57

While rewriting my VueJs project in typescript, I came across a TypeScript error.

This is a part of the component that has a custom v-model.

An input field in the html has a ref called 'plate' and I want to access the value of that. The @input on that field calls the update method written below.

Typescript is complaining that value does not exist on plate.

@Prop() value: any;

update() {
    this.$emit('input',
        plate: this.$refs.plate.value
    });
}

template:

<template>  
<div>
    <div class="form-group">
        <label for="inputPlate" class="col-sm-2 control-label">Plate</label>

        <div class="col-sm-10">
            <input type="text" class="form-control" id="inputPlate" ref="plate" :value="value.plate" @input="update">
        </div>
    </div>

</div>
</template>
1
  • You can mark the type as HTMLInputElement Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 22:40

12 Answers 12

53

You can do this:

class YourComponent extends Vue {
  $refs!: {
    checkboxElement: HTMLFormElement
  }

  someMethod () {
    this.$refs.checkboxElement.checked
  }
}

From this issue: https://github.com/vuejs/vue-class-component/issues/94

9
  • 13
    I'm using let mycomp = Vue.extend({}) syntax. How can I do the same in that? Also should I use the above syntax? Commented Mar 17, 2018 at 3:52
  • You could create an interface that represents the type of refs, and then cast to that. At least then you're avoiding the any, and your view will be type checked against it.
    – George
    Commented Mar 18, 2018 at 4:39
  • 1
    Hmm thanks.. I actually hate decorators in vue class components. Commented Mar 18, 2018 at 5:02
  • 1
    This doesn't work. Maybe it used to, but not today (using vue-cli 3).
    – ffxsam
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 20:28
  • 4
    I needed to write $refs!: (notice the exclamation mark) in order for it to work, but I'm using vue-property-decorator. @George could you please edit the answer if my fix is ok? Don't wanna break it for class component users as maybe there's some difference there (EDIT: ah actually the exclamation mark is in the link you posted)
    – user10706046
    Commented Jan 11, 2020 at 18:45
49

Edit - 2021-03 (Composition API)

Updating this answer because Vue 3 (or the composition API plugin if you're using Vue 2) has some new functions.

<template>
  <div ref="root">This is a root element</div>
</template>

<script lang="ts">
  import { ref, onMounted, defineComponent } from '@vue/composition-api'

  export default defineComponent({
    setup() {
      const root = ref(null)

      onMounted(() => {
        // the DOM element will be assigned to the ref after initial render
        console.log(root.value) // <div>This is a root element</div>
      })

      return {
        root
      }
    }
  })
</script>

Edit - 2020-04:

The vue-property-decorator library provides @Ref which I recommend instead of my original answer.

import { Vue, Component, Ref } from 'vue-property-decorator'

import AnotherComponent from '@/path/to/another-component.vue'

@Component
export default class YourComponent extends Vue {
  @Ref() readonly anotherComponent!: AnotherComponent
  @Ref('aButton') readonly button!: HTMLButtonElement
}

Original Answer

None of the above answers worked for what I was trying to do. Adding the following $refs property wound up fixing it and seemed to restore the expected properties. I found the solution linked on this github post.

class YourComponent extends Vue {
  $refs!: {
    vue: Vue,
    element: HTMLInputElement,
    vues: Vue[],
    elements: HTMLInputElement[]
  }

  someMethod () {
    this.$refs.<element>.<attribute>
  }
}
3
  • This lead me to the right direction. I'm new to vuejs, and don't quite understand the $ref usage, so for others like myself: @Ref('aButton') readonly button!: HTMLButtonElement allows you to access the element where <button ref="aButton" ... /> from within your script as this.button.
    – monkut
    Commented Mar 10, 2021 at 17:07
  • const root = ref(null) How can the TypeScript compiler possibly know what the type of root is here? Don't you have to specify the type (HTMLDivElement) explicitly?
    – Rudey
    Commented Nov 9, 2021 at 11:04
  • Yes, I believe that vue's composition api is typed such that ref(null) is really ref<HtmlElement|null>(null) or something like that
    – John Snow
    Commented Nov 12, 2021 at 2:51
20

son.vue

const Son = Vue.extend({
  components: {},
  props: {},
  methods: {
    help(){}
  }
  ...
})
export type SonRef = InstanceType<typeof Son>;
export default Son;

parent.vue

<son ref="son" />

computed: {
  son(): SonRef {
    return this.$refs.son as SonRef;
  }
}

//use
this.son.help();
4
  • 2
    Fantastic way to reference the types of custom components. This way also allows me to avoid using the class decorators. Commented Feb 24, 2021 at 23:21
  • looks cool but methods names autocomplete doesn't work for me in PhpStorm :( import VForm from 'vuetify/src/components/VForm/VForm.ts'; type RefVForm = InstanceType<typeof VForm>;
    – d9k
    Commented Mar 9, 2021 at 22:25
  • InstanceType<typeof Son> is what I needed. Thanks Commented Mar 15, 2021 at 8:16
  • 1
    YES! this is exactly what is missing from the official docs. Why would I want to use a class component? The options API is much better...
    – ortonomy
    Commented Sep 30, 2021 at 2:20
12

