1

How can I further improve the performance of the code below while still maintaining the public interface:

public interface IMapper<in TSource, in TDestination>
{
    void Map(TSource source, TDestination destination);
}

public static TDestination Map<TSource, TDestination>(
    this IMapper<TSource, TDestination> translator,
    TSource source)
    where TDestination : new()
{
    var destination = new TDestination();
    translator.Map(source, destination);
    return destination;
}

public static List<TDestination> MapList<TSource, TDestination>(
    this IMapper<TSource, TDestination> translator,
    List<TSource> source)
    where TDestination : new()
{
    var destinationCollection = new List<TDestination>(source.Count);
    foreach (var sourceItem in source)
    {
        var destinationItem = translator.Map(sourceItem);
        destinationCollection.Add(destinationItem);
    }
    return destinationCollection;
}

Example Usage

public class MapFrom { public string Property { get; set; } }

public class MapTo { public string Property { get; set; } }

public class Mapper : IMapper<MapFrom, MapTo>
{
    public void Map(MapFrom source, MapTo destination)
    {
        destination.Property = source.Property;
    }
}

var mapper = new Mapper();
var mapTo = mapper.Map(new MapFrom() { Property = "Foo" });
var mapToList = mapper.MapList(
    new List<MapFrom>() 
    {
        new MapFrom() { Property = "Foo" } 
    });

Current Benchmark

When I run a benchmark against a raw manual conversion, these are the numbers I get:

|             Method |  Job | Runtime |      Mean |     Error |    StdDev |       Min |       Max | Scaled | ScaledSD |  Gen 0 | Allocated |
|------------------- |----- |-------- |----------:|----------:|----------:|----------:|----------:|-------:|---------:|-------:|----------:|
|           Baseline |  Clr |     Clr |  1.969 us | 0.0354 us | 0.0332 us |  1.927 us |  2.027 us |   1.00 |     0.00 | 2.0523 |   6.31 KB |
|  Mapper            |  Clr |     Clr |  9.016 us | 0.1753 us | 0.2019 us |  8.545 us |  9.419 us |   4.58 |     0.12 | 2.0447 |   6.31 KB |
|           Baseline | Core |    Core |  1.820 us | 0.0346 us | 0.0355 us |  1.777 us |  1.902 us |   1.00 |     0.00 | 2.0542 |   6.31 KB |
|  Mapper            | Core |    Core |  9.043 us | 0.1725 us | 0.1613 us |  8.764 us |  9.294 us |   4.97 |     0.13 | 2.0447 |   6.31 KB |

Here is the code for the baseline:

var mapTo = new MapTo() { Property = mapFrom.Property };
var mapToCollection = new List<MapTo>(this.mapFrom.Count);
foreach (var item in this.mapFrom)
{
    destination.Add(new MapTo() { Property = item.Property });
}

Benchmark Code

I have a fully working project containing the mapper and benchmark.NET project in this GitHub repository.

  • I've updated the question with details from a benchmark I did. I'd like to get as close to the baseline as possible and maybe even exceed it. – Muhammad Rehan Saeed Sep 30 '17 at 8:08
  • Why just not implement ISharedProperties interface and use O(1) assignment? – shadow32 Sep 30 '17 at 8:12
  • @shadow32 MapFrom and MapTo happen to have the same property name in my example but this may not always be the case. Think Automapper. – Muhammad Rehan Saeed Sep 30 '17 at 8:16
  • "Maybe even exceed it" - yeah, that's not going to happen, unless your baseline isn't really baseline. Your MapList method is as simple as it gets. If you want to have virtual methods, you will have to spend some CPU time on virtual dispatch. Also, is there a reason for reinventing the wheel? Why not simply use Automapper? AFAIK, Automapper uses Reflection.Emit to generate mapping code and compile it, in order to avoid property name lookups. – Groo Sep 30 '17 at 8:16
  • 2
    One performance bottleneck I've found is using new T() for a constrained type parameter. I've found that passing in a Func<T>() instead can make a huge difference. If you could edit your code into a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example that lets us really easily run the tests, I could see how much difference that makes. (But it's still not going to get to your baseline, of course...) – Jon Skeet Sep 30 '17 at 8:28
2

After implementing the suggestions discussed in the comments, here is the most efficient MapList<TSource, TDestination> implementation I've been able to come up with:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

public static List<TDestination> MapList<TSource, TDestination>(
    this IMapper<TSource, TDestination> translator,
    List<TSource> source)
    where TDestination : new()
{
    var destinationCollection = new List<TDestination>(source.Count);

    foreach (var sourceItem in source)
    {
        TDestination dest = Factory<TDestination>.Instance();
        translator.Map(sourceItem, dest);
        destinationCollection.Add(dest);
    }

    return destinationCollection;
}

static class Factory<T>
{
    // Cached "return new T()" delegate.
    internal static readonly Func<T> Instance = CreateFactory();

    private static Func<T> CreateFactory()
    {
        NewExpression newExpr = Expression.New(typeof(T));

        return Expression
            .Lambda<Func<T>>(newExpr)
            .Compile();
    }
}

Note that I managed to take advantage of Jon Skeet's suggestion not to use new TDestination() without requiring the caller to provide the Func<TDestination> delegate, thus preserving your API.

Of course, the cost of compiling the factory delegate is non-negligible, but in common mapping scenarios I expect it to be worth the trouble.

  • That's really clever. Adding a Func<T> CreateNew() method to the IMapper interface and removing new() as @JonSkeet suggested is 1.21 times the speed of the baseline while your code is 1.34 times slower, so very close. I know I said not to change the interface I can't quite decide which to go with. – Muhammad Rehan Saeed Oct 1 '17 at 12:28

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