45

I'm using slf4j and I want to unit test my code to make sure that warn/error log messages are generated under certain conditions. I'd rather these be strict unit tests, so I'd prefer not to have to pull up logging configuration from a file in order to test that the log messages are generated. The mocking framework I'm using is Mockito.

  • 1
    Since SLF4J is just a "facade" for other logging implementations, you cannot unit test it just by itself, you also have to specify the implementation you're using. – darioo Jan 10 '11 at 18:49
  • 1
    @darioo - Not true. I could add a setter to my class to pass in the logger from the test, then pass in a mocked out Logger instance and verify that the appropriate log calls were made. I was just hoping to get a more elegant solution than adding a set method just for testing and making my Logger instance non-final. – Javid Jamae Jan 10 '11 at 19:34
  • As an aside, the generally excellent "Growing Object Oriented Software" book has a chapter on unit testing of logging. It's not entirely convincing, but it's certainly well-thought-out, and worth a read (amazon.co.uk/Growing-Object-Oriented-Software-Guided-Signature/…) – skaffman Jan 10 '11 at 19:46

10 Answers 10

10

I think you could solve your problem with a custom appender. Create a test appender which implements the org.apache.log4j.Appender, and set your appender in the log4j.properties and load it when you execute test cases.

If you call back to the test harness from that appender you can check the logged messages

| improve this answer | |
  • 22
    It would be greatly appreciated if you can offer some code samples. – kenshinji Oct 20 '17 at 5:23
  • 2
    but it seems that this example doesn't work for slf4j! – Shilan Jun 19 '18 at 7:12
17

For testing slf4j without relying on a specific implementation (such as log4j), you can provide your own slf4j logging implementation as described in this SLF4J FAQ. Your implementation can record the messages that were logged and then be interrogated by your unit tests for validation.

The slf4j-test package does exactly this. It's an in-memory slf4j logging implementation that provides methods for retrieving logged messages.

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  • Complete example using lidalia's slf4j-test package can be found here: github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger-client-java/pull/378/files. Admittedly, their documentation is quite wonderful as well. – Debosmit Ray Apr 6 '18 at 1:59
  • This no longer works with slf4j-api version 1.8 or higher because: "Planning for the advent of Jigsaw (Java 9), slf4j-api version 1.8.x and later use the ServiceLoader mechanism. Earlier versions of SLF4J relied on the static binder mechanism which is no longer honored by slf4j-api." (see slf4j.org/codes.html). – dzieciou Jan 2 '19 at 18:36
8

A better test implementation of SLF4J that works really well in an environment with concurrent test execution is https://github.com/portingle/slf4jtesting

I've chimed in on a few discussion on slf4j log testing and the limitations of existing test approaches when it comes to concurrent test execution.

I decided to put my words into code and that git repo is the result.

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  • Hopefully soon a third answer will appear from someone who has an even better test implementation of SLF4j.... ;) – Adam Nov 28 '17 at 9:56
7

Create a test rule:

    import ch.qos.logback.classic.Logger;
    import ch.qos.logback.classic.spi.ILoggingEvent;
    import ch.qos.logback.core.read.ListAppender;
    import org.junit.rules.TestRule;
    import org.junit.runner.Description;
    import org.junit.runners.model.Statement;
    import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
    
    import java.util.List;
    import java.util.stream.Collectors;
    
    public class LoggerRule implements TestRule {
    
      private final ListAppender<ILoggingEvent> listAppender = new ListAppender<>();
      private final Logger logger = (Logger) LoggerFactory.getLogger(Logger.ROOT_LOGGER_NAME);
    
      @Override
      public Statement apply(Statement base, Description description) {
        return new Statement() {
          @Override
          public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
            setup();
            base.evaluate();
            teardown();
          }
        };
      }
    
      private void setup() {
        logger.addAppender(listAppender);
        listAppender.start();
      }
    
      private void teardown() {
        listAppender.stop();
        listAppender.list.clear();
        logger.detachAppender(listAppender);
      }
    
      public List<String> getMessages() {
        return listAppender.list.stream().map(e -> e.getMessage()).collect(Collectors.toList());
      }
    
      public List<String> getFormattedMessages() {
        return listAppender.list.stream().map(e -> e.getFormattedMessage()).collect(Collectors.toList());
      }
    
    }

Then use it:

    @Rule
    public final LoggerRule loggerRule = new LoggerRule();
    
    @Test
    public void yourTest() {
        // ...
        assertThat(loggerRule.getFormattedMessages().size()).isEqualTo(2);
    }
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  • this is a clever solution! – Adil Karaöz May 14 at 11:07
  • This is a very cool generic solution. I ran into dependency hell having to exclude logback-classic in hundred different places with the slf4j-test approach, but this solves it elegantly without having to resort to reflection or changing the production code. – Benny Bottema Oct 14 at 9:16
3

Instead of mocking SLF4J you could place the important logging calls you need to test inside their own methods which you can mock more easily.