This worked for me: use (this.$refs.<refField> as any).value or (this.$refs.['refField'] as any).value

4
  • 4
    should be (this.$refs['refField'] as any).value
    – Jens
    Commented Oct 17, 2019 at 13:26
  • 9
    This clears the error but defeats the benefits of using typescript in the first place.
    – John Snow
    Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 18:39
  • It may be more appropriate to cast to unknown, and then cast or type-guard to whatever else you need. unknown is more permissive, but still does the usual type checks, and is therefore much more safe. Commented Oct 13, 2020 at 19:24
  • There's no need to cast anything. A ref is of type Vue | Element | Vue[] | Element[], and if that's not specific enough, you can use the instanceof operator to fix type errors and throw exceptions or run loops or whatever else you need to do based on the specific return type at runtime. Commented May 31, 2021 at 2:33
6

Avoid using bracket < > to typecast because it will conflict with JSX.

Try this instead

update() {
    const plateElement = this.$refs.plate as HTMLInputElement
    this.$emit('input', { plate: plateElement.value });
}

as a note that I always keep remembering

Typescript is just Javascript with strong typing capability to ensure type safety. So (usually) it doesn't predict the type of X (var, param, etc) neither automatically typecasted any operation.

Also, another purpose of the typescript is to make JS code became clearer/readable, so always define the type whenever is possible.

4

Maybe it will be useful to someone. It looks more beautiful and remains type support.

HTML:

<input ref="inputComment" v-model="inputComment">

TS:

const inputValue = ((this.$refs.inputComment as Vue).$el as HTMLInputElement).value;
4

In case of custom component method call,

we can typecast that component name, so it's easy to refer to that method.

e.g.

(this.$refs.annotator as AnnotatorComponent).saveObjects();

where AnnotatorComponent is class based vue component as below.

@Component
export default class AnnotatorComponent extends Vue {
    public saveObjects() {
        // Custom code
    }
}
1
  • 1
    in case of using options API with defineComponent it is necessary to use as typeof Component
    – pxeba
    Commented Feb 14, 2022 at 13:58
3

I spent a LONG time trying to find an answer to this using Vue 3, TypeScript with class components and (as it happens, although not relevant to this) TipTap. Found the answer from bestRenekton above which finally solved it, but it needed tweaking. I'm pretty sure this is TypeScript specific.

My child component has this at the start:

export default class WhealEditor extends Vue {

It includes this method (the one I want to call from the parent):

doThis(what: string) {
    console.log('Called with ' + what)
  }

And this right at the end:

export type EditorRef = InstanceType<typeof WhealEditor>

</script>

So this announces to any consumer of the child component that it can access it using the variable EditorRef. The parent component includes the child component in the template:

 <WhealEditor ref="refEditor" />

The parent component then imports ref, and the child component and the exposed object:

import { ref } from 'vue'
import WhealEditor, { EditorRef } from './components/WhealEditor.vue'

I then have a method to get this object:

getEditor(): EditorRef {
    // gets a reference to the child component
    return this.$refs.refEditor as EditorRef
  }

Finally, I can handle events - for example:

processButton(msg: string) {
    // runs method in child component
    this.getEditor().doThis(msg)

Like everything else to do with client script, it's so much harder than I expected!

2

Make sure to wrap your exports with Vue.extend() if you are converting your existing vue project from js to ts and want to keep the old format.

Before:

enter image description here

<script lang="ts">

export default {
  mounted() {
    let element = this.$refs.graph;

...

After:

enter image description here

<script lang="ts">

import Vue from "vue";

export default Vue.extend({
  mounted() {
    let element = this.$refs.graph;

...
2

With Vue 3 and the Options API, this is what worked for me:

<script lang="ts">
import {defineComponent} from 'vue';

export default defineComponent({
  methods: {
    someAction() {
      (this.$refs.foo as HTMLInputElement).value = 'abc';
    },
  },
});
</script>

The autocomplete doesn't bring the foo property from $refs because it's defined in the template, and apparently there's no information inferred from it.

However, once you force the casting of .foo to the HTML element type, everything works from there on, so you can access any element property (like .value, in the example above).

2

You can use InstanceType in order to achieve the strong type approach. Please see the example bellow:

UsersPage.vue:

<template>
    <h-table ref="usersTable"></h-table>
</template>

<script lang="ts">
import { defineComponent } from "vue"
import HTable from "@/components/HTable.vue"

type HTableType = InstanceType<typeof HTable>;

export default defineComponent({
    name: "UsersPage",
    components: {
        HTable,
    },
    mounted() {
        (this.$refs.usersTable as HTableType).load(); // "load()" is a strongly typed method which belongs to HTable component. Any modification of that method would cause a compilation error in all places where it's used.
    },
});
</script>
0

I found a way to make it work but it is ugly in my opinion.

Feel free to give other/better suggestions.

update() {
    this.$emit('input', {
        plate: (<any>this.$refs.plate).value,
    });
}
1
  • Casting to any isn't type safe - better to define $refs like in the answer below :)
    – George
    Commented May 17, 2019 at 16:10

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