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I am trying to declare an ArrayList using Reflection. Below is my code

public static void main(String[] args) throws ClassNotFoundException, NoSuchMethodException, SecurityException {
    String intClass="java.lang.Integer";   //This string will be replaced by a string taken from user which will be a class name.
    Class classOf=Class.forName("java.util.ArrayList");
    Class[] parameterslist ={Class.forName(intClass)};
    Constructor constructorOfClass=classOf.getConstructor(parameterslist);
}

When I run this code I get

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodException: java.util.ArrayList.<init>(java.lang.Integer)

When I modify parameterslist as

Class[] parameterslist={int.class}

it works but I have to take the name of parameter class as input from a user, so I can't directly write int.class.

I have already searched about the difference between Class.forName() and Classname.class but answers like this conclude that they are same. I just want to know why we cannot use Class.forName() object to pass as a parameter to ArrayList constructor and how does it work when I write int.class? If Class.forName() is not the right way then how can we make an object of a classname taken as input from a user?

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  • 1
    Well, there is a limited number of primitive types. If I were you I would just create a map and use the primitive types' names as keys and the corresponding Class objects as values. – Sweeper Oct 1 '17 at 7:19
  • @Sweeper you are right. That will solve the problem but still why we can't use Class.forname for this purpose? – Ahsan Oct 1 '17 at 7:23
  • I do not understand. You have hard-coded the classname java.lang.Integer into this code. Where does the user input come into it? or Class.forName()? The only thing wrong with Class.forName() here is the parameter you supplied to it. Unclear what you're asking. – user207421 Oct 1 '17 at 7:24
  • @EJP I added a comment in the code which make things more clear. – Ahsan Oct 1 '17 at 7:31
  • Not really. Either the user gets the class name right or he doesn't. If he doesn't, it's his fault. But I suspect in this case he can't, which is your fault for designing it this way. Reconsider. – user207421 Oct 1 '17 at 7:36
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The ArrayList constructor that you want to use takes as parameter a primitive int and not an Integer class :

public ArrayList(int initialCapacity) 

You provide as argument the Integer class :

String intClass="java.lang.Integer";
...
Class[] parameterslist ={Class.forName(intClass)};

These are not compatible types for reflection usage.

If Class.forname is not the right way than how can we make an object of a classname taken as input from user.

Class.forName() is not the issue here. If you want to create by reflection an object by passing an instance of a specific class as argument of the constructor, the class has to provide a constructor with this type.
For ArrayList, you have only two overloaded constructors with arguments :

public ArrayList(Collection<? extends E> c) 

and

public ArrayList(int initialCapacity) 

So you could retrieve by reflection a constructor with a Collection type or an int type and that's all.

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  • The OP wants to get some user input and get the Class object corresponding to that input. So if the user enters int, he wants to get int.class – Sweeper Oct 1 '17 at 7:27
  • @Sweeper Maybe. It's not evident from his actual question, or the code he posted. It's up to him to clarify, not us to guess. – user207421 Oct 1 '17 at 7:28
  • @Sweeper If it is the case, it is really not clear. I most answered to the last part : "I just want to know why we cannot use Class.forName() object to pass as a parameter to ArrayList constructor and how does it work when I write int.class? " – davidxxx Oct 1 '17 at 7:32
  • @Ahsan: That's certainly not what happens on my box: System.out.println(int.class) prints "int". Which JVM are you using? – Jon Skeet Oct 1 '17 at 7:40
  • You are welcome. Not sure to understand. Integer and int are indeed distinct types. So System.out.println(int.class); prints "int" while System.out.println(Integer.class); prints "class java.lang.Integer". Please check your printing tests. – davidxxx Oct 1 '17 at 7:41

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