If you really want to mock SLF4J, I would bet you could create your own provider for it that would allow you to supply a mock logger from the SLF4J side instead of injecting one in your service objects.

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1

Similar to @Zsolt, you can mock log4j Appender and set it on the Logger, then verify calls to Appender.doAppend(). This allows you to test without having to modify the real code.

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  • 1
    I'm not sure why this was voted down. This is exactly what Mockito is for, is to mock collaborators that are difficult to test. This answer has survived without a downvote for nearly 6 years. – Kevin Welker Sep 25 '19 at 15:44
1

Using slf4j-test can remove lot of workarounds discussed above

pom.xml

 <dependency>
       <groupId>uk.org.lidalia</groupId>
       <artifactId>slf4j-test</artifactId>
       <version>1.2.0</version>
 </dependency>

Sample class

@Slf4j
public class SampleClass {

    public void logDetails(){
        log.info("Logging");
    }
}

TestClass

import org.junit.Test;
import uk.org.lidalia.slf4jtest.TestLogger;
import uk.org.lidalia.slf4jtest.TestLoggerFactory;

import static java.util.Arrays.asList;
import static org.hamcrest.Matchers.is;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;
import static uk.org.lidalia.slf4jtest.LoggingEvent.info;

public class SampleClassTest {

    TestLogger logger = TestLoggerFactory.getTestLogger(SampleClass.class);

    @Test
    public void testLogging(){
        SampleClass sampleClass = new SampleClass();
        //Invoke slf4j logger
        sampleClass.logDetails();

        assertThat(logger.getLoggingEvents(), is(asList(info("Logging"))));

    }

}

Refer http://projects.lidalia.org.uk/slf4j-test/ for more details

| improve this answer | |
  • To make it work , user should add below line : ``` ImmutableList<LoggingEvent> loggingEvents = logger.getLoggingEvents(); ImmutableList<Object> arguments = loggingEvents.get(0).getArguments(); String actual = MessageFormatter.arrayFormat(loggingEvents.get(0).getMessage(), arguments.toArray()).getMessage(); ``` – Ashish Sharma Oct 7 at 0:26
0

I have a new answer that I will post at the top in this post (My "old" answer is still at the bottom of this post) (At the time of writing my "old" answer was a "0", so no harm, no foul! )

Newer answer:

Here is the Gradle Package:

  testImplementation 'com.portingle:slf4jtesting:1.1.3'

Maven Link:

https://mvnrepository.com/artifact/com.portingle/slf4jtesting

Germane Code:

(below imports and private method would go in MyTestClass(.java))

import static org.junit.Assert.assertNotNull;

import slf4jtest.LogLevel;
import slf4jtest.Settings;
import slf4jtest.TestLogger;
import slf4jtest.TestLoggerFactory;



@Test
public void myFirstTest() {


    org.slf4j.Logger unitTestLogger = this.getUnitTestLogger();
    ISomethingToTestObject testItem = new SomethingToTestObject (unitTestLogger);
    SomeReturnObject obj = testItem.myMethod("arg1");
    assertNotNull(wrapper);

    /* now here you would find items in the unitTestLogger */

    assertContains(unitTestLogger, LogLevel.DebugLevel, "myMethod was started");

}

// render nicer errors
private void assertContains(TestLogger unitTestLogger, LogLevel logLev, String expected) throws Error {
    if (!unitTestLogger.contains(logLev, expected)) {
        throw new AssertionError("expected '" + expected + "' but got '" + unitTestLogger.lines() + "'");
    }
}

// render nicer errors
private void assertNotContains(TestLogger unitTestLogger, LogLevel logLev, String expected) throws Error {
    if (unitTestLogger.contains(logLev, expected)) {
        throw new AssertionError("expected absence of '" + expected + "' but got '" + unitTestLogger.lines() + "'");
    }
}



    private TestLogger getUnitTestLogger() {
        TestLoggerFactory loggerFactory = Settings.instance()
                .enableAll() // necessary as by default only ErrorLevel is enabled
                .buildLogging();

        TestLogger returnItem = loggerFactory.getLogger(MyTestClasss.class.getName());
        assertNotNull(returnItem);
        return returnItem;
    }

============================= OLD ANSWER BELOW .. DO NOT USE================

Below is my previous answer. I changed my below code ... to use the above package after I discovered it (the above package).

