2

I have list:

print (L)
[('I', 'WW'), ('am', 'XX'), ('newbie', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ'), 
 ('You', 'WW'), ('are', 'XX'), ('cool', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')]

I want split list to sublists with separator ('.', 'ZZ'):

print (new_L)
[[('I', 'WW'), ('am', 'XX'), ('newbie', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')], 
 [('You', 'WW'), ('are', 'XX'), ('cool', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')]]

I am interested about another possible solutions, performance is important.

0
4

The for-loop approach will be faster, this requires only one-pass:

>>> def juan(L, sep):
...     L2 = []
...     sub = []
...     for x in L:
...         sub.append(x)
...         if x == sep:
...             L2.append(sub)
...             sub = []
...     if sub:
...         L2.append(sub)
...     return L2
...
>>> juan(L, sep)
[[('I', 'WW'), ('am', 'XX'), ('newbie', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')], [('You', 'WW'), ('are', 'XX'), ('cool', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')]]

Some comparisons:

>>> def jezrael(L, sub):
...     return [list(g) + [sep] for k, g in groupby(L, lambda x: x==sep) if not k]
...
>>> def coldspeed(L, sep):
...     L2 = []
...     for i in reversed(L):
...         if i == sep:
...             L2.append([])
...         L2[-1].append(i)
...     return [x[::-1] for x in reversed(L2)]
...
>>> def pm2ring(L, sep):
...     seplist = [sep]
...     return [list(g) + seplist for k, g in groupby(L, sep.__eq__) if not k]
...
>>> setup = "from __main__ import L, sep, juan, coldspeed, pm2ring, jezrael"

Edit: more timings

>>> def buzzycoder(L, sep):
...     a = []
...     length = len(L)
...     start = 0
...     end = L.index(sep)
...     if start < length: a.append(L[start:end+1])
...     start = end + 1
...     while start < length:
...         end = L.index(sep, start) + 1
...         a.append(L[start:end])
...         start = end
...     return a
...

>>> def splitList(l, s):
...     ''' l is list, s is separator, simular to split, but keep separator'''
...     i = 0
...     for _ in range(l.count(s)): # break using slices
...         e = l.index(s,i)
...         yield l[i:e+1] # sublist generator value
...         i = e+1
...     if e+1 < len(l): yield l[e+1:] # pick up
...

>>> def bharath(x,sep):
...     n = [0] + [i+1 for i,j in enumerate(x) if j == sep]
...     m= list()
...     for first, last in zip(n, n[1:]):
...         m.append(x[first:last])
...     return m
...

And the results:

>>> timeit.timeit("jezrael(L, sep)", setup)
4.1499102029483765
>>> timeit.timeit("pm2ring(L, sep)", setup)
3.3499899921007454
>>> timeit.timeit("coldspeed(L, sep)", setup)
2.868469718960114
>>> timeit.timeit("juan(L, sep)", setup)
1.5428746730322018
>>> timeit.timeit("buzzycoder(L, sep)", setup)
1.5942967369919643
>>> timeit.timeit("list(splitList(L, sep))", setup)
2.7872562300181016
>>> timeit.timeit("bharath(L, sep)", setup)
2.9842335029970855

With a bigger list:

>>> L = L*100000
>>> timeit.timeit("jezrael(L, sep)", setup, number=10)
3.3555950550362468
>>> timeit.timeit("pm2ring(L, sep)", setup, number=10)
2.337177241919562
>>> timeit.timeit("coldspeed(L, sep)", setup, number=10)
2.2037084710318595
>>> timeit.timeit("juan(L, sep)", setup, number=10)
1.3625159269431606
>>> timeit.timeit("buzzycoder(L, sep)", setup, number=10)
1.4375156159512699
>>> timeit.timeit("list(splitList(L, sep))", setup, number=10)
1.6824725979240611
>>> timeit.timeit("bharath(L, sep)", setup, number=10)
1.5603888860205188

Caveat

The results do not address performance given the proportion of sep in L, which will affect timings a lot for some of these solutions.

7
  • Thank you for answer. Can you add theBuzzyCoder solution to timings? – jezrael Sep 30 '17 at 7:16
  • Time is no problem, I would like wait with accepting, because it stop posting new solutions. – jezrael Sep 30 '17 at 7:20
  • @jezrael added a bunch of timings – juanpa.arrivillaga Sep 30 '17 at 7:45
  • Sir still a beginner. This is fastest yet +1 :). – Bharath Sep 30 '17 at 7:58
  • I knew that reversal was not necessary. I was trying to strike a balalnce between speed and elegance. I knew how it would look - it would look exactly like yours does. – cs95 Sep 30 '17 at 8:19
4

Your code looks OK to me, but you can speed it up a little by getting rid of that lambda, eg

groupby(L, sep.__eq__)

Not only is the code shorter, it saves the overheads of creating the lambda function, and the relatively slow Python function call.

