56

In Java it works by accepting an object which implements runnable :

Thread myThread = new Thread(new myRunnable())

where myRunnable is a class implementing Runnable.

But when I tried this in Kotlin, it doesn't seems to work:

var myThread:Thread = myRunnable:Runnable
6
  • var myThread = Thread(myRunnable())
    – Mibac
    Sep 30, 2017 at 17:57
  • @Mibac It Worked!! Can you help me understand this piece of code? Sep 30, 2017 at 18:04
  • Doing myThread:Thread says that variable myThread is of type Thread. And doing myRunnable:Runnable has no sense what so ever. Initializing classes in Kotlin is very similar to Java. You just remove the new keyword. Relevant Kotlin documentation: a, b
    – Mibac
    Sep 30, 2017 at 18:05
  • Thanks. So x:X format works for classes but not for interfaces? Sep 30, 2017 at 18:19
  • It does work for interfaces but when you do x = Y:y the Y:y part makes no sense.
    – Mibac
    Sep 30, 2017 at 18:52

9 Answers 9

73

Kotlin comes with a standard library function thread, which I'd recommend to use here:

public fun thread(
    start: Boolean = true, 
    isDaemon: Boolean = false, 
    contextClassLoader: ClassLoader? = null, 
    name: String? = null, 
    priority: Int = -1, 
    block: () -> Unit): Thread

You can use it like this:

thread {
    Thread.sleep(1000)
    println("test")
}

It has many optional parameters for e.g. not starting the thread directly by setting start to false.


Alternatives

To initialize an instance of class Thread, invoke its constructor:

val t = Thread()

You may also pass an optional Runnable as a lambda (SAM Conversion) as follows:

Thread {
    Thread.sleep(1000)
    println("test")
}

The more explicit version would be passing an anonymous implementation of Runnable like this:

Thread(Runnable {
    Thread.sleep(1000)
    println("test")
})

Note that the previously shown examples do only create an instance of a Thread but don't actually start it. In order to achieve that, you need to invoke start() explicitly.

2
  • 4
    Note that you can omit start = true (because start is true by default) and simply write thread { Thread.sleep(1000) } to get started thread. May 27, 2019 at 8:30
  • I've added a note about this to make it more obvious, thank you
    – s1m0nw1
    May 27, 2019 at 9:57
23

Runnable:

val myRunnable = runnable {

}

Thread:

Thread({  
// call runnable here
  println("running from lambda: ${Thread.currentThread()}")
}).start()

You don't see a Runnable here: in Kotlin it can easily be replaced with a lambda expression. Is there a better way? Sure! Here's how you can instantiate and start a thread Kotlin-style:

thread(start = true) {  
      println("running from thread(): ${Thread.currentThread()}")
    }
1
12

I did the following and it appears to be working as expected.

Thread(Runnable {
            //some method here
        }).start()
7

Best way would be to use thread() generator function from kotlin.concurrent: https://kotlinlang.org/api/latest/jvm/stdlib/kotlin.concurrent/thread.html

You should check its default values, as they're quite useful:

thread() { /* do something */ }

Note that you don't need to call start() like in the Thread example, or provide start=true.

Be careful with threads that run for a long period of time. It's useful to specify thread(isDaemon= true) so your application would be able to terminate correctly.

Usually application will wait until all non-daemon threads terminate.

1
  • 1
    Nice and easy solution...what does isDaemon does? Pls explain that in your answer. Aug 24, 2020 at 20:53
5

Firstly, create a function for set default propery

fun thread(
  start: Boolean = true, 
  isDaemon: Boolean = false, 
  contextClassLoader: ClassLoader? = null, 
  name: String? = null, 
  priority: Int = -1, 
  block: () -> Unit
): Thread

then perform background operation calling this function

thread(start = true) {
     //Do background tasks...
}

Or kotlin coroutines also can be used to perform background task

GlobalScope.launch {

    //TODO("do background task...")
    withContext(Dispatchers.Main) {
        // TODO("Update UI")
    }
    //TODO("do background task...")
}
3

Basic example of Thread with Lamda

fun main() {
    val mylamda = Thread({
        for (x in 0..10){
            Thread.sleep(200)
            println("$x")
        }
   })
    startThread(mylamda)

}

fun startThread(mylamda: Thread) {
    mylamda.start()
}
2
thread { /* your code here */ }
0

Please try this code:

Thread().run { Thread.sleep(3000); }
4
  • 4
    Also try to add some explanation Dec 7, 2017 at 17:04
  • While this may answer the question, it is better to explain the essential parts of the answer and possibly what was the problem with OPs code.
    – pirho
    Dec 7, 2017 at 17:30
  • 3
    This code doesn't solve the problem: it doesn't start new thread but executes Thread.sleep(3000) in current thread instead (using Kotlin's general run extension method which gets newly created thread as a receiver but does nothing with it). May 27, 2019 at 8:14
  • To simplify @IlyaSerbis's explanation: this answer does not work. The code within the brackets executes in whatever parent thread is currently running, not a new thread. :(
    – SMBiggs
    Oct 17 at 22:46
0
fun main(args: Array<String>) {

    Thread({
        println("test1")
        Thread.sleep(1000)
    }).start()

    val thread = object: Thread(){
        override fun run(){
            println("test2")
            Thread.sleep(2000)
        }
    }

    thread.start()

    Thread.sleep(5000)
}
1

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