1

I have initiated some async infinite loops in my WinForm application, but each time I am trying to break out of them, the program hangs up. I have read some similar topics where people suggested using CancellationTokens, but I am not able to adapt them to my needs. Here is the relevant part of my code.

static bool processStop = false;
static bool processStopped = false;

//Called once 
private async void ProcessData()
{
    while (!processStop)
    {
        await Task.Run
        (
            () =>
            {
                //Do stuff and call regular not async methods
            }
        );
    }
    processStopped = true;
}

//Button click handler to exit WinForm
btnExit.Click += (senders, args) =>
{
    processStop = true;
    //Programm hangs up here

    while (!processStopped);

    FormMain.Close();                
}

Edited the code
The variables are static.
The Close method is the default Close() method for Forms.

14
  • I don't think that the problem is caused by the code you are showing, also it's better if you could show us the code of Close method. – Abdullah Dibas Sep 30 '17 at 10:59
  • 1
    It sounds like you can't adapt this code either, why aren't you asking how to use cancellation tokens? – Crowcoder Sep 30 '17 at 11:01
  • @AbdullahDibas Editted the code to make it more clear. – Efthymios Sep 30 '17 at 11:07
  • @Crowcoder Since I am studying multitasking now, I am not sure if CancelllationTokens are the finest answer for my problem. Also I am not familiar with CancellationTokens yet, so I asked for a more general answer. If it's possible. – Efthymios Sep 30 '17 at 11:11
  • 1
    Try await Task.Run(() =>{...}).ConfigureAwait(false); – Jakub Dąbek Sep 30 '17 at 11:42
3

The problem is that the call to Task.Run continues on the main thread. processStop = true; and while (!processStopped); execute synchronously one after the other. This doesn't let the ProcessData method continue its execution and a deadlock occures.
I see a couple of solutions:

  • Use ConfigureAwait(false) with Task.Run:

    private async void ProcessData()
    {
        while (!processStop)
        {
            await Task.Run
            (
                () =>
                {
                    //Do stuff and call regular not async methods
                }
            ).ConfigureAwait(false);
        }
        processStopped = true;
    }
    

    This will cause the ProcessData to continue on a thread pool and you already use a thread pool by calling Task.Run, so it is not a great solution

  • Wrap the whole process in Task.Run:

    static volatile bool processStop = false;
    static volatile bool processStopped = false;
    
    //Called once 
    private async void ProcessData()
    {
        await Task.Run(() =>
        {
            while (!processStop)
            {
                ...
            }
            processStopped = true;
        });
    }
    

    This would require changing the form of the method passed to work with the loop in it.

  • Make ProcessData a synchronous method to process CPU-intensive tasks and call it properly. CancellationToken would be the preferred way to cancel the task:

    private void ProcessData(CancellationToken token)
    {
        while(!token.IsCancellationRequested)
        {                
            // do work
        }
    }
    

    And call it with this:

    Task processingTask;
    CancellationTokenSource cts;
    
    void StartProcessing()
    {
        cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
        processingTask = Task.Run(() => ProcessData(cts.Token), cts.Token);
    }
    
    btnExit.Click += async (senders, args) =>
    {
        cts.Cancel();
        try
        {
            await processingTask;
        }
        finally
        {
            FormMain.Close();
        }                
    }
    
5
  • 1
    You get points for appropriately using volatile, but you botched your last couple of lines of code: FormMain.Close() will never be called because await processingTask will throw an OperationCanceledException. – Kirill Shlenskiy Sep 30 '17 at 12:33
  • @KirillShlenskiy It won't because the method completes gracefully, I don't use token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested(), but I just check for cancellation. Of course there could be other exceptions so it should be wrapped in try{} finally{} anyway. – Jakub Dąbek Sep 30 '17 at 12:35
  • Ah, but of course: I glanced over the !token.IsCancellationRequested check. It's rather unusual to see it used as part of async Task (as opposed to async void, where it makes more sense). Still, try/finally is definitely a good idea. – Kirill Shlenskiy Sep 30 '17 at 12:38
  • Yeah, I used it just as an easy way to propagate the cancellation request asynchronously, there are other ways to do this. – Jakub Dąbek Sep 30 '17 at 12:40
  • @JakubDąbek Your answer was more than I could ask for. All three of your suggestions were detailed enough. I tried all of them, but only the first and the third one worked. It's fine though. I ended up using the CancellationToken which seems to be the "more professional" way of handling asynchronous tasks. Thank you Jakub and of course everyone for the help! – Efthymios Sep 30 '17 at 12:57
0

If you want to spin a bunch of tasks without blocking you can do this:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WindowsFormsApp1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        //Called once 
        private async Task ProcessData()
        {
            int count = 0;
            while (true)
            {
                await Task.Run
                 (
                     () =>
                     {
                         this.Invoke(new Action(() => {
                             label2.Text = (count++).ToString();
                             label1.Text = DateTime.Now.ToString(); }));
                         Thread.Sleep(100);
                     }
                 );
            }
            Debugger.Break(); //you will never see this hit at all
        }
        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Close();
        }

        private async void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
           await ProcessData();
        }
    }
}
2
  • I must not BREAK the ProcessData() on spot, because it uses the Serial Port and SQL queries.I have to stop it only when the all of the processing cycle is completed, else I won't be able to handle some errors I am already handling with my routines. – Efthymios Sep 30 '17 at 12:32
  • I see. You may want to spin up threads and use Join() to let them complete, and probably a semaphore gate to prevent too many from overwhelming the system. – Crowcoder Sep 30 '17 at 12:38

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