You could also build [sep] outside the loop, that might save a few microseconds. ;)

from  itertools import groupby

L = [('I', 'WW'), ('am', 'XX'), ('newbie', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ'), 
    ('You', 'WW'), ('are', 'XX'), ('cool', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')]

sep = ('.','ZZ')
seplist = [sep]
new_L = [list(g) + seplist for k, g in groupby(L, sep.__eq__) if not k] 
for row in new_L:
    print(row)    

output

[('I', 'WW'), ('am', 'XX'), ('newbie', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')]
[('You', 'WW'), ('are', 'XX'), ('cool', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')]
3
  • 1 loop, best of 3: 310 ms per loop – cs95 Sep 30 '17 at 6:26
  • @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ Well, at least my code is noticeably faster than the original. ;) But I'm not surprised that yours is even faster. groupby is pretty good, but it's built for versatility, not for speed. And I guess there's also significant overhead in converting the output groups to lists with list(g) and concatenating them with [sep]. – PM 2Ring Sep 30 '17 at 6:32
  • My comment was only to alert you to the fact that I measured the performance for you :-) – cs95 Sep 30 '17 at 6:34
4

A vanilla for loop should be faster than a groupby.

L2 = []
for i in L[::-1]:
     if i == ('.','ZZ'):
         L2.append([])

     L2[-1].append(i)

L2 = [x[::-1] for x in L2[::-1]]

A small tweak (may/may-not improve performance - but is more memory efficient) involves the use of reversed:

L2 = []
sep = ('.','ZZ')
for i in reversed(L):
     if i == sep:
         L2.append([])

     L2[-1].append(i)

L2 = [x[::-1] for x in reversed(L2)]

Another improvement is to reduce the L[-1] reference using another reference:

cache = []
L2 = cache
sep = ('.','ZZ')
for i in reversed(L):
     if i == sep:
         cache = []
         L2.append(cache)

     cache.append(i)

L2 = [x[::-1] for x in reversed(L2)]

Performance

Small

len(L)
8
100000 loops, best of 3: 5.11 µs per loop   # groupby
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.54 µs per loop   # loop

Large

len(L)
800000
1 loop, best of 3: 435 ms per loop    # groupby
1 loop, best of 3: 310 ms per loop    # PM 2Ring's groupby
1 loop, best of 3: 250 ms per loop    # loop
1 loop, best of 3: 235 ms per loop    # loop w/ reverse
6
  • Maybe for large L should be L = L * 100000 ? – jezrael Sep 30 '17 at 6:22
  • @jezrael Added. Let me know if a bigger test sample is required. – cs95 Sep 30 '17 at 6:24
  • reversed is usually faster than [::-1], especially if the sequence is large. – PM 2Ring Sep 30 '17 at 6:34
  • You can go 20% faster by maintaining a reference to the empty list you create (avoiding L2[-1]) and using the in-place .reverse() method. – Blender Sep 30 '17 at 6:42
  • @Blender I find a .15 microsecond improvement on small data, but see no visible difference on larger data. – cs95 Sep 30 '17 at 6:50
3

My solution is:

from  itertools import groupby

sep = ('.','ZZ')
new_L = [list(g) + [sep] for k, g in groupby(L, lambda x: x==sep) if not k] 
print (new_L)
[[('I', 'WW'), ('am', 'XX'), ('newbie', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')], 
 [('You', 'WW'), ('are', 'XX'), ('cool', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')]]

But I believe better / faster solutions exist too.

0
3
a = list()
start = 0
while start < len(l) and (l.index(sep, start) != -1):
    end = l.index(sep, start) + 1
    a.append(l[start:end])
    start = end

This would be my solution. It is simple and readable.

2
  • Seems to be the fastest solution. The l.index() call is the slowest part, so avoiding calculating it twice will make it even faster. – Blender Sep 30 '17 at 6:50
  • You can avoid calculating it twice. I didn't go deeper into optimisation – theBuzzyCoder Sep 30 '17 at 6:52
2

Another solution with enumerate and creating pair with zip i.e

def bharath(x,sep):
    n = [0] + [i+1 for i,j in enumerate(x) if j == sep]
    m= list()
    for first, last in zip(n, n[1:]):
        m.append(x[first:last])
    return m

%%timeit
bharath(L,('.','ZZ'))
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.74 µs per loop
L = L*100000
bharath(L,('.','ZZ'))
1 loop, best of 3: 240 ms per loop 
1
  • This is a great solution if you expect the proportion of sep to be low – juanpa.arrivillaga Sep 30 '17 at 7:55
1

Using generator and slice is very fast:

def splitList(l, s): 
    ''' l is list, s is separator, simular to split, but keep separator'''
    i = 0
    for _ in range(l.count(s)): # break using slices
        e = l.index(s,i)
        yield l[i:e+1] # sublist generator value
        i = e+1
    if e+1 < len(l): yield l[e+1:] # pick up any list left over

l = [('I', 'WW'), ('am', 'XX'), ('newbie', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ'), 
     ('You', 'WW'), ('are', 'XX'), ('cool', 'YY'), ('.', 'ZZ')]    
print(list(splitList(l, ('.', 'ZZ'))))

You can also use with other lists and separators.

l = ['tom','dick','x',"harry",'x','sally','too']
print(list(splitList(l, 'x')))
0

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