So here is my method.

First, I allow the logger to be injected.  But I provide a default as well:

```java
package com.mycompany.myproject;

import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;

public class MyCoolClass { //implements IMyCoolClass {

    private static final String PROCESS_STARTED = "Process started. (key='%1$s')";

    private final Logger logger;

    public MyCoolClass() {
        this(LoggerFactory.getLogger(MyCoolClass.class));
    }

    public MyCoolClass(Logger lgr) {
        this.logger = lgr;
    }

    public doSomething(int key)
    {
        logger.info(String.format(PROCESS_STARTED, key));
        /*now go do something */
    }
}

Then I wrote a very basic in memory logger


```java
import org.slf4j.Marker;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;

public class InMemoryUnitTestLogger implements org.slf4j.Logger {

    public Collection<String> informations = new ArrayList<String>();
    public Collection<String> errors = new ArrayList<String>();
    public Collection<String> traces = new ArrayList<String>();
    public Collection<String> debugs = new ArrayList<>();
    public Collection<String> warns = new ArrayList<>();

    public Collection<String> getInformations() {
        return informations;
    }

    public Collection<String> getErrors() {
        return errors;
    }

    public Collection<String> getTraces() {
        return traces;
    }

    public Collection<String> getDebugs() {
        return debugs;
    }

    public Collection<String> getWarns() {
        return warns;
    }


    @Override
    public String getName() {
        return "FakeLoggerName";
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isTraceEnabled() {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isTraceEnabled(Marker marker) {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isDebugEnabled() {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isDebugEnabled(Marker marker) {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isWarnEnabled(Marker marker) {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isInfoEnabled(Marker marker) {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isWarnEnabled() {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isErrorEnabled(Marker marker) {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isInfoEnabled() {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isErrorEnabled() {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public void trace(String s) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void trace(String s, Object o) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void trace(String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void trace(String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void trace(String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }


    @Override
    public void trace(Marker marker, String s) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void trace(Marker marker, String s, Object o) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void trace(Marker marker, String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void trace(Marker marker, String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void trace(Marker marker, String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(String s) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(String s, Object o) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(Marker marker, String s) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(Marker marker, String s, Object o) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(Marker marker, String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(Marker marker, String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void debug(Marker marker, String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalDebug(s);
    }

    public void info(String s) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void info(String s, Object o) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void info(String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void info(String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void info(String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void info(Marker marker, String s) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void info(Marker marker, String s, Object o) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void info(Marker marker, String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void info(Marker marker, String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void info(Marker marker, String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalInfo(s);
    }

    public void error(String s) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void error(String s, Object o) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void error(String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void error(String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void error(String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void error(Marker marker, String s) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void error(Marker marker, String s, Object o) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void error(Marker marker, String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void error(Marker marker, String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void error(Marker marker, String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalError(s);
    }

    public void warn(String s) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void warn(String s, Object o) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void warn(String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void warn(String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void warn(String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void warn(Marker marker, String s) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void warn(Marker marker, String s, Object o) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void warn(Marker marker, String s, Object o, Object o1) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void warn(Marker marker, String s, Object... objects) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void warn(Marker marker, String s, Throwable throwable) {
        this.internalWarn(s);
    }

    private void internalDebug(String s) {
        System.out.println(s);
        this.debugs.add(s);
    }

    private void internalInfo(String msg) {
        System.out.println(msg);
        this.informations.add(msg);
    }

    private void internalTrace(String msg) {
        //??System.out.println(msg);
        this.traces.add(msg);
    }


    private void internalWarn(String msg) {
        System.err.println(msg);
        this.warns.add(msg);
    }

    private void internalError(String msg) {
        System.err.println(msg);
        this.errors.add(msg);
    }

Then in my unit tests, I can do one of two things:

private ByteArrayOutputStream setupSimpleLog(Logger lgr) {
    ByteArrayOutputStream pipeOut = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    PrintStream pipeIn = new PrintStream(pipeOut);
    System.setErr(pipeIn);
    return pipeOut;
}

private Logger getSimpleLog() {
    Logger lgr = new InMemoryUnitTestLogger();
    return lgr;
}


private void myTest() {


    Logger lgr = getSimpleLog();
    ByteArrayOutputStream pipeOut = this.setupSimpleLog(lgr);

    MyCoolClass testClass = new MyCoolClass(lgr);
    int myValue = 333;
    testClass.doSomething(myValue);

