpeg' generates a LIVE transport stream (.ts) file. I need to work on this live streaam (perform de-multiplexing, etc).

Now I know this has to be done via FIFOs; but here is my task.

I need to redirect the output of ffmpeg to write to a fifo, and then another application will work on that fifo contents. This happens continuously in real time until I press, say Ctrl+C.

Is this possible? Will I have to do this is two terminals?

I'm basically writing a bash script for the above operations (and more) so do I have to invoke two terminals, or maybe fork?

Kindly advise.

Thanks in advance!

  • 1
    What not just use a pipe? – szatmary Sep 30 '17 at 16:01
  • ffmpeg doesn't support pipes; at least not named pipes. Plus I have to run three instances of ffmpeg simultaneously to three different pipes and then use the three pipes as input to a fourth ffmpeg instance that sort of combines them together. – vedant gala Oct 2 '17 at 6:54
  • 1
    Ffmpeg absolutely supports pipes. – szatmary Oct 2 '17 at 6:55

FFmpeg does support pipes. Everything you have to done is approach as follows:

  1. make a fifo

    mkfifo first.ts  
    
  2. run ffmpeg with pipe

    ffmpeg -i sample.ts -c copy -muxrate 5000000 pipe:1 > first.ts
    
  3. run any other tools which work with transport stream files, e.g. OpenCaster tool tscbrmuxer which can add e.g. NIT table to transport stream file

    tscbrmuxer b:3008 NIT.ts b:5000000 first.ts > second.ts
    
  4. If you want to stop 2 tools simply kill the last one that uses pipe/fifo. in out case you have to kill tscbrmuxer.

    kill tscbrmuxer
    

    OR
    If you are not running last tool in the background simply kill it with [ctrl+c]

Thanks to using such an approach (e.g. as a shell script or Python one) all tools that uses pipe/fifo will be terminated due to broken pipe.

I hope this will help you.

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