    String findMessage = String.format(MyCoolClass.PROCESS_STARTED, myValue);
    String output = new String(pipeOut.toByteArray());
    assertTrue(output.contains(findMessage));
}

or similar to the above, but do a cast on the custom Logger

private void myTest() {


    Logger lgr = getSimpleLog();
    MyCoolClass testClass = new MyCoolClass(lgr);
    int myValue = 333;
    testClass.doSomething(myValue);

    String findMessage = String.format(MyCoolClass.PROCESS_STARTED, myValue);
    InMemoryUnitTestLogger castLogger = (InMemoryUnitTestLogger)lgr;
    /* now check the exact subcollection for the message) */
    assertTrue(castLogger.getInfos().contains(findMessage));
}

Take the code with a grain of salt, the ideas are there. I didn't compile the code.

| improve this answer | |
0

I know it's been a while since this question was posted but I just came across a similar issue and my solution may help. Along the lines of the solution proposed by @Zsolt, we use an appender, more specifically Logback's ListAppender. Showing the code and configurations here (Groovy code but can be easily ported to Java):

Groovy class for log access:

import ch.qos.logback.classic.Logger
import ch.qos.logback.classic.spi.LoggingEvent
import ch.qos.logback.core.read.ListAppender
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory

class LogAccess {

    final static String DEFAULT_PACKAGE_DOMAIN = Logger.ROOT_LOGGER_NAME
    final static String DEFAULT_APPENDER_NAME = 'LIST'
    final List<LoggingEvent> list

    LogAccess(String packageDomain = DEFAULT_PACKAGE_DOMAIN, String appenderName = DEFAULT_APPENDER_NAME) {
        Logger logger = (Logger) LoggerFactory.getLogger(packageDomain)
        ListAppender<LoggingEvent> appender = logger.getAppender(appenderName) as ListAppender<LoggingEvent>
        if (appender == null) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("'$DEFAULT_APPENDER_NAME' appender not found. Did you forget to add 'logback.xml' to the resources folder?")
        }
        this.list = appender.list
        this.clear()
    }

    void clear() {
        list.clear()
    }

    boolean contains(String logMessage) {
        return list.reverse().any { it.getFormattedMessage() == logMessage }
    }

    @Override
    String toString() {
        list.collect { it. getFormattedMessage() }
    }
}

Sample logback.xml config:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
    <!-- These 2 'includes' tags ensure regular springboot console logging works as usual -->
    <!-- See https://docs.spring.io/spring-boot/docs/current/reference/html/howto.html#howto-configure-logback-for-logging -->
    <include resource="org/springframework/boot/logging/logback/defaults.xml"/>
    <include resource="org/springframework/boot/logging/logback/console-appender.xml" />
    <appender name="LIST" class="ch.qos.logback.core.read.ListAppender"/>
    <root level="INFO">
        <appender-ref ref="CONSOLE" />
        <appender-ref ref="LIST" />
    </root>
</configuration>

Test:

LogAccess log = new LogAccess()
def expectedLogEntry = 'Expected Log Entry'
assert !log.contains(expectedLogEntry)
methodUnderTest()
assert log.contains(expectedLogEntry)

I use this in a SpringBoot project with Groovy+Spock, though I can't see why this wouldn't work in any Java project with Logback.

| improve this answer | |
0

Just use plain Mockito and some reflection logic to mock it:

// Mock the Logger
Logger mock = Mockito.mock(Logger.class);
// Set the Logger to the class you want to test. 
// Since this is often a private static field you have to 
// hack a little bit: (Solution taken from https://stackoverflow.com/a/3301720/812093)
setFinalStatic(ClassBeeingTested.class.getDeclaredField("log"), mock);

with setFinalStatic method beeing

public static void setFinalStatic(Field field, Object newValue) throws Exception {
    field.setAccessible(true);

    Field modifiersField = Field.class.getDeclaredField("modifiers");
    modifiersField.setAccessible(true);
    modifiersField.setInt(field, field.getModifiers() & ~Modifier.FINAL);

    field.set(null, newValue);
 }    

Then just execute the to be tested code and verify - e.g. the following verifies that the Logger.warn method was called twice:

    ArgumentCaptor<String> argumentCaptor = ArgumentCaptor.forClass(String.class);
    Mockito.verify(mock,Mockito.atLeastOnce()).warn(argumentCaptor.capture());
    List<String> allValues = argumentCaptor.getAllValues();
    assertEquals(2, allValues.size());
    assertEquals("myFirstExpectedMessage", allValues.get(0));
    assertEquals("mySecondExpectedMessage", allValues.get(1));

Please note that setting the final fields via reflection does not work in all cases. I was for example not able to get it working if multiple testcases were trying to modify it.

| improve this answer